WASHINGTON'S FIRST INAUGURAL ADDRESS. Gazette of the United States, No. 6. New York: John Fenno, May 2, 1789.

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Lot 80
WASHINGTON'S FIRST INAUGURAL ADDRESS.
Gazette of the United States, No. 6. New York: John Fenno, May 2, 1789.

Sold for US$ 5,700 inc. premium
WASHINGTON'S FIRST INAUGURAL ADDRESS.
Gazette of the United States, No. 6. New York: John Fenno, May 2, 1789.
Bifolium (437 x 260 mm). Dampstained, upper left quadrant of front page a little soiled.

A VERY EARLY AND RARE FULL PRINTING OF WASHINGTON'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS, INCLUDING A DESCRIPTION OF THE CEREMONY AND ITS EVENTS. The Gazette of the United States, prominent New York newspaper and the unofficial organ of the Federalist party, devotes nearly the entire 3rd page to a description of the proceedings: the procession from Washington's house to the State-House, his introduction to the two Houses, the administering of the first oath of office by Robert Livingstone, the speech, and the subsequent prayers. The Gazette reports that after the oath was administered, "The Chancellor then proclaimed him the President of the United States, which was followed by the instant discharge of 13 cannon, and loud repeated shouts: the President bowing to the people, the air again rang with their acclamations."
Washington's Inaugural Address marks the beginning of the Democractic experiment developed and set forth in the U.S. Constitution, and Washington sets a lofty tone for the new enterprise:

I behold the surest pledges, that as on one side, no local prejudices, or attachments; no seperate views, nor party animosities, will misdirect the comprehensive and equal eye which ought to watch over this great assemblage of communities and interests: so, on another, that the foundations of our National policy will be laid in the pure and immutable principles of private morality; and the pre-eminence of a free Government, be exemplified by all the attributes which can win the affections of its Citizens, and command the respect of the world.

Very rare: we locate no other copies sold at auction in the past 40 years.
Contacts
WASHINGTON'S FIRST INAUGURAL ADDRESS. Gazette of the United States, No. 6. New York: John Fenno, May 2, 1789.
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