1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C

This lot has been removed from the website, please contact customer services for more information

Lot 133
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet
Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C

CHF 700,000 - 1,000,000
US$ 780,000 - 1,100,000
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet
Chassis no. 57815
Engine no. 57815-85C
• One of only 96 Type 57C supercharged models built
• Delivered new to Bordeaux, France
• Matching chassis, engine, gearbox and rear axle
• Professionally restored in the 2000s
• Aravis body built in the UK to Gangloff drawings

Footnotes

  • By the early 1930s Ettore Bugatti had established an unrivalled reputation for building cars with outstanding performance on road or track; the world's greatest racing drivers enjoying countless successes aboard the Molsheim factory's products and often choosing them for their everyday transport. Although Bugatti is best remembered for its racing models, most of the 6,000-or-so cars produced at the Molsheim factory were touring cars of sporting character. Produced from 1934 to 1940, the Type 57 exemplified Bugatti's policy of building fast and exciting touring cars possessing excellent handling and brakes.

    Because of its lengthy run of success, Ettore Bugatti had remained stubbornly committed to his single-cam engine, only adopting the more advanced double-overhead-camshaft method of valve actuation, after much prompting by his eldest son Jean, on the Type 50 of 1930. From then on Jean Bugatti took greater responsibility for design, his first car being the exquisite Type 55 roadster, a model ranking among the finest sports cars of the 1930s. He followed that with a design of equal stature, the Type 57. A larger car than the Type 55, the Type 57 was powered by a 3.3-litre, double-overhead-camshaft straight eight of modern design, derived from that of the Type 51 Grand Prix car, and was housed in Bugatti's familiar Vintage-style chassis. The range showed the strong influence of Jean Bugatti and at last gave the marque a civilised Grande Routière to match those of rivals Delage and Delahaye.

    The Type 57 was the firm's most popular model and attracted coachwork of the finest quality executed in a startling variety of styles. It was no mere rich man's plaything, though, as evidenced by two outright wins at Le Mans; proof, if it were needed, that ancestral virtues had not been abandoned when creating a car fit to rank alongside Rolls-Royce or Bentley. Its success is revealed by the production figures: according to the Bugatti Trust, some 630 examples of the Type 57/57C were produced between 1934 and 1940, and the post-war Type 101 was based on its chassis. It is estimated that some 96 were the blown 57C variant. Although many Type 57s were fitted with bespoke bodies, the most popular coachwork was built to Jean Bugatti's designs by the marque's preferred carrossier, Gangloff. Gangloff's factory was situated at Colmar, 45 kilometres south of Molsheim, and the majority of Bugatti's bodies was built there.

    The car offered here is a rare example of the Roots-supercharged Type 57C. Chassis number '57815', with engine '85C', was one of a batch of five built in March 1939, two weeks after Jean Bugatti's fatal accident, as France prepared for war. It was completed with a factory Galibier berline body by Gangloff and finished in green with a Havana coloured leather interior. The Type 57C was delivered on 21st April 1939 priced at 108,260 French francs and invoiced to the Bugatti agent Gascogne Automobiles. The first owner was Patrick Bardinet, a cognac brewer of Bordeaux, and the second owner's name was Gattiea.

    Nothing further is known of the car's history until it surfaced in the ownership of Monte Carlo resident Mr Michael Glass, who took the Bugatti with him when he moved to the USA. Mr Glass sold '57815' to Bob Seiffert of Boulder, Colorado, who in turn sold it on to Bill Hinds. Its next owner was Bill Jacobs of Joliet, Illinois. Having stood outside in the cold Chicago winters for many years, the original Galibier body became unusable. Owner of a sizeable collection, Bill Jacobs wanted to built a Gangloff Aravis body for the car (like those on '57749' and '57678') but never got around to doing it. After a negotiation that went on for three years, the vendor eventually bought the Bugatti, unseen, over the telephone and eight weeks later the car arrived in Rotterdam, packed in 17 crates with a detailed inventory of the hundreds of parts. The vendor is the seventh owner.

