A rare 17th century pine panel back open armchair, Scottish Circa 1660-80

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Lot 210
A rare 17th century pine panel back open armchair, Scottish
Circa 1660-80

Sold for £ 8,125 (US$ 10,150) inc. premium

The Oak Interior

19 Apr 2012, 11:00 BST

Chester

A rare 17th century pine panel back open armchair, Scottish
Circa 1660-80
The shape influenced by the French caqueteuse, the back carved with two chip-carved panels, within conforming carved rails, the over hanging top-rail with shaped ends again with chip carving centred by a single flowerhead, the flat scroll-ended and outsplayed arms on ball-turned front uprights embracing a boarded seat, on conforming turned front legs joined by plain stretchers, 63cm wide x 51cm deep x 102.5cm high, (24.5in wide x 20in deep x 40in high)

Footnotes

  • Illustrated V.Chinnery, Oak Furniture The British Tradition, p.467, fig.4:110. Described as Scottish, East Coast, c.1680.

    See pp.460-467 for a discussion of the Franco-Scottish culture which produced this type of armchair, and figs. 4:96-112.

    See also Dr. B. Cotton, Scottish Vernacular Furniture, pp.147-149.
    Inspired by French caqueteuse designs, many 17th century Scottish chairs exhibit a narrow back compared to a wider front, along with the distinctive shaped, outsplayed arms. The use of local woods, pine, or fir; the double-panelled back, see figs. 243, 244, 245, ibid., pp.148-149; the flat top-rail which over hangs the uprights; the distinctive chip or gauge carving; and heavy ball, or sometimes ring-turning to the front supports, figs. 243 and 245, are further characteristics associated with Scottish 17th century chairs which are fully demonstrated here.

    Fine examples also exist made from the new imported exotic hardwoods. Dr Cotton, ibid p.148., refers to Aberdeen, as the largest Scottish port in the 16th/17th century, with a free flow of timber, as the major centre for their production. Many of the known examples are dated to around 1660-71, with the Trade Hospital at Trinity Hall, Aberdeen, having a mahogany example dated to 1661, the earliest recorded use of mahogany in Britain.

Saleroom notices

  • Provenance: Purchased by the current vendor, Sotheby's, London. The 'Property of An English Private Collector', May 1974, lot 156 (£420).
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A rare 17th century pine panel back open armchair, Scottish Circa 1660-80
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