1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164

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Lot 306
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater

Sold for £ 356,500 (US$ 459,958) inc. premium
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater
Registration no. BS 8343
Chassis no. 164
*Believed ex-Paris-Rouen Race 1894
*Formerly part of the André Laporte Collection
*Outstandingly original
*Sympathetically restored in 1999
*Louis Vuitton Concours and many-time Goodwood Festival of Speed invitee
*London-Brighton entry 2018 (start number '2')


Footnotes

  • 'The Peugeot is the French car that still maintains its excellence and is the only firm of long- standing repute still manufacturing two-cylinder engined cars and with a range of models from 8 hp to 50 hp ... it is made apparent that the Peugeot cars are fully worthy of the high place they have taken in the motor world.' - Max Pemberton. 'The Amateur Motorist', 1907.

    During the great Paris Exhibition of 1889 Wilhelm Maybach arrived with his new Daimler Stahlrad. Powering it was a new, perhaps the most famous of all Daimler and Maybach's creations, being the V-twin cylinder engine turning at 700-800rpm. At a meeting in Valentigney (the Peugeot headquartes) in late 1888, Emile Levassor, Armand Peugeot and Gottlieb Daimler had convened, a result of which in early 1889 was a contract between Daimler and his Paris business agent Madame Sarazin, wherein the widow agreed to pay Daimler 12 percent of the price of all engines made under his patents in France. The following year Mme Sarazin and Levassor were married and Panhard-Levassor commenced manufacturing the Daimler V-twin engines under licence predominantly making them for Peugeot and their own workshops, both companies producing their first petrol cars with this engine in 1890.

    Pioneers of the French motor industry, Peugeot had sold its first petrol car in 1891. Three years later, keen to prove the merits of its motor cars, Peugeot entered a team of five specially-prepared automobiles for the world's first long-distance motoring competition, a reliability trial of "voitures sans chevaux" from Paris to Rouen. At the controls of entry No 27, a Peugeot Type 5 powered by a rear-mounted Daimler vee-twin engine, was the company's gifted engineer Louis Rigoulot. He had already demonstrated the practicality of the Peugeot carriage by following the 1891 1,200km Paris-Brest cycle race in one of the company's earliest cars and successfully completing the course within the time limit.

    The Type 5 "quadricycle à gazoline" had been specifically developed for the race: Peugeot achieved a 20 per cent weight saving in the design to give a better power-to-weight ratio over their standard production (Type 3) cars. Only 14 Type 5 cars were built.

    Paris-Rouen was where motor sport really began: held on Sunday 22nd July 1894, the trial was organised by the newspaper 'Le Petit Journal'. Of the 102 entries, just 21 cars had passed the eliminating trials held during the previous week and were set off at 8am on a fine morning for the 79-mile journey.Seventeen cars reached Rouen, averaging between 6.1 and 11.6 miles per hour after taking into account compulsory stops, most notably for a protracted lunch!

    All five of the Peugeot team finished, and were the highest-placed petrol cars. Rigoulot finished 11th at an average speed of 9.1 mph. Peugeot was adjudged by the organising committee to have shared the first prize of 5,000 francs (£200) with Panhard-Levassor. Interestingly, one of the other drivers in the Paris-Rouen, a Monsieur Dubois of Chantilly who finished 10th in a Panhard, was so taken by the performance and design of Rigoulot's Peugeot that he appears to have bought the car from the factory once it was released.

    This car retains its original rear-mounted 1,026cc (72x126mm) Daimler v-twin engine with hot-tube ignition, driving through a double cone clutch to a four-speeds-and-reverse 'gearbox'. It has its original Peugeot spray carburettor, with the engine speed being controlled by a governor. The engine was made by Panhard-Levassor under licence from the German Daimler Company. According to Peugeot factory records, this car was commissioned on 25th June 1893. The Panhard-Levassor factory records confirm this 2½hp Daimler engine, number '257', was delivered to Peugeot at Valentigney, Franche-Comte in eastern France on 20th December 1893, and was fitted to this chassis, number '164'. Believed built in 1894 and sold the following year, this car was originally bought by the aforesaid Monsieur Dubois. Extracts from both manufacturers' factory records are in the history file.

    The seller is a long-time enthusiast, owner and studious researcher of early motors cars, and it is his opinion that while there is no concrete proof that this is Rigoulot's Paris-Rouen car, it is of the identical type and that there is good circumstantial evidence to suggest it might be. For instance, it is not clear why Peugeot retained the car for such a long time when they had a long waiting list, and cars were almost always completed well within six months of them receiving engines.

    However, as it has been established that Panhard-Levassor commonly refused to sell cars that took part in races in this period until they were out of date the following year, it is more than likely Peugeot were doing the same. It is even possible, because of the commissioning date in mid-1893 and the delivery of the engine in December of that year, this car could have been completed in 1893.

    However, a more reasonable assumption would be that the car was most likely completed early in 1894. The full application for a Veteran Passport, which lasts for two years, has recently been completed and the VCC dating committee has put a year of circa 1895 on the car based on the date it left the factory - 16th November 1895 - when Monsieur Dubois took delivery. While this is the latest possible date for the car, application for a full dating certificate taking into account the 1893 Panhard and Peugeot records may result in an 1894 date.

    It is not known whether there were any other owners of the car after Monsieur Dubois and his family prior to WW2, but the car was undoubtedly kept safely in favourable conditions. This exceptionally original car was then fortunate to pass into the ownership of André Laporte just after WW2 and became the star of his collection.

