A set of four Regency  sterling silver  master salt cellars from the Lonsdale Service by Benjamin Smith II, London; probably supplied by Rundell, Bridge and Rundell,   1808

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Lot 327
A set of four Regency sterling silver master salt cellars from the Lonsdale Service
by Benjamin Smith II, London; probably supplied by Rundell, Bridge and Rundell, 1808

Sold for US$ 16,250 inc. premium
Property from a Prominent Seattle Family
A set of four Regency sterling silver master salt cellars from the Lonsdale Service
by Benjamin Smith II, London; probably supplied by Rundell, Bridge and Rundell, 1808
The center of each stand engraved with a crest and coronet within the Order of the Garter, height 3 1/2in (9cm); diameter 4 1/2in (11.5cm); total weight approximately 72oz troy.

Footnotes

  • Photo of Lowther Castle courtesy of www.lostheritage.org.uk

    Engraved with the crest, coronet and insignia of Sir William Lowther (1757- 1844), 2nd Baronet and Viscount Lowther after his 1807 creation as Earl of Lonsdale in the County of Westmorland on 7 April 1807 and installation as Knight of the Garter thirteen weeks later.

    William Lowther, 1st Earl of Lonsdale KG was a British Tory politician, nobleman and coal magnate. He inherited the Lowther Estate from his cousin Sir James Lowther in 1802 and hired architect Robert Smirke to redesign what was Lowther Hall into Lowther Castle between 1806 and 1814. The 1st Earl Lonsdale inherited other vast estates and had a significant income allowing him to spend extravagantly to patronize the likes of William Wordsworth, Joseph Turner, John McLean, Rundell, Bridge and Rundell and Paul Storr.

    The European enthusiasm for Egyptian design stemmed from the spoils of the French conquest of Egypt and Admiral Nelson's subsequent defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of the Nile in 1798. Vivant Denon, artist and diplomat who accompanied Napoleon's campaign published detailed drawings of temples and ruins in his Voyage dans la Basse et la Haute Égypte, (Paris 1802) The collector, decorator and financier Thomas Hope influenced the Regency style with his vast collection of antiquities and precise drawings of antique forms in his Household Furniture and Interior Decoration (London, 1807) and this aesthetic was manifested in Hope's iconic Duchess Street, London townhouse.

    A related set of thirty six silver-gilt salts marked for Digby Scott & Benjamin Smith (II) are a part of George IV's Grand Service supplied to Carlton House. Another set of eight were presented to William IV, when Duke of Clarence, by the Jamaica Assembly for Clarence House. An identical set of four silver-gilt salts from the Lonsdale Service, marked for Digby Scott and Benjamin Smith (II), 1803-04 and retailed by Rundell, Bridge and Rundell were offered Sotheby's, New York, 16 April 2013, lot 407.

    The partnership of Digby Scott and Benjamin Smith (II) lasted from 1802 to 1807 and produced some of the finest works of silver of the early 19th century. They were principle suppliers to Royal Goldsmiths Rundell, Bridge and Rundell, who had delivered the aforementioned silver-gilt set for the Lonsdale Service. The maker's marks on the salts offered here appear to be overstruck on a previous more vertical mark, presumably that of Digby Scott and Benjamin Smith II. Given the date of 1808 it can be speculated that the salts were commissioned sometime prior to the dissolution of the partnership and delivered after Smith had independently entered this mark on 11 May 1807.
Contacts
A set of four Regency  sterling silver  master salt cellars from the Lonsdale Service by Benjamin Smith II, London; probably supplied by Rundell, Bridge and Rundell,   1808
A set of four Regency  sterling silver  master salt cellars from the Lonsdale Service by Benjamin Smith II, London; probably supplied by Rundell, Bridge and Rundell,   1808
A set of four Regency  sterling silver  master salt cellars from the Lonsdale Service by Benjamin Smith II, London; probably supplied by Rundell, Bridge and Rundell,   1808
A set of four Regency  sterling silver  master salt cellars from the Lonsdale Service by Benjamin Smith II, London; probably supplied by Rundell, Bridge and Rundell,   1808
A set of four Regency  sterling silver  master salt cellars from the Lonsdale Service by Benjamin Smith II, London; probably supplied by Rundell, Bridge and Rundell,   1808
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