Robert Delaunay (French, 1885-1941) Les coureurs à pied (Painted in 1924)

Issue 11, January - July 2015

Artists, and indeed collectors of art, have been actively embracing the modern phenomena of 'globalization' long before the industrial, electrical, jet or digital revolutions.

In 1719, the Dutchman Claude du Paquier set up his porcelain works in Vienna, rivaling Meissen for the quality of his hard paste porcelain. His
principal sponsor was the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, who was specifically interested in du Paquier's ability to produce works in the style only previously seen from 'The East Indies'. With its exquisite Japanese decoration, the du Paquier tea service on page 36 is a unique reminder of the West's fascination with all things eastern.

You only have to look at our sale locations from London and Stuttgart, to New York, San Francisco, and Hong Kong, to sense the importance of global demands to our business. In Hong Kong, for example, we concentrate not only on Chinese art but also on other key collecting areas including jewelry (page 13), watches (page 40) and wine and whisky sales (page 34) – all part of placing our client's objects in the prime location to achieve the best prices. Perhaps the best exponent of this philosophy, is our motoring department who have always considered the sale location of crucial importance; the reason why we hold sales away from our network of established auction rooms in locations such as Goodwood, Paris, Stuttgart and Quail Lodge in California.

Art, of course, has always been a universal language able to reach across national boundaries and generations. As Alexander Calder pithily put it, 'The trouble with a lot of artists today is that they have too much technique and equipment. They don't know what to do with it all. If you cut down on it, you can work more strongly within narrower limits'. Calder's startlingly simple arrangements of planes and spheres, as exemplified by his 'Mountain' on page eight give us a new perspective on space and movement. His philosophy strikes a chord with several works sold at Bonhams over the last season from the beautiful simplicity of Anish Kapoor's mirror (opposite) to the magnificent Imperial famille rose bottle vase on page 32 – perfect in both form and stylised design.

In a similar vein, adopting the Calder 'less is more' approach, there follows a very select review of some of the most fascinating and beautiful lots we have had the pleasure to sell over the first half of 2015.

Read more
Demetre Chiparus (1886-1947) 'Semiramis' an Impressive Art Deco Cold-Painted Bronze and Carved Ivory Statue, circa 1928

Issue 11, January - July 2015

Artists, and indeed collectors of art, have been actively embracing the modern phenomena of 'globalization' long before the industrial, electrical, jet or digital revolutions.

In 1719, the Dutchman Claude du Paquier set up his porcelain works in Vienna, rivaling Meissen for the quality of his hard paste porcelain. His
principal sponsor was the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, who was specifically interested in du Paquier's ability to produce works in the style only previously seen from 'The East Indies'. With its exquisite Japanese decoration, the du Paquier tea service on page 36 is a unique reminder of the West's fascination with all things eastern.

You only have to look at our sale locations from London and Stuttgart, to New York, San Francisco, and Hong Kong, to sense the importance of global demands to our business. In Hong Kong, for example, we concentrate not only on Chinese art but also on other key collecting areas including jewelry (page 13), watches (page 40) and wine and whisky sales (page 34) – all part of placing our client's objects in the prime location to achieve the best prices. Perhaps the best exponent of this philosophy, is our motoring department who have always considered the sale location of crucial importance; the reason why we hold sales away from our network of established auction rooms in locations such as Goodwood, Paris, Stuttgart and Quail Lodge in California.

Art, of course, has always been a universal language able to reach across national boundaries and generations. As Alexander Calder pithily put it, 'The trouble with a lot of artists today is that they have too much technique and equipment. They don't know what to do with it all. If you cut down on it, you can work more strongly within narrower limits'. Calder's startlingly simple arrangements of planes and spheres, as exemplified by his 'Mountain' on page eight give us a new perspective on space and movement. His philosophy strikes a chord with several works sold at Bonhams over the last season from the beautiful simplicity of Anish Kapoor's mirror (opposite) to the magnificent Imperial famille rose bottle vase on page 32 – perfect in both form and stylised design.

In a similar vein, adopting the Calder 'less is more' approach, there follows a very select review of some of the most fascinating and beautiful lots we have had the pleasure to sell over the first half of 2015.

Read more
Francis Campbell Boileau Cadell RSA RSW (British, 1883-1937) The Blue Jug 45.2 x 37.4 cm. (17 3/4 x 14 3/4 in.) (Painted circa 1922)

Issue 11, January - July 2015

Artists, and indeed collectors of art, have been actively embracing the modern phenomena of 'globalization' long before the industrial, electrical, jet or digital revolutions.

In 1719, the Dutchman Claude du Paquier set up his porcelain works in Vienna, rivaling Meissen for the quality of his hard paste porcelain. His
principal sponsor was the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, who was specifically interested in du Paquier's ability to produce works in the style only previously seen from 'The East Indies'. With its exquisite Japanese decoration, the du Paquier tea service on page 36 is a unique reminder of the West's fascination with all things eastern.

You only have to look at our sale locations from London and Stuttgart, to New York, San Francisco, and Hong Kong, to sense the importance of global demands to our business. In Hong Kong, for example, we concentrate not only on Chinese art but also on other key collecting areas including jewelry (page 13), watches (page 40) and wine and whisky sales (page 34) – all part of placing our client's objects in the prime location to achieve the best prices. Perhaps the best exponent of this philosophy, is our motoring department who have always considered the sale location of crucial importance; the reason why we hold sales away from our network of established auction rooms in locations such as Goodwood, Paris, Stuttgart and Quail Lodge in California.

