A rare and interesting Charles I oak joined table, circa 1640 Apparently designed to be portable

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Lot 106
A rare and interesting Charles I oak joined table, circa 1640
Apparently designed to be portable

Sold for £ 9,375 (US$ 12,891) inc. premium
Lots 1 - 119: The Collection of Graham & Susan James
A rare and interesting Charles I oak joined table, circa 1640
Apparently designed to be portable
The top, rails and upper leg blocks are separate from the baluster-turned legs and plain stretchers, the near square-framed top with a drop-flap to each side opening to form a circle, the flaps supported on lopers, closed: 111.5cm wide x 107.5cm deep x 73cm high; open: 149cm wide x 146cm deep

Footnotes

  • Provenance: Purchased Alistair Sampson Antiques Ltd incorporating Tobias Jellinek Limited, London, 7th December 1992. Described on the receipt as 'An extremely rare and interesting early 17th century English oak table...possibly for travelling purposes'.

    Literature: Two examples of oak tables 'with falling leaves on all four sides' are illustrated R. W. Symonds, Furniture making in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century England (1955), Figures 70 and 71, pp. 48 - 49. The latter example is from Mostyn Hall, Nr. Holywell, Flintshire, and the underside of the top, similar to that found here, is illustrated Figure 72. Both of the illustrated tables are also designed to be taken apart and the author questions the purpose of this. It is noted that an obvious explanation would be reduced access within a building. However, the 'large and substantial base' found on each table, is particularly remarked upon, with the author concluding that this points to another design requirement; 'stability'. It is concluded that both table were designed 'for use on board a ship', (ibid. p. 62). The author lists further tables of the same design in Southwold Church, Suffolk; Governor's Palace, Colonial Williamsburg; and the Chapter House, Manchester Cathedral, which reputedly came from Bramshill Park, Hampshire. Victor Chinnery, Oak Furniture: The British Tradition (1993), illustrates a further comparable oblong table, described as 'an otherwise normal rectangular table is fitted with falling leaves, supported on lopers, which rise to make an oval top', Figure 3:202, p. 302.
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A rare and interesting Charles I oak joined table, circa 1640 Apparently designed to be portable
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