    A set of drawings (dated 24th November 1938) was obtained for Gangloff's Aravis cabriolet design '3942' (see copy on file). The vendor then commissioned the new coachwork from Vintage Cars of Southampton, UK and visited them on eight occasions to keep track of the work's progress. Named after a French mountain like other Bugatti bodies, the Aravis was a stylish 2/3-seater cabriolet designed by Lucien Schlatter, a designer at the beginning of his career with Gangloff. Only Gangloff and Letourneur et Marchand were allowed to use the Aravis name for this type of cabriolet. It is believed that each firm produced six Aravis bodies making the total produced 12, of which six survive: three by each of the two coachbuilders.
    In addition to having a new body constructed, the chassis, engine and transmission were totally overhauled by Klopper Engineering in Holland and the interior re-trimmed in leather (see restoration photographs on file). Some two years later the restoration was duly completed (at a cost of some CHF600,000). Simon Klopper did an excellent job and on completion the car ran instantly; it remains in excellent condition today.

    The finished Bugatti was shipped from the UK to The Netherlands. Made roadworthy, the car was immediately entered in a Molsheim event and an Alsace rally in the first months following its arrival, covering 1,800 kilometres in the first month. The punctilious Swiss authorities could find no fault with the Bugatti, only remarking that the 45 kilometres on the odometer was 43 kilometres in reality.

    The vendor advises us that the difference in driving between the Type 57 and the 57C is enormous. No doubt the supercharger plays an important role, the Type 57C's blown engine producing 180 horsepower compared with the Type 57's 130. Also, most 57s have heavier steel four-seater bodies, further increasing the performance gap. Another improvement is the blown car's unique hydraulic brakes.

    Boasting a matching chassis, engine, gearbox and rear axle, '57815' has featured in numerous publications, including the Swiss, Netherlands and American Bugatti Registers. The car comes with an extensive history file containing numerous photographs; email correspondence between the vendor and its restorers; a Swiss Carte Grise; and an inspection report from the Swiss authorities identifying no problems.

    Because of its rarity, the supercharged Type 57C is one of the most sought-after of all Bugattis, not the least because of its superior performance, courtesy of that race-developed blown engine. Unquestionably one of the most elegant cars of its era, this rare and desirable 'Aravis' is all the more remarkable for having had only seven custodians, the last two owning it for a combined total of 40 years. It is eligible for numerous prestigious events, including those of Bugatti clubs on both sides of the Atlantic, and thus represents a wonderful opportunity for aficionados of the marque to acquire a unique car with a fascinating history.

    Bugatti Type 57C Cabriolet 'Aravis' – 1939
    Châssis n° 57815
    Moteur n° 57815-85C

    • L'une des 96 Type 57C suralimentées produites
    • Livrée neuve à Bordeaux (France)
    • Châssis, moteur, boîte de vitesses et essieu arrière concordants
    • Restaurée professionnellement au cours des années 2000
    • Carrosserie Aravis construite au Royaume-Uni selon les plans de Gangloff

    Dès le début des années 1930, Ettore Bugatti avait acquis une réputation inégalée de constructeur de voitures aux performances remarquables, tant sur route que sur circuit. Les plus grands pilotes mondiaux appréciaient de collectionner d'innombrables succès au volant des produits de l'usine de Molsheim, et ils les retenaient volontiers pour leur usage personnel. Bugatti est surtout connu pour ses modèles de compétition, mais la plupart des quelque 6 000 voitures sorties de l'usine de Molsheim sont des voitures de tourisme sportives. La Type 57, produite de 1934 à 1940, est typique de la production Bugatti : des voitures de tourisme rapides et enthousiasmantes, à la tenue de route et au freinage tous deux excellents.

    Du fait de leur succès établi de longue date, les moteurs à simple arbre à cames étaient systématiquement retenus par Ettore Bugatti, qui ne se convertit à la commande des soupapes par double arbre à cames en tête, plus moderne, que sous l'impulsion de son fils aîné Jean, sur la Type 50 de 1930. C'est à partir de ce moment que Jean Bugatti étendit son emprise sur la conception, avec pour première création le délicieux roadster Type 55, une voiture qui figurait parmi les plus belles sportives des années 1930. Il continua avec une conception de même envergure, la Type 57. Plus importante que la Type 55, la Type 57 était équipée d'un huit-cylindres en ligne à double arbre à cames en tête de 3,3 litres, un moteur de conception moderne qui dérivait de celui de la Type 51 de Grand Prix et qui s'implantait dans l'habituel châssis 'vintage' des Bugatti. Cette gamme affirmait la forte influence de Jean Bugatti et dotait enfin la marque d'une grande routière raffinée capable de se confronter aux Delage et Delahaye.

