Demas Nwoko (Nigerian, born 1935) Children on Cycles

Issue 58, Spring 2019

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin

"While we were putting together this issue, there was one theme that leapt off the page. This is an edition in which Rodin rubs shoulders with the Nigerian artist Demas Nwoko; Japanese printmakers of the 1920s with contemporary British painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye. And yet, despite this diversity of artists and works, one of the threads they have in common is that they "found the future by looking into the past", as Jonathan Jones writes of Rodin on page 36. Rodin is regarded as the first modern sculptor, but that didn't mean that the artist rejected Classicism. Indeed, his critics (of whom there were many) only needed to visit the Louvre to see that Rodin had been inspired by Michelangelo's The Dying Slave, rediscovering the "rippling energy of the Renaissance", as Jonathan puts it. The result was Rodin's magnificent and controversial Age of Bronze, a work that astonished Paris, and a cast of which comes up at London's Impressionist and Modern Art sale. Sometimes one needs to look back to move forward. A group of Japanese printmakers – under the thumb of a young publisher, Shozaburo Watanabe – had been churning out reproductions that used every oriental cliché. What was needed was a dose of Western influence from the Impressionists, whose dynamic use of light and shadow the Japanese gratefully appropriated – in much the same way as Degas and Monet had borrowed from the East. A major collection of prints from these shin hanga artists (on offer in the Japanese Print sale in New York in March) shows how old Japan and the anxieties of the 20th century fused. As Matthew Wilcox writes, this wasn't "a floating world at all, but one that was sinking". Demas Nwoko (b.1935) also drew on his country's artistic traditions and synthesized them with European modernism. But this hardly begins to describe Nwoko's vivid painting The Bicyclists, which, as Ben Okri writes, displays a "versatile eclecticism, [which has been] distilled into a unique voice or tone". It deserves, he argues, to sit alongside Hopper's Nighthawks in the timeline of world art. The work will be displayed in London, before being offered by Bonhams in New York on 2 May, in our new US Africa Now Sale.
Enjoy the issue."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more

Issue 58, Spring 2019

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin

"While we were putting together this issue, there was one theme that leapt off the page. This is an edition in which Rodin rubs shoulders with the Nigerian artist Demas Nwoko; Japanese printmakers of the 1920s with contemporary British painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye. And yet, despite this diversity of artists and works, one of the threads they have in common is that they "found the future by looking into the past", as Jonathan Jones writes of Rodin on page 36. Rodin is regarded as the first modern sculptor, but that didn't mean that the artist rejected Classicism. Indeed, his critics (of whom there were many) only needed to visit the Louvre to see that Rodin had been inspired by Michelangelo's The Dying Slave, rediscovering the "rippling energy of the Renaissance", as Jonathan puts it. The result was Rodin's magnificent and controversial Age of Bronze, a work that astonished Paris, and a cast of which comes up at London's Impressionist and Modern Art sale. Sometimes one needs to look back to move forward. A group of Japanese printmakers – under the thumb of a young publisher, Shozaburo Watanabe – had been churning out reproductions that used every oriental cliché. What was needed was a dose of Western influence from the Impressionists, whose dynamic use of light and shadow the Japanese gratefully appropriated – in much the same way as Degas and Monet had borrowed from the East. A major collection of prints from these shin hanga artists (on offer in the Japanese Print sale in New York in March) shows how old Japan and the anxieties of the 20th century fused. As Matthew Wilcox writes, this wasn't "a floating world at all, but one that was sinking". Demas Nwoko (b.1935) also drew on his country's artistic traditions and synthesized them with European modernism. But this hardly begins to describe Nwoko's vivid painting The Bicyclists, which, as Ben Okri writes, displays a "versatile eclecticism, [which has been] distilled into a unique voice or tone". It deserves, he argues, to sit alongside Hopper's Nighthawks in the timeline of world art. The work will be displayed in London, before being offered by Bonhams in New York on 2 May, in our new US Africa Now Sale.
Enjoy the issue."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more