Art, of course, has always been a universal language able to reach across national boundaries and generations. As Alexander Calder pithily put it, 'The trouble with a lot of artists today is that they have too much technique and equipment. They don't know what to do with it all. If you cut down on it, you can work more strongly within narrower limits'. Calder's startlingly simple arrangements of planes and spheres, as exemplified by his 'Mountain' on page eight give us a new perspective on space and movement. His philosophy strikes a chord with several works sold at Bonhams over the last season from the beautiful simplicity of Anish Kapoor's mirror (opposite) to the magnificent Imperial famille rose bottle vase on page 32 – perfect in both form and stylised design.

In a similar vein, adopting the Calder 'less is more' approach, there follows a very select review of some of the most fascinating and beautiful lots we have had the pleasure to sell over the first half of 2015.

Read more
Patek Philippe. An exceptionally fine and rare platinum manual wind split second chronograph perpetual calendar wristwatch with box and Certificate of Origin Ref:5004P, Case No.40******, Movement No.8*****, Circa 1995

Issue 11, January - July 2015

Artists, and indeed collectors of art, have been actively embracing the modern phenomena of 'globalization' long before the industrial, electrical, jet or digital revolutions.

In 1719, the Dutchman Claude du Paquier set up his porcelain works in Vienna, rivaling Meissen for the quality of his hard paste porcelain. His
principal sponsor was the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, who was specifically interested in du Paquier's ability to produce works in the style only previously seen from 'The East Indies'. With its exquisite Japanese decoration, the du Paquier tea service on page 36 is a unique reminder of the West's fascination with all things eastern.

You only have to look at our sale locations from London and Stuttgart, to New York, San Francisco, and Hong Kong, to sense the importance of global demands to our business. In Hong Kong, for example, we concentrate not only on Chinese art but also on other key collecting areas including jewelry (page 13), watches (page 40) and wine and whisky sales (page 34) – all part of placing our client's objects in the prime location to achieve the best prices. Perhaps the best exponent of this philosophy, is our motoring department who have always considered the sale location of crucial importance; the reason why we hold sales away from our network of established auction rooms in locations such as Goodwood, Paris, Stuttgart and Quail Lodge in California.

Art, of course, has always been a universal language able to reach across national boundaries and generations. As Alexander Calder pithily put it, 'The trouble with a lot of artists today is that they have too much technique and equipment. They don't know what to do with it all. If you cut down on it, you can work more strongly within narrower limits'. Calder's startlingly simple arrangements of planes and spheres, as exemplified by his 'Mountain' on page eight give us a new perspective on space and movement. His philosophy strikes a chord with several works sold at Bonhams over the last season from the beautiful simplicity of Anish Kapoor's mirror (opposite) to the magnificent Imperial famille rose bottle vase on page 32 – perfect in both form and stylised design.

In a similar vein, adopting the Calder 'less is more' approach, there follows a very select review of some of the most fascinating and beautiful lots we have had the pleasure to sell over the first half of 2015.

Read more
  1. Henry Moore O.M., C.H. (British, 1898-1986) Standing Man and Woman height 7 1/4in (18.5cm)
  2. 1938 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Cabriolet A  Chassis no. 154076 Engine no. 154076
  3. Andy Warhol (1928-1987) Dollar Sign 1982
  4. ALEXANDER CALDER (1898-1976) The Mountain, 1960
  5. no image
  6. Wang Hui (1632-1717) Album of Landscapes
  7. An important fancy coloured diamond and diamond ring
  8. William Wendt (American, 1865-1946) Old Coast Road 30 x 36in overall: 35 1/2 x 41in (Painted circa 1916)
  9. An important rare gem-set Sword with Tiger's head pommel from the Royal Regalia of Tipu Sultan Seringapatam, circa 1787-93(2)
  10. Robert Delaunay (French, 1885-1941) Les coureurs à pied (Painted in 1924)
  11. Henri Le Douanier  Rousseau (French, 1844-1910) Les promeneurs (Painted in 1891)
  12. More than 45 years in current family ownership The Ex-Dick Seaman,  'Charlie' Martin, Tommy Clarke, Maurice Falkner, Clifton Penn-Hughes,  Thomas Fothringham,1935 Aston Martin Works Ulster 'LM19' Mille Miglia, RAC Tourist Trophy, French Grand Prix, Le Mans 24-Hours Competition Sports Two-Seater  Chassis no. LM19 Engine no. LM19
  13. A very rare imperial famille rose bottle vase Yongzheng six-character mark and of the period
  14. Hanyu Ichiro's Malt-Cards Spades Collection (13)
  15. An important set of three gold-mounted Du Paquier porcelain flasks and an agate cup in a Japanese lacquer box, circa 1725-30
  16. Yiannis Tsarouchis (Greek, 1910-1989) Woman from Atalanti with red purse 190 x 70 cm.
  17. Patek Philippe. An exceptionally fine and rare platinum manual wind split second chronograph perpetual calendar wristwatch with box and Certificate of Origin Ref:5004P, Case No.40******, Movement No.8*****, Circa 1995
  18. Francis Campbell Boileau Cadell RSA RSW (British, 1883-1937) The Blue Jug 45.2 x 37.4 cm. (17 3/4 x 14 3/4 in.) (Painted circa 1922)
  19. no image
  20. Demetre Chiparus (1886-1947) 'Semiramis' an Impressive Art Deco Cold-Painted Bronze and Carved Ivory Statue, circa 1928
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