1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843
Lot 10
1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis
Sold for € 471,500 (US$ 530,956) inc. premium

Lot Details
1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843 1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis Engine no. 2843
1901 Benz Ideal 7hp Twin Cylinder "Contra-Motor" Vis-à-vis
Registration no. Former UK Registration "L 51"
Engine no. 2843
The first internal combustion-engined car which performed with any degree of success is generally attributed to German engineer Carl Benz and was a spindly three-wheeler with massive horizontally-mounted engine. Following Carl Benz's first faltering run in that car in the Autumn of 1885 the German Press wrote, 'this engine – vélocipede will make a strong appeal to a large circle, as it should prove itself quite practical and useful to doctors, travellers and lovers of sport.' This first effort developed not less than 0.9hp giving a top speed approaching 8mph. By 1892 Benz cars had four wheels and the Vélocipede (Vélo) introduced in 1894 had a single-cylinder engine developing 1.5hp.

The Vélo was the best selling car of its day and engine refinements resulted in 3 1/2hp being developed by 1895 or so. This highly successful 3 1/2hp engine was to remain the backbone of production for Benz cars through to 1900. Benz had many imitators and their products were built under licence by other European manufacturers such as Hurtu, Star and Marshall. The basic Benz design was to influence motor car production from 1885 to 1900 and only the arrival of the new 'Système Panhard' and also De Dion Bouton's fast-revving vertical engines was to sound its deathknell.

As with any manufacturer the product evolved over time, they added models to the range but most adhered closely the Vélo theme. Catalogued from 1898, one of those was the "Ideal", a term which resonates in many languages and for those who wanted to get from point A to point B without a horse, it was most certainly was just that. With the advent of the Ideal the body or coachwork now sat on a flat platform as opposed to the undulating Velo frame, across from the main two seats was a small additional seating space, albeit the passengers being rather exposed and out front was a small bonnet presumably to make it the car appear a little more like its front engined competitors. In this form, the Benz Patent Motorwagen would survive through to 1902, when its concepts gave way to more modern designs.

The Ideal of 1900 also featured an intermediary mechanical gearbox in the belt and chain final drive system. Solid tyres were still the order of the day in 1900 but suspension was good with full elliptic front and rear springing and also a full elliptic transverse front spring.

Towards the end of the production of the Patent Motorwagen, Benz offered the "Ideal" with a two cylinder engine. This format combined the design of two standard Benz motors on a common crankshaft, making the original "boxer" format - which they termed a 'Contra-Motor'. The combined engine capacity was now 2090cc, and while it added a little weight to the car, it provided nearly twice the horsepower in the still relatively lightweight frame - some 50kph as a top speed was claimed. Contra-Motor Benz's have long held esteem among collectors and despite the relatively outdated frame in which they were constructed the modernity of the 'boxer' engine has its own statement in time.
This very fine example of the late Patent Motorwagen in Contra-motor form has been known within car collecting circles since the incubation of the hobby in the 1930s. In its file is correspondence confirming its history back to this period, much of it provided by its longest custodian Major John W. Mills in the U.K. In one note he states "I bought this car in September, 1937 from a Mr. N. T. Bryan, Ashley Cottage, Ashley Green, nr. Chesham, Bucks. The previous owner was R. J. G. Nash of Fraser Nash Cars (sic)." While his reference and connection is actually incorrect, as R.J.G. Nash was not connected with Frazer Nash, its principal was, of course Archie Frazer-Nash, the Nash to whom he almost certainly refers to was a regular entrant on the London to Brighton and a number of Veteran cars passed through his hands. The date of the acquisition is certainly correct as Major Mills continues to describe that he ran the car on the London to Brighton Run in 1937 and 1938, winning the 'appropriate age class' in the latter event, and he is listed in the program for that year as owning this car.

In this pre-war period the Benz was brought to the attention of the Veteran Car Club of Great Britain, then in the earliest days of its inception and received confirmation of its build date as 1901 in their dating process. It received their 64th Certificate for such cars researched by this institution, in 1937. From 1946-1960 Mills notes that he ran the Contra-motor in various events including numerous London to Brightons, after which it seems it was laid up.

