<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598

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Lot 95
Offered from the Philip Reed Collection
1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer

Sold for US$ 140,000 inc. premium
Offered from the Philip Reed Collection
1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer
Engine no. 11598

457ci L-head inline 6-Cylinder Engine
Single Updraft Stromberg/Winton Carburetor
48hp
Air-Operated Self-Starting System
4-Speed Transmission
Solid Axles with Semi Elliptic Leaf Springs Suspension
2-Wheel Mechanical Drum Brakes

*Tall gearing and four-speed transmission
*Powerful L-head six-cylinder motor
*Famous touring car with lots of history in the hobby


THE WINTON SIX

"...A very important part of American automobile history died on the day Winton did." This quote from the Standard Catalog of American Cars states just how monumental an impact Alexander Winton had on the motoring industry.

Winton is widely acknowledged as the first to set up a formal manufacturing operation for automobiles in America as well as the first to build, assemble and ship them in series. In 1897 he and his foreman, William A. Hatcher, had driven a two-cylinder Winton from Cleveland to New York. In 1898 his company, the Winton Motor Carriage Company in Cleveland, sold 22 automobiles. In 1899 the number grew to an even 100.

While Winton's speed record cars attracted attention, the single event that shone the spotlight of national publicity on the company and its products was the journey of H. Nelson Jackson and Sewall K. Crocker. The pair traveled from San Francisco to New York City in a two-cylinder 20hp Winton Runabout in the late spring and summer of 1903. The trip took 64 days, of which 44 were actually spent on the road. Jackson and Crocker were among the first to appreciate the unique pleasures of cross-country sightseeing. In retrospect, their journey amounts to something nearly unimaginable. There were literally no roads for much of the trip, no bridges across rivers, streams or gullies, no maps, no water and most significantly no gasoline, oil or tires except for what could be stockpiled along their route by their own planning and foresight.

Their little Winton Runabout, piled high with supplies, tires and camping equipment, must have been quite a sight to the settlers and indigenous residents they encountered along the way.

Jackson donated his cross-country Winton Runabout to the Smithsonian Institution in 1944 where it was displayed with Winton's 1902 "Bullet No. 1" and 1903 "Bullet No. 2" race cars, the latter being the first 8-cylinder engine powered automobile built in America. The cross-country Winton is still on permanent display at the National Museum of American History in Washington, DC.

The unique feature of Winton's early engines was the actuation system for the intake valves which used compressed air to control the intake valves' lift. The carburetors had no throttle control but Winton's system of controlling intake valve lift regulated the amount of air-fuel mixture admitted to the cylinders and therefore the speed of the engine. Engine speed also was adjusted by the driver's control of ignition timing.

Winton, always looking forward, began producing four-cylinder cars in 1904 and was building sixes exclusively by 1908. Winton was not one to follow the rules and his six did not resemble much else of the time, equipped with a split crank case to allow removal of the crankshaft while the engine was in the car. Winton even continued with his unique, but puzzling to many, intake system until it was finally superseded by a conventional carburetor in 1907.

The large six was designed to compete with the finest offerings by Pierce, Packard, Thomas and Lozier. These were high quality machines and equipped for high speed driving. The cars had tremendously high gears and four-speed transmissions that allowed them to barrel down the road with little strain. Winton used aluminum extensively in the car and weight was kept to a minimum despite the car's large size.

THE MOTORCAR OFFERED

An exceptionally correct and fine example of a big Winton Six. Looks to be an older restoration of what was undoubtedly a fine original car. It displays several unique and often discarded Winton features, including the dash fuel system and air powered self-starting system. This expensive and complex system when charged with air works brilliantly. Air admitted into the cylinders turns the engine offering almost silent starting. An onboard air compressor recharges the reservoir once the car is running. A Schrader valve allows the system to be filled from an external compressor if it ever runs to low.

The original wood skinned coach work looks to be in fine condition. The body has all the trademark Winton details such as the combination vents/cowl lights along whit the distinctive Winton windshield. Winton's skinned wood bodies were known for their light weight – always a design priority of the Winton Six. The upholstery is expertly done and authentic. This vehicle was purchased from Wayne Stoll from Oklahoma some time ago, and was a Horseless Carriage Club run participant. This Winton has driven down to Ensenada, Mexico on multiple occasions, making it quite the reliable touring vehicle.

A great example of a rare Winton Six motorcar. Known for great performance and excellent engineering this one is begging to be taken on a brass tour.
Contacts
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
<b>1912 Winton Six 48HP Tourer</b><br />Engine no. 11598
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