    La Type 57 fut le modèle à plus fort succès de l'entreprise et elle eut droit à des carrosseries de la meilleure qualité exécutées dans une étonnante diversité de styles. Mais elle n'était pas que le jouet d'individus fortunés, ainsi que le montrèrent deux complets succès au Mans qui prouvèrent, si nécessaire, qu'on n'avait pas abandonné les anciennes valeurs en créant une voiture du niveau des Rolls-Royce et des Bentley. Les chiffres de production témoignent de son succès : selon l'Héritage Bugatti, quelque 630 exemplaires de la Type 57/57C furent produits entre 1934 et 1940, auxquels s'ajoute la Type 101 d'après-guerre basée sur son châssis. On considère que 96 d'entre elles étaient les Type 57C suralimentées. De nombreuses Type 57 reçurent des carrosseries spéciales, mais la plus répandue était produite par le carrossier préféré de la marque, Gangloff, sur les dessins de Jean Bugatti. L'usine Gangloff se situait à Colmar, à 45 km au sud de Molsheim ; c'est là que se construisaient la majorité des carrosseries de Bugatti.

    La voiture proposée est l'un des rares exemplaires de la Type 57C à compresseur Roots. Le châssis 57815 à moteur 85C faisait partie d'un lot de cinq construits en mars 1939, deux semaines après l'accident qui coûta la vie à Jean Bugatti, alors que la France se préparait à la guerre. Il fut équipé d'une carrosserie d'usine, une berline Galibier construite par Gangloff, verte avec intérieur en cuir havane. Cette Type 57 C fut livrée le 21 avril 1939 et facturée 108 260 Francs à Gascogne Automobiles, un agent Bugatti. Son premier propriétaire était Patrick Bardinet, le propriétaire d'une maison de cognac de Bordeaux ; quant au deuxième, il répondait au nom de Gattiea.
    On ne sait rien de plus de l'histoire de la voiture, jusqu'à ce qu'elle réapparaisse entre les mains de Michael Glass, un résident de Monte-Carlo qui l'emena avec lui lorsqu'il partit pour les Etats-Unis. Il la revendit à Bob Seiffert, de Boulder, Colorado, qui à son tour la céda à Bill Hinds. Son propriétaire suivant fut Bill Jacobs, de Joliet, Illinois. Après plusieurs hivers passés à l'extérieur dans la région de Chicago, la carrosserie Galibier d'origine était devenue hors d'usage. Bill Jacobs, qui était à la tête d'une belle collection, décida de lui faire construire une carrosserie Gangloff Aravis, semblable à celle des châssis 57749 et 57678, mais il n'y parvint pas. Après une négociation qui s'étala sur trois ans, le vendeur actuel, son septième propriétaire, l'acheta par téléphone sans l'avoir vue, et huit semaines plus tard, la voiture débarquait à Rotterdam, sous la forme de dix-sept caisses contenant des centaines de pièces, accompagnées d'une nomenclature détaillée.

    On mit la main sur un jeu de plans datés du 24 novembre 1938 qui définissaient le dessin du cabriolet Aravis 3942 de Gangloff (copie présente au dossier). Le vendeur actuel chargea alors Vintage Cars, de Southampton (Royaume-Uni), de réaliser cette nouvelle carrosserie ; il leur rendit visite huit fois, pour suivre l'avancement des travaux. L'Aravis, qui tire son nom, comme les autres carrosseries de Bugatti, d'une chaîne de montagnes françaises, était un cabriolet 2/3 places racé dessiné par Lucien Schlatter, alors en début de carrière chez Gangloff. Seuls Gangloff et Letourneur et Marchand eurent le droit d'utiliser le nom d'Aravis pour ce type de cabriolet. On considère que chacun en produisit six, ce qui porte le total à douze, dont six survécurent, trois de chaque carrossier.