Issue 58, Spring 2019

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin

"While we were putting together this issue, there was one theme that leapt off the page. This is an edition in which Rodin rubs shoulders with the Nigerian artist Demas Nwoko; Japanese printmakers of the 1920s with contemporary British painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye. And yet, despite this diversity of artists and works, one of the threads they have in common is that they "found the future by looking into the past", as Jonathan Jones writes of Rodin on page 36. Rodin is regarded as the first modern sculptor, but that didn't mean that the artist rejected Classicism. Indeed, his critics (of whom there were many) only needed to visit the Louvre to see that Rodin had been inspired by Michelangelo's The Dying Slave, rediscovering the "rippling energy of the Renaissance", as Jonathan puts it. The result was Rodin's magnificent and controversial Age of Bronze, a work that astonished Paris, and a cast of which comes up at London's Impressionist and Modern Art sale. Sometimes one needs to look back to move forward. A group of Japanese printmakers – under the thumb of a young publisher, Shozaburo Watanabe – had been churning out reproductions that used every oriental cliché. What was needed was a dose of Western influence from the Impressionists, whose dynamic use of light and shadow the Japanese gratefully appropriated – in much the same way as Degas and Monet had borrowed from the East. A major collection of prints from these shin hanga artists (on offer in the Japanese Print sale in New York in March) shows how old Japan and the anxieties of the 20th century fused. As Matthew Wilcox writes, this wasn't "a floating world at all, but one that was sinking". Demas Nwoko (b.1935) also drew on his country's artistic traditions and synthesized them with European modernism. But this hardly begins to describe Nwoko's vivid painting The Bicyclists, which, as Ben Okri writes, displays a "versatile eclecticism, [which has been] distilled into a unique voice or tone". It deserves, he argues, to sit alongside Hopper's Nighthawks in the timeline of world art. The work will be displayed in London, before being offered by Bonhams in New York on 2 May, in our new US Africa Now Sale.
Enjoy the issue."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more

Issue 58, Spring 2019

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin

"While we were putting together this issue, there was one theme that leapt off the page. This is an edition in which Rodin rubs shoulders with the Nigerian artist Demas Nwoko; Japanese printmakers of the 1920s with contemporary British painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye. And yet, despite this diversity of artists and works, one of the threads they have in common is that they "found the future by looking into the past", as Jonathan Jones writes of Rodin on page 36. Rodin is regarded as the first modern sculptor, but that didn't mean that the artist rejected Classicism. Indeed, his critics (of whom there were many) only needed to visit the Louvre to see that Rodin had been inspired by Michelangelo's The Dying Slave, rediscovering the "rippling energy of the Renaissance", as Jonathan puts it. The result was Rodin's magnificent and controversial Age of Bronze, a work that astonished Paris, and a cast of which comes up at London's Impressionist and Modern Art sale. Sometimes one needs to look back to move forward. A group of Japanese printmakers – under the thumb of a young publisher, Shozaburo Watanabe – had been churning out reproductions that used every oriental cliché. What was needed was a dose of Western influence from the Impressionists, whose dynamic use of light and shadow the Japanese gratefully appropriated – in much the same way as Degas and Monet had borrowed from the East. A major collection of prints from these shin hanga artists (on offer in the Japanese Print sale in New York in March) shows how old Japan and the anxieties of the 20th century fused. As Matthew Wilcox writes, this wasn't "a floating world at all, but one that was sinking". Demas Nwoko (b.1935) also drew on his country's artistic traditions and synthesized them with European modernism. But this hardly begins to describe Nwoko's vivid painting The Bicyclists, which, as Ben Okri writes, displays a "versatile eclecticism, [which has been] distilled into a unique voice or tone". It deserves, he argues, to sit alongside Hopper's Nighthawks in the timeline of world art. The work will be displayed in London, before being offered by Bonhams in New York on 2 May, in our new US Africa Now Sale.
Enjoy the issue."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more
  1. VESALIUS, ANDREAS. 1514-1564.    De humani corporis fabrica libri septem.  Basel: Johannes Oporinus, June 1543.
  2. Ito Shinsui (1898-1972)  Showa era (1926-1989), 1928
  3. Demas Nwoko (Nigerian, born 1935) Children on Cycles
  4. Demas Nwoko (Nigerian, born 1935) Children on Cycles
  5. AUGUSTE RODIN (1840-1917) Age d'airain, petit modèle dit aussi 2ème réduction  64.5 cm (25 3/8in). high (Conceived between 1875 - 1877, this reduction from November 1904. This bronze version cast by the Alexis Rudier Foundry between 1935 - 1945.)
  6. <b>1948 Tucker 48</b><br />Chassis no. 1028<br />Engine no. 335-35
  7. The Terry Drury Tribute Ford GT40
  8. <b>1913 Mercer Type 35J "Raceabout"</b><br />Engine no. 1462

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