In the period of 1971-1972 it was comprehensively restored for him by A. Farquhar and P.D. Woodley's Automobile Restorations of Leicester. In a well detailed invoice for the considerable sum of £1,900, being more than they had expected to charge, as the car was by then very tired. This work is noted as having included full refurbishment of the body with some new wood, and extensive mechanical restoration.

According to a copy of its British old buff log book, the Benz continued to be owner by Mills until 1973, at which point it passed to John Hattrell and John Leech and at the end of 1977 into the hands of noted Benz exponent Bernard Garrett. The present owners acquired the Ideal from Mr. Garrett directly in March 1980, more than 34 years ago.

In addition to this documented history, it seems likely from the British licence plate which it has worn from at least the 1930s that the "Ideal" was one of the very first cars to have been registered in the Welsh Glamorgan region of the British Isles, designated by its "L" prefix, its following number confirms it to have been the 51st car in that area.

Over the ensuing three or more decades, the Benz has been used on occasions, most notably participating in and completing the world famous London to Brighton Veteran Car Run, which it is eminently eligible to continue to enter. More recently it has formed part of the display representing the birthplace of Gottlieb Daimler in Schorndorf, Germany.

Now at least 112 years old, this remarkable survivor of the earliest days of the 126 year Daimler-Benz company is offered from its long term private ownership.

1901 Benz Ideal 7PS Zwei-Zylinder ,,Boxer-Motor" Vis-à-vis
Registration Nummer - Former UK Registration "L 51"
Motor Nummer 2843

Für den Erfolg des deutschen Konstrukteurs Carl Benz war das "Benz-Dreirad", mit drei sehr schmalen Drahtspeichenräder, verantwortlich. Es war sein erstes Automobil, welches von einem Verbrennungs-Motor angetrieben wurde. Es besaß einen schweren, massiven liegenden Einzylinder-Motor. Anlässlich der ersten von Carl Benz, in der Öffentlichkeit, durchgeführten Fahrt, im Herbst 1885, schrieben Deutsche Zeitungen: ,,Dieses Motorfahrzeug wird einen großen Kreis von Interessenten ansprechen, die den praktischen Nutzen des Fahrzeuges für sich zu schätzen wissen. Wie zum Beispiel Doktoren, Handelsreisende oder sportlich Begeisterte." Dieser erste Motor entwickelte eine Leistung von 0,9 PS und ermöglichte dem Benz-Dreirad eine Höchstgeschwindigkeit in Höhe von12 km/h. Ab 1892 hatten Benz Automobile vier Räder. Bei der Vorstellung des Vélociped (Vélo),1894, besaß der Einzylinder-Motor eine Leistung von 1,5 PS.

Das Vélo war das meist verkaufte Fahrzeug seiner Zeit. In der Zeit um 1895 leistete der Motor, dank seiner Weiterentwicklung 3,5 PS. Dieser erfolgreiche 3,5 PS Motor war das Rückgrat der Produktion von Benz Automobilen bis 1900. Viele andere Hersteller versuchten Benz zu kopieren. Benz konnte unterdessen Lizenzen an andere Hersteller verkaufen. So zum Bespiel an Hurtu, Star und Marshall. Das Grundprinzip der Benz Modelle beeinflusste die weltweite Automobilproduktion in der Zeit von 1885 bis 1900 grundlegend. Nach dieser Zeit stand Benz kurz vor einer Insolvenz. Die Konkurrenz der neuen Motoren nach dem System Panhard und die senkrecht stehenden und mit höherer Drehzahl laufenden Motoren von De Dion Bouton gaben den Ton an.