    En complément à cette nouvelle carrosserie, le châssis, le moteur et la transmission furent rénovés en totalité aux Pays-Bas par Klopper Engineering, et l'intérieur fut regarni de cuir (photographies de la restauration présentes au dossier). La restauration s'étala sur deux ans, pour quelque 600 000 CHF. Simon Klopper fit de l'excellent travail et, une fois terminée, la voiture démarra instantanément. Elle est restée depuis en excellent état.
    Une fois terminée, cette Bugatti fut expédiée du Royaume-Uni aux Pays-Bas. Dès qu'elle fut roulante, elle fut engagée dans une sortie à Molsheim et, dans les mois qui suivirent, dans un rallye alsacien ; elle parcourut 1 800 km le premier mois. Les tatillonnes autorités suisses ne trouvèrent rien à lui reprocher, si ce n'est une surestimation de l'odomètre (43 km réels pour 45 km affichés).

    Le vendeur nous informe qu'il existe une énorme différence de conduite entre une Type 57 et une Type 57C. Il est clair que le compresseur joue un rôle important, car le moteur suralimenté de la Type 57C délivre 180 chevaux, contre 130 pour la type 57. De plus, la plupart des 57 sont des quatre-places à la lourde carrosserie en acier, ce qui ne fait que creuser la différence de performances. Autre supériorité de la version suralimentée, ses freins à commande hydraulique.

    Cette 57815, qui se présente avec un châssis, un moteur, une boîte de vitesses et un essieu arrière concordants, est citée dans de nombreuses publications, dont les Registres Bugatti suisse, néerlandais et américain. Elle est proposée avec un dossier historique complet incluant de nombreuses photographies, des mails échangés entre le vendeur et les restaurateurs, sa carte grise suisse et un rapport de contrôle émis par les autorités suisses et ne mentionnant aucun problème.

    Sa rareté fait que la Type 57C suralimentée est l'une des plus recherchées de toutes les Bugatti, pour beaucoup du fait de ses performances supérieures dues à un moteur de compétition suralimenté. Cette rare et attrayante 'Aravis', sans conteste l'une des voitures les plus élégantes de son temps, est d'autant plus remarquable qu'elle n'a eu que sept propriétaires, les deux derniers sur un total de 40 ans. Elle est éligible à de nombreux évènements prestigieux, dont ceux des clubs Bugatti des deux côtés de l'Atlantique ; elle représente ainsi pour les fans de la marque une merveilleuse occasion d'acquérir une voiture exceptionnelle à l'historique fascinant.
Contacts
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
1939 Bugatti Type 57C 'Aravis' Cabriolet  Chassis no. 57815 Engine no. 57815-85C
Auction information

Buyers' Obligations

ALL BIDDERS MUST AGREE THAT THEY HAVE READ AND UNDERSTOOD BONHAMS' CONDITIONS OF SALE AND AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THEM, AND AGREE TO PAY THE BUYER'S PREMIUM AND ANY OTHER CHARGES MENTIONED IN THE NOTICE TO BIDDERS. THIS AFFECTS THE BIDDERS LEGAL RIGHTS.

If you have any complaints or questions about the Conditions of Sale, please contact your nearest customer services team.

Buyers' Premium and Charges

Bonhams charge a buyer's premium.
For this sale we will charge 15% + TVA of the hammer price.

Collection Notices

All vehicles must be collected from Bonmont by 4pm Monday 21 June 2021.

Customers must notify Marie Gaillarde of Bonhams no later than 10pm on the day of the Sale.

Please note that if Marie Gaillarde hasn't received your notification_by email only ([email protected])_on Sunday evening, your purchase will be automatically transported to a temporary storage facility by the logistics company Car Logistics Ltd on Monday at your cost and risk:

(CHF550 + TVA and CHF30 + TVA for the storage per motor car per day from Tuesday 22 June 2021).

The storage facility will remain operational until 5pm Wednesday 21 July 2021.

Shipping Notices

For information and estimates on domestic and international shipping as well as export licenses please contact Bonhams Shipping Department.

App