2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127

This lot has been removed from the website, please contact customer services for more information

Lot 135
2020 Ford GT
Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127

CHF 880,000 - 1,000,000
US$ 950,000 - 1,100,000
2020 Ford GT
Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
• Modern reworking of an iconic racing GT
• One owner from new
• Only 1,545 kilometres from new
• Swiss VAT and homologation paid

Footnotes

  • "The GT40 Concept casts a familiar, sleek silhouette of its predecessor, yet every dimension, every curve and line on the car is a unique reinterpretation of the original. The GT40 features a long front overhang reminiscent of 1960s-era race-cars. But its sweeping cowl, subtle accent lines and fibre-optic headlamps strike a distinctly contemporary pose. Its new lines draw upon and refine the best features of GT40 history and express the car's original identity." – Ford Motor Company, 2005.

    Based on Eric Broadley's Lola GT, the original Ford GT40 was spawned by the Dearborn giant's ambition to beat Ferrari at Le Mans, a feat it duly achieved for the first time in 1966. The GT40 project had commenced three years previously, following Ford's failed attempt to buy into Ferrari, and was based at the Ford Advanced Vehicles plant at Slough, England. The GT40 first ran competitively in 1964 but failed at Le Mans that year and again in 1965. That first sweet Le Mans victory would fall to the 7.0-litre Mark II, with victory the following year going to a US-built Mark IV 'J' car. (The GT40 Mark III was the British-built road-going version).

    A decade later and the GT40's status as an all-time great classic sports car had been firmly established, leading to an increased demand for unmolested originals and the start of a replica-building industry. Perhaps the only surprise concerning the emergence of a reconstituted 'official' version is that it took Ford the best part of 40 years to get around to it.

    The 'new generation' GT was developed by Ford's Special Vehicle Team Engineering department under the direction of John Coletti and Fred Goodnow. The composite body panels were unstressed, as on the original, but instead of the monocoque chassis construction used in the 1960s, SVT Engineering developed an all-new aluminium spaceframe combining extruded sections and panels. Doubling as fuel reservoirs, a pair of massive sills contributed much to the original's chassis stiffness, whereas the new GT relied on a centre-tunnel 'backbone' that greatly improved ease of entry and exit. The suspension design was an advance on the original's, consisting of unequal-length control arms and a pushrod/bell-crank system acting on horizontally mounted coil spring/damper units. Braking was handled by six-piston, Alcon callipers with cross-drilled and ventilated discs all round.

    In defeating Ferrari's more highly stressed V12s, Ford proved that the traditional American V8 possessed all that was necessary to compete at the cutting edge of international endurance racing. A far cry from the simple pushrod units of the 1960s, the supercharged MOD 5.4-litre V8 produced 550bhp at 5,250rpm and 500lb/ft of torque at 3,250 revs; figures on a par with those of the 7.0-litre engine that won at Le Mans in 1966 and 1967. The all-synchromesh six-speed transaxle used ZF internals and was sourced from RBT Transmissions, whose founder Roy Butfoy had been a member of Ford's racing team at Le Mans.

    The interior featured leather-upholstered, Recaro bucket seats with aluminium ventilation grommets embedded into the panels. The instrument layout followed the original's, comprising analogue gauges and a large tachometer complemented by modern versions of the traditional toggle switches.
    Back in 1966, the Ford GT40 endurance racer became the first car to exceed 200mph along the Mulsanne straight at Le Mans. Matching that would be some achievement for the production road car, even allowing for nearly 40 years of technological progress. Tested for Motor Trend magazine by Indycar racing legend Bryan Herta, the new Ford GT duly topped 200mph at Ford's Kingman test facility in Arizona, emphatically demonstrating that it was indeed worthy of that famous name. A total of 4,038 cars had been completed when production ceased at the end of 2006, over three quarters of which were delivered in the USA.

    In 2015 a second-generation Ford GT was unveiled at the North American International Auto Show. Technologically a far cry from its predecessors, the new Ford GT features a 3.5-litre twin-turbocharged V6 engine, a carbon-fibre monocoque chassis, carbon-fibre body panels, pushrod suspension, and active aerodynamics. Producing 647bhp, the turbo V6 drives the rear wheels via a Getrag seven-speed DCT gearbox. The factory claims a sub-3.0 second 0-60mph time and a top speed of 216mph (347km/h), which makes the Brembo carbon-ceramic brakes a necessity rather than a luxury.

    In fact, Ford's new supercar had been created with GT racing in mind, hence the presence of an integral roll cage and a host of other competition-car technologies. Yet despite its start-of-the-art track-focused suspension, the GT has a ride quality rivalling that of a luxury saloon. Autocar's Matt Prior was obviously impressed: "the GT... has a level of composure - that balance between ride and handling – that I'm not sure I've better experienced in 20 years of road testing. It's so compliant, yet there's so little roll, and body movements are so well controlled, that is genuinely astonishing". All of the planned 1,000 road models had been sold before deliveries commenced in 2017, and these exclusive supercars remain highly sought after today.

