Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45

This lot has been removed from the website, please contact customer services for more information

Lot 148
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell, 1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon
Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45

€ 145,000 - 175,000
US$ 160,000 - 200,000
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell
1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon
Coachwork by Barker & Co

Chassis no. 140MY
Engine no. GF45
Body no. 9988

The car offered here was supplied new to Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell, one of Great Britain's foremost sporting motorists, who broke the World Land Speed record on no fewer than nine occasions between 1929 and 1935.
Campbell, a Lloyds underwriter, had cut his competitive teeth in the London to Edinburgh motorcycle trials, gaining three Gold Medals in this challenging event between 1906 and 1908. He developed an interest in flying and in 1910 began racing cars at Brooklands. Campbell served in the Royal Flying Corps during WWI and in 1923 took to record-breaking with the first of his famous 'Bluebird' cars, named after Maeterlinck's play L'Oiseau Bleu (The Blue Bird), which he had seen in 1912. He was knighted for his achievements in 1931.
Malcolm Campbell was a noted connoisseur of fine cars and must have found the specification of the Phantom II Continental particularly appealing. The Phantom II had been introduced in 1929 as a successor to the New Phantom (retrospectively Phantom I) with deliveries commencing in September of that year. Unlike its predecessor, which inherited its underpinnings from the preceding 40/50hp model, the Silver Ghost, the Phantom II employed an entirely new chassis laid out along the lines of that of the smaller 20hp Rolls-Royce. Built in two wheelbase lengths - 144" and 150" - this new low-slung frame, with its radiator set well back, enabled coachbuilders to body the car in the modern idiom, creating sleeker designs than the upright ones of the past.
The engine too had come in for extensive revision. The PI's cylinder dimensions and basic layout - two blocks of three cylinders, with an aluminium cylinder head common to both blocks - were retained, but the combustion chambers had been redesigned and the 'head was now of the cross-flow type, with inlet and exhaust manifolds on opposite sides. The magneto/coil dual ignition system remained the same as on the PI.
The result of these engine changes was greatly enhanced performance, particularly of the Continental model, and the ability to accommodate weightier coachwork. Designed around the short (144") Phantom II chassis and introduced in 1930, the Continental was claimed to be 'ideal for the enthusiastic owner-driver' and featured revised rear suspension, higher axle ratio and lowered steering column. By the end of production the magnificent Phantom II Continental was good for 95mph. 'Powerful, docile, delightfully easy to control and a thoroughbred, it behaves in a manner which is difficult to convey without seeming to over-praise,' declared The Motor after testing a PII Continental in March 1934.
Highly favoured by prominent coachbuilders, the Phantom II chassis provided the platform for some of the truly outstanding designs of its day and this Continental model wears handsome 'standardised touring saloon' coachwork by Barker & Co. Chassis number 140MY'was supplied new to Sir Malcolm Campbell on 28th March 1933 as a completed car, his first Phantom II Continental ('55GX') being accepted in part exchange. After the sale of '55GX' Rolls-Royce ended up making a loss on the deal, but presumably considered this a small price to pay for Campbell's continued patronage, so popular was he at that time. Indeed, at around this time Campbell wrote Rolls-Royce's official brochure for the Phantom II entitled 'The best Rolls-Royce yet produced'.
Registered 'AGO 1', the PII was supplied with a considerable compliment of accessories including five Ace wheel discs, wireless set, front and rear cushions, fire extinguisher, spotlight, near-side cubby hole for insurance documents, 9" over-length exhaust pipe and a metal box in the chassis frame, presumably for tools. The colour specified was blue (like '55GX') with matching leather trim and black roof. Campbell also specified a Klaxon horn, a Bosch horn and a siren, the latter being removed from '55GX' and fitted to '140MY'. Clearly Captain Campbell was determined that absolutely no one, not even the profoundly deaf, would get in his way!
The accompanying copy chassis card lists six subsequent owners, the third of whom - Lord Normanton of Somerley House near Ringwood, Hampshire - appears to have acquired the Rolls-Royce in 1936. The last owner named is one A W Wallace Turner of Hartley Whitney, Hampshire (from October 1951).
Notes on file written by Michael di Cosola of Sarasota, Florida, USA state that the Campbell family gave the car to the RAF during WW2 and that he (di Cosola) bought it from the widow of a Tom Jones when the latter died in the 1980s. (It should be noted that the claim about RAF ownership is contradicted by the chassis card and cannot be true). In 1983 Mr di Cosola started to restore the Rolls-Royce but died while the work was in progress. His widow put the car up for auction where it was bought by an Englishman and brought back to the UK (see customs declaration on file). Despite the best of intentions the new owner failed to make any progress with the rebuild and ten years later the car was sold to the current vendor, who has spent the last three years completing its restoration.
Work carried out has included stripping, cleaning and repainting the chassis, reinstalling all ancillaries and fitting new tyres, spring gaiters, exhaust system and André Hartford shock absorbers. The engine has been re-bored and fitted with new pistons, cam followers and clutch; a reconditioned and white-metalled crankshaft; and a new cylinder head complete with valves, guides, springs, etc. The body has been refinished in Saxe Blue metallic while the interior boasts restored brightwork, wood trim, dashboard instruments and column controls plus new headlining, carpets and blue leather upholstery.
Suitable for touring in the grand manner and any number of prestigious concours and other events, this freshly restored Phantom II is offered with restoration invoices and current UK roadworthiness certificate (MoT).