    Laporte had been a pilot during the War and the youngest Lieutenant in the French Air Force, becoming an instructor notably to Polish pilots who had joined forces with their British allies. After the War he opened a General Motors dealership in Montpellier and started his collection of old (mainly Veteran and Edwardian) cars, the first of which was acquired in 1946 at his wife's suggestion. Laporte was a very early collector of antique cars and would become President of the Fédération Française des Véhicules d'Époque (FFVE) in 1980 and later Vice President of the Fédération Internationale des Véhicules Anciens (FIVA). His name will always be associated with the creation of the 'Carte Grise de Collection', the registration logbook which allows many old cars to legally run on French roads.

    This very early Peugeot was one of Laporte's favourites and resided for nearly 50 years in Montpellier, Southern France in what became an important collection. André Laporte died in 1996 and this Peugeot was acquired by the vendor at the collection's dispersal sale in October 1998. It was clearly evident at that sale that André Laporte was more interested in originality and conservation than actually using his collection, as the majority of cars were un-restored and 'as found' (including this Peugeot which had, however, been repainted).

    In the words of Jean-Michel Cerede, a noted historian, 'he wanted to pay homage to the pioneers, engineers, and constructors who had made possible the evolution of the motorcar... without committing the sacrilege of putting his silent motors into working order'.

    The car arrived in the UK in late 1998, when it was decided to put it back on the road; it was complete, even down to the tiniest of details. When the mechanical restoration was undertaken, it was decided to do this in as sympathetic a way as possible with every effort made to conserve and preserve rather than replace.

    All the mechanical components are original, including the con-rods, pistons, and valves, together with gear shafts and gears (even the wooden fillets that were riveted between the webbing of the gears to reduce the sound of the straight-cut pinions are still in place). Interestingly, its car number 164 is stamped on every major component (chassis, gear-train, axles, steering, etc), as well as a multitude of smaller items like the fuel tap, reverse lever, linkages, cross shafts and wing brackets. Small leaks were repaired, and various ancillary parts were re-nickeled. New drive chains and a starter chain have been fitted. The only two items that have been remade are the water tank, which is under the seat, and the chain guards.

    The 'Henry' lubricator; the 'Schauffer and Budenberg' air pressure gauge; the original Peugeot 'spray' carburettor; and even the lamps are all lovely original items and remain with the car to this day. The Peugeot remains completely intact with all its original components and still running on hot-tube ignition. It retains its original body, flamboyant flowing wooden wings, some upholstery, and all instrumentation. Remarkably, the deer antler handles on the steering column, reverse grip handle, and handbrake are all still present and in wonderful condition. It received only a light restoration in early 1999 (with a photographic record) and was repainted again as part of that process. It has no modifications from as-new specification and is like a fine piece of moving furniture.

    One contemporary opinion from the Paris to Rouen in 1894 reports: 'The Peugeots, which made a slightly better performance in the trials than did the Panhards, were totally different in construction. They were low built machines with hollow steel tubular frames, in which the cooling water circulated. The wheels were steel spoked and ran on ball-bearings. They used the Panhard-Levassor engine and clutch, but otherwise there was not much likeness between the two'. In relation to the steering, the Peugeots 'did not appear to be so subject as the Panhard lever to jolts from every rut and stone in the road'. This is due to better weight distribution with the engine at the rear and less weight over the front axle. Therefore the steering is light, being chain operated, using the double handgrip steering column.

    The wheels have solid rubber tyres, as pneumatic tyres were not used on cars until André Michelin's first attempts in 1895. The chassis forms part of the cooling system as there is no radiator, with the cooling water being pumped around inside the chassis tubes.

    As an extremely rare Paris-Rouen model, this car has been invited to the Louis Vuitton Concours in 2004, and has been an invited competitor at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in 1999, 2003, 2004, and 2013. In 2013, the Peugeot was selected to lead the amazing 20-car Goodwood Festival of Speed 20-Year Parade up the hill.

    A Type 5 Peugeot was certainly one of the most capable and well designed cars of its day, and together with the Panhard-Levassors that used the same Daimler designed v-twin engine, did more than any other make to glamorise and popularise the motor car. They were the first car manufacturers to introduce series production and were quick off the mark to export their products. Peugeot were very much leaders at the forefront of the 'Dawn of Motoring', yet by the end of 1895 they had made only 173 cars, with Panhard having made 177.

    Following restoration, the car continued to be expertly maintained in-house in a climate-controlled, museum-style environment for the last 20 years. While not a legal requirement, the car has been MoT'd each year and the history file contains certificates covering the last 20 years. It was driven to the MoT station on 20th September 2018 for its annual check, performing faultlessly. The car also has a V5C registration document, a FIVA certificate, a Veteran Passport, and is road licensed. It comes with spare valves, springs, and specialist tools.

    Exercised most years on a variety of events both in the UK and in Europe, notably on 'Hot-Tube' where it has covered 95-100 kilometres per day, the car is still capable of 16mph. It was in remarkably good original condition when restored and has had an easy and cosseted life since! Nothing has been done to the car to modernise or improve it from the day it was made.

    Alongside Benz, Peugeot are one of very few brands to have perpetuated to the modern day, and those of this age are undoubtedly a leap forward in technology from the German competitor, making them extremely significant and important machines. They very rarely come to market and are seldom found outside of national museums or international collections. This year will be the first time the car has taken part in the London to Brighton Run. Carrying competitor number '2', it offers the thrilling prospect of being there at the very start, which only a select few get to experience, that could be you at the helm!
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1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
1894-5 Peugeot Type 5 2½hp Twin-cylinder Two-seater  Chassis no. 164
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