    And as for its maker's racing aspirations, the new GT did not disappoint. At Le Mans on 19th June 2016, the number '68' Ford GT of Ford Chip Ganassi Racing driven by Hand/Müller/Bourdais finished 1st in the LM GTE-Pro class, their victory marking 50 years after Ford's first Le Mans win in 1966 with the original GT40.

    For the 2020 model year, the Ford GT received several mechanical upgrades, the most significant of which was an increase in maximum power output to 660bhp coupled with a broader spread of torque. A new Akrapovič titanium exhaust system saved a few kilograms in weight, while the suspension stiffness in Track mode was increased also.

    Finished in yellow with twin contrasting stripes in black and a black leather interior, the immaculate Ford GT we offer is a rare Europe-delivered example that has covered a mere 1,545 kilometres from new in the hands of its sole owner. Offered with all its original books; a Certificate of Conformity; and proof of Swiss VAT and homologation paid, this stunning car represents a not-to-be-missed opportunity to join the select band of Ford GT owners.

    Ford GT Coupé 2020
    Châssis n° 2FAGP9CW5JH100127

    • Réinterprétation moderne d'une légendaire GT de compétition
    • Première main
    • Seulement 1 545 km depuis l'origine
    • TVA et homologation suisses payées

    "La GT40 Concept reprend la fine et familière silhouette de sa devancière, mais chaque cote, chaque courbe et chaque ligne de cette voiture est une réinterprétation unique de l'originale. Elle présente le fort porte-à-faux avant typique des voitures de course des années 1960. Mais son capot plongeant, la finesse de ses lignes et ses projecteurs à fibres optiques lui confèrent une modernité marquée. Ses lignes nouvelles reprennent en les affinant les meilleures caractéristiques de la GT40 historique tout en affirmant son originalité." – Ford Motor Company, 2005.

    La Ford GT40 initiale, dérivée de la Lola GT d'Eric Broadley, devait son existence à la volonté du géant de Dearborn de battre Ferrari au Mans, ce qui se produisit pour la première fois en 1966. Le projet GT40 avait débuté trois ans auparavant, à la suite de la tentative avortée de rachat de Ferrari par Ford ; il était mené par l'usine Ford Advanced Vehicles de Slough, en Angleterre. La GT40 avait commencé par bien tourner au Mans en 1964, mais elle y avait connu une défaillance, ainsi qu'en 1965. La première victoire au Mans échut à la Mark II de 7,0 litres, et celle de l'année suivante à la Mark IV 'J', construite aux USA (la Mark III était une version de route, construite en Grande-Bretagne).

    Une décennie plus tard, la GT40 avait bien acquis son statut de grande classique du sport automobile toutes époques confondues, ce qui avait entraîné une forte demande d'exemplaires en bon état et le début d'une construction de répliques. La seule surprise de cette réinterprétation 'officielle' est peut-être que Ford ait mis près de 40 ans à se décider.

    La GT 'nouvelle génération' fut développée par le département Special Vehicle Team Engineering de Ford sous la direction de John Coletti et Fred Goodnow. Les panneaux de carrosserie en composite étaient montés libres, comme sur la version d'origine, mais au lieu de la construction châssis monocoque des années 1960, SVT Engineering avait développé un châssis treillis associant des profilés extrudés et des panneaux. Alors que deux seuils massifs, faisant office de réservoirs, contribuaient pour beaucoup à la rigidité du châssis de la version d'origine, la nouvelle GT était axée sur un tunnel central servant de colonne vertébrale et facilitant bien l'accès à bord. La suspension avait progressé par rapport à l'ancienne, avec ses bras d'inégale longueur et un dispositif à basculeur qui actionnait des ensembles ressorts hélicoïdaux/amortisseurs montés à l'horizontale. Le freinage était assuré par des étriers Alcon à six pistons agissant sur quatre disques perforés et ventilés.

    En triomphant des V12 Ferrari plus poussés, Ford apportait la preuve que le traditionnel V8 américain avait toutes les qualités requises pour se battre en première ligne des épreuves d'endurance internationales. A des années-lumière des simples moteurs culbutés des années 1960, le V8 MOD suralimenté de 5,4 litres délivrait 550 chevaux à 5 250 tr/min et 680 N.m de couple à 3 250 tr/min, des chiffres comparables à ceux du 7,0 litres qui avait triomphé au Mans en 1966 et 1967. La boîte-pont à six rapports synchronisés faisait appel à des composants ZF et était assemblée par RBT Transmissions, dont le fondateur Roy Butfoy était un ancien membre de l'équipe Ford Racing du Mans.

    On trouvait à l'intérieur des sièges baquets Recaro garnis de cuir et munis d'orifices de ventilation en aluminium. Le combiné d'instruments s'inspirait de son ancêtre, avec des cadrans analogiques et un grand compte-tours complété par une version moderne des traditionnels interrupteurs à levier.