Benz, wie auch andere Hersteller, hielten lange an ihrer Konstruktion, die sich am Velo orientierte, fest. In einem Katalog der Benz Werke von 1898, ist das Modell "Ideal" abgebildet. Die Namensgebung oder Bezeichnung für ein Fahrzeug, welches aus eigener Kraft von A nach B fährt, ohne die Zuhilfenahme eines Pferdes, ist in vielen Sprachen verständlich und sicherlich richtig gewählt. Mit der Präsentation des Ideal wurden auch Dank der Plattform dieses Fahrzeuges erstmalig unterschiedliche Aufbauten angeboten. Im Gegensatz zum Velo konnten hier erste Varianten mit einem zweisitzigen Aufbau versehen werden, der eine zusätzliche Sitzgelegenheit gegenüberliegend für zwei weitere Personen ermöglichte. Allerdings waren die Passagiere auf dieser Sitzgelegenheit allen Widrigkeiten stärker ausgesetzt. Eine kleine Motorhaube suggerierte einen Frontmotor, obwohl der Motor noch im Heck untergebracht war. In dieser Bauart überlebte der Benz Patent Motorwagen bis 1902. Die weiteren Entwicklungen entfernten sich immer mehr vom Aussehen einer Kutsche.

Der Ideal von 1900 ist ein Übergangsmodell zwischen dem Riemen- und Kettenantrieb. Massive Holzspeichenräder sind im Jahr 1900 noch immer Standard. Jedoch übernimmt die Volleliptikfeder an der vorderen- wie auch hinteren Starrachse ihre Aufgabe der Federung ausgesprochen gut.
Kurz vor Ende der Produktion des Patent Motorwagens, bietet Benz den "Ideal" mit einem Zwei-Zylinder Motor an. Diese Bauart vereint zwei Benz Standard-Motoren die von nur einer Kurbelwelle angetrieben werden. Es entsteht die Original "Boxer-Bauart" – welche auch als "Contra-Motor" bezeichnet wird. Der Hubraum dieses Motors beträgt 2.090cm³. Dank des geringen Gewichts vom Fahrzeug, und der fast doppelten Leistung des Motors beschleunigt es auf eine Höchstgeschwindigkeit von 50 km/h. Die Benz "Contra-Motoren" Modelle werden unter Sammlern, trotz der veralteten Bauart, sehr hoch geschätzt. Aufgrund ihres modernen "Boxer-Motors" sind diese Modelle ein motortechnisches Statement ihrer Zeit.

Dieses großartige Exemplar, eines der letzten Benz Patent Motorwagen mit "Contra-Motor" war unter anderem Bestandteil einer Kollektion mehrerer Sammler in den 1930er Jahren. Aus den mitgelieferten Unterlagen geht die gesamte Historie des Fahrzeuges hervor. Bis in die Anfänge zurück. Die längste Zeit war es Bestandteil der Sammlung von Major John W. Mills im Vereinigten Königreich (U.K.). In einer Notiz ist zu lesen: "Ich kaufte das Auto im September 1937 von Mr. N. T. Bryan, Ashley Cottage, Ashley Green, Chesham, Bucks. Der Vorbesitzer war R. J. G. Nash von Fraser Nash Cars (sic)." Diese Angabe ist nicht richtig, weil R.J.G. Nash in keinerlei Verbindung zu Frazer Nash stand. Das wichtigste ist, trotz Recherche im Frazer-Nash Archiv, das seit dem benannten Herr Nash eine durchgehende Legitimation für die London - Brighton Fahrt und eine Veteranen Nummer vorliegt. Das Datum des Fahrzeugerwerbs ist sicherlich richtig, ebenso die Behauptung von Major Mills an der berühmten London – Brighton Fahrt 1937 und 1938 teilgenommen zu haben, da er im Programm 1938 als Besitzer genannt ist und er die "appropriate age class" (Klasse - dem Alter entsprechender Zustand) gewonnen hat.

In der Zeit vor dem 2. Weltkrieg erlangte der Benz die Aufmerksamkeit des Veteran Car Club of Great Britain. Hierbei wurde sehr früh im Zusammenhang mit Registrierung das Fahrzeugalter und somit das Gestehungsjahr 1901 bestätigt. Das Fahrzeug erhielt das 64. Zertifikat von dieser Institution, 1937, ausgestellt und zugewiesen. Von 1946 bis 1960 belegen Notizen von Herrn Mills, dass er den "Contra-Motor Wagen" in dieser Zeit an einer Vielzahl von unterschiedlichen Veranstaltungen, darin enthalten mehrere Teilnahmen an der London – Brighton Fahrt, gefahren ist.