    En 1966, la Ford GT40 d'endurance avait été la première voiture à dépasser 320 km/h au Mans, dans la ligne droite précédant Mulsanne. Reproduire cet exploit serait pour la future routière de série un beau challenge, même si près de 40 ans de progrès technique séparaient les deux générations. Lors d'un essai effectué pour Motor Trend par le légendaire pilote d'Indycar Bryan Herta, la nouvelle Ford GT accrocha effectivement les 320 km/h sur la piste d'essais Ford de Kingman, en Arizona, montrant ainsi avec panache qu'elle était digne du nom qu'elle portait. Lorsque sa production cessa en 2006, 4 038 voitures avaient au total été produites, dont plus des trois-quarts livrées aux Etats-Unis.

    En 2015, une deuxième génération de Ford GT fut présentée au Salon international d'Amérique du Nord. Techniquement éloignée de ses devancières, la nouvelle Ford GT était équipée d'un V6 double turbo de 3,5 litres, d'un châssis monocoque en fibre de carbone, de panneaux de carrosserie en fibre de carbone, de suspension à basculeurs et d'une aérodynamique active. Son V6 suralimenté délivrait 647 chevaux et entraînait les roues arrière via une boîte DCT Getrag à sept rapports. L'usine revendiquait un 0 à 100 km/h en moins de 3 secondes et une vitesse maximale de 347 km/h, ce qui justifiait pleinement la monte de freins Brembo carbone-céramique.

    La nouvelle supercar de Ford avait en fait été créée pour la course en catégorie GT, ce qui expliquait la présence d'un arceau de sécurité et d'autres dispositifs de compétition. Mais malgré une suspension au mieux de ce qui se faisait pour la piste, la GT présentait un toucher de route digne d'une berline de luxe. Matt Prior, d'Autocar, en avait été clairement impressionné : "La GT ... offre un équilibre entre confort et comportement que je ne suis pas sûr d'avoir vu dépasser en vingt ans d'essais routiers. Elle est tellement docile, avec tellement peu de roulis et des mouvements de caisse tellement bien contrôlés que c'en est véritablement bluffant." La totalité des 1 000 exemplaires de route avait été vendus avant que ne commencent les premières livraisons, en 2017, et ces supercars si exclusives demeurent aujourd'hui encore très recherchées.

    La nouvelle GT fit honneur aux ambitions sportives de son constructeur. Le 19 juin 2016 au Mans, la Ford GT n°68 de l'écurie Ford Chip Ganassi Racing pilotée par Hand/Müller/Bourdais termina première en catégorie LM GTE-Pro. Cette victoire célébrait les 50 ans du premier triomphe de Ford au Mans, sur la GT40 de 1966.

    Lors de l'année-modèle 2020, le Ford GT bénéficia de plusieurs améliorations mécaniques, dont les principales étaient une augmentation de puissance, désormais de 660 chevaux, et un élargissement de la plage de couple. Une nouvelle ligne d'échappement Akrapovič en titane permettait de gagner plusieurs kilos, et la raideur des suspensions en mode piste avait été majorée.
    Cette impeccable Ford GT, de couleur jaune avec deux bandes noires et intérieur en cuir noir, est l'un des rares exemplaires livrés en Europe. Elle a à peine parcouru 1 545 km entre les mains de son unique propriétaire. Elle est proposée avec toute sa documentation de bord d'origine, un certificat de conformité et une attestation de paiement de la TVA et de l'homologation suisses. Cette époustouflante voiture représente une opportunité à ne pas laisser passer, qui permettra de rejoindre la confrérie des possesseurs de Ford GT.
Contacts
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
2020 Ford GT  Chassis no. 2FAGP9CW5JH100127
Auction information

This auction is now finished. If you are interested in consigning in future auctions, please contact the specialist department. If you have queries about lots purchased in this auction, please contact customer services.

Buyers' Obligations

ALL BIDDERS MUST AGREE THAT THEY HAVE READ AND UNDERSTOOD BONHAMS' CONDITIONS OF SALE AND AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THEM, AND AGREE TO PAY THE BUYER'S PREMIUM AND ANY OTHER CHARGES MENTIONED IN THE NOTICE TO BIDDERS. THIS AFFECTS THE BIDDERS LEGAL RIGHTS.

If you have any complaints or questions about the Conditions of Sale, please contact your nearest customer services team.

Buyers' Premium and Charges

Like the vast majority of auctioneers Bonhams charge what is known as a Buyer's Premium. Buyer's Premium on all Automobilia lots will adhere to Bonhams group policy:

25% up to £50,000 of hammer price,
20% from £50,001 to £1,000,000 of hammer price,
and 12% on the balance thereafter. This applies to each lot purchased and is subject to VAT.

For Motor Cars and Motorcycles a 15% Buyer's Premium is payable on the first £50,000 of the final Hammer Price of each Lot, and 12% on any amount by which the Hammer Price exceeds £50,000. VAT at the standard rate is payable on the Premium by all Buyers, unless otherwise stated.

Some lots may be subject to VAT on the Hammer Price. These lots will be clearly marked with the relevant symbol printed beside the lot number in the catalog.

Shipping Notices

For information and estimates on domestic and international shipping as well as export licenses please contact Bonhams Shipping Department.

App