In der Zeit von 1971 bis 1972 wurde das Fahrzeug einer umfangreichen Restaurierung unterzogen. Ausgeführt wurde diese von A. Farquhar and P.D. Woodley's Automobile Restorations of Leicester. Anhand einer sehr detaillierten Rechnung für den beträchtlichen Preis in Höhe von £1,900. Es wurden alle notwendigen Arbeiten am Fahrzeug durchgeführt, da sich eine gewisse Materialermüdung in der gesamten Zeit eingestellt hatte. In dieser Restauration enthalten, eine komplette Auffrischung des Aufbaus mit vereinzelten Ausbesserungsarbeiten am Holz und einer umfangreichen Überarbeitung der Mechanik.

Belegt anhand von Aufzeichnungen und Kopien aus einem alten Britischen Register, blieb der Benz bis 1973 im Besitz von Major Mills. Ab diesem Zeitpunkt ist John Hattrell and John Leech genannt, bevor er die in Hände des bekannten Sammlers Bernard Garrett gelangte. Der jetzige Anbieter des Fahrzeugs erwarb den "Ideal" im März 1980, vor nunmehr 34 Jahren.

Zusätzlich zu der dokumentierten Historie des Fahrzeuges ist das Nummernschild ein Indiz und Beleg für eine sehr frühe Zulassung auf den britischen Inseln, in der Region Welsh Glamorgan, welches durch das "L" und die sehr niedrige Zahl "51" gekennzeichnet ist.

Nach mehr als drei Jahrzehnten wird der Benz nun angeboten und ist prädestiniert als ein Fahrzeug, welches für das weltberühmte London to Brighton Veteran Car Run Over eine Startberechtigung erhält. Erst kürzlich nahm dieses Fahrzeug an einer Präsentation am Geburtsort von Gottlieb Daimler in Schorndorf (Deutschland) teil.

Im Alter von 113 Jahren, in denen das Fahrzeug gealtert und überlebt hat und einen großen Teil der 126 jährigen Geschichte der Firma Daimler-Benz begleitet hat, wird es nun aus einem langjährigen Privatbesitz angeboten.
Activities
Auction information

This auction is now finished. If you are interested in consigning in future auctions, please contact the specialist department. If you have queries about lots purchased in this auction, please contact customer services.

Buyers' Obligations

ALL BIDDERS MUST AGREE THAT THEY HAVE READ AND UNDERSTOOD BONHAMS' CONDITIONS OF SALE AND AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THEM, AND AGREE TO PAY THE BUYER'S PREMIUM AND ANY OTHER CHARGES MENTIONED IN THE NOTICE TO BIDDERS. THIS AFFECTS THE BIDDERS LEGAL RIGHTS.

If you have any complaints or questions about the Conditions of Sale, please contact your nearest customer services team.

Buyers' Premium and Charges

Like the vast majority of auctioneers Bonhams charge what is known as a Buyer's Premium. Buyer's Premium on all Automobilia lots will adhere to Bonhams group policy:

25% up to £50,000 of hammer price,
20% from £50,001 to £1,000,000 of hammer price,
and 12% on the balance thereafter. This applies to each lot purchased and is subject to VAT.

For Motor Cars and Motorcycles a 15% Buyer's Premium is payable on the first £50,000 of the final Hammer Price of each Lot, and 12% on any amount by which the Hammer Price exceeds £50,000. VAT at the standard rate is payable on the Premium by all Buyers, unless otherwise stated.

Some lots may be subject to VAT on the Hammer Price. These lots will be clearly marked with the relevant symbol printed beside the lot number in the catalogue.

Shipping Notices

For information and estimates on domestic and international shipping as well as export licences please contact Bonhams Shipping Department.

Contacts
  1. Motor Cars (Europe)
    General enquiries
    Bonhams
    Work
  2. Philip Kantor
    General enquiries
    Bonhams
    Work
    Boulevard Saint-Michel 101
    Brussels, Belgium 1040
    Work +33 1 42 61 10 11
    FaxFax: +33 1 42 61 10 15
Similar Items