La voiture présentée ici fut vendue neuve au Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell, un des plus grands sportifs et pilotes automobiles britanniques, titulaire à neuf reprises entre 1929 et 1935 du record mondial de vitesse sur terre.

Campbell, membre de Lloyds, avait débuté sa carrière de pilote amateur dans les épreuves motocyclistes Londres – Edimbourg en remportant trois médailles d'or dans cette difficile épreuve de 1906 à 1908. Il s'intéressa à l'aviation naissante et, en 1910, commença à courir à l'autodrome de Brooklands. Campbell servit dans le Royal Flying Corps (future RAF) pendant la Grande Guerre et, en 1923, s'attaqua aux records de vitesse pure avec la première de ses voitures baptisées « Bluebird » en référence à la pièce de Maeterlinck L'oiseau bleu qu'il avait vue en 1912. Il fut anobli pour ses exploits en 1931.

Malcolm Campbell, fin connaisseur de belles voitures, a dû juger les caractéristiques de la Rolls-Royce Phantom II Continental particulièrement attirantes. La Phantom II était apparue en 1929 pour remplacer la New Phantom (appelée a posteriori Phantom I), les livraisons commençant en septembre de cette année-là. Contrairement à sa devancière qui héritait partiellement du châssis de la précédente 40/50hp, la Silver Ghost, la Phantom II bénéficiait d'un tout nouveau châssis inspiré de celui de la plus petite 20hp de Rolls-Royce. Produit selon deux empattements, 144 et 150 pouces, soit respectivement 3,65 m et 3,81 m, ce cadre surbaissé doté d'un radiateur plus reculé permit aux carrossiers de produire des caisses modernes avec des lignes plus élancées que celles des modèles antérieurs beaucoup plus hauts.

Le moteur avait aussi bénéficié d'une importante refonte. Les cotes et l'architecture de la Phantom I – deux blocs de trois cylindres coiffés d'une seule culasse en aluminium – furent conservées, mais avec des chambres de combustion redessinées, la culasse étant dorénavant du type cross flow avec l'admission d'un côté et l'échappement de l'autre. Le système d'allumage double à magnéto et batterie-bobine de la Phantom I fut conservé. Les performances de ce nouveau groupe furent grandement améliorées, notamment sur le modèle Continental, avec possibilité d'accepter des carrosseries plus lourdes. Conçue sur le châssis court de 144 pouces et introduite en 1930, la Continental fut jugée « idéale pour le propriétaire conduisant lui-même » avec ses suspensions révisées, son rapport final plus long et sa colonne de direction abaissée. En fin de production, la Phantom II Continental atteignait 145 km/h. « Puissante, docile, très facile à contrôler et vrai pur sang, elle se comporte d'un façon telle qu'il est difficile d'en rendre compte sans tomber dans la louange » écrivit The Motor après l'essai d'une Continental en mars 1934.

Très apprécié par les meilleurs carrossiers, le châssis Phantom II servit de base à quelques créations véritablement extraordinaires en leur temps et ce modèle de Continental est habillé d'une élégante caisse de « berline de tourisme normale » signée Barker & Co. Le châssis n° 140 MY complètement carrossé fut livré neuf le 28 mars 1933 à Sir Malcolm Campbell qui fit reprendre sa première Phantom II Continental (n° 55 GX). Après la revente de 55 GX, Rolls-Royce enregistra une perte, mais considéra probablement que ce n'était pas cher payé pour conserver la clientèle de Campbell dont la notoriété était à son apogée à cette époque. En réalité, Campbell rédigea pour Rolls-Royce la brochure officielle de la Phantom II intitulée « The best Rolls-Royce ever produced ».

Immatriculée « AGO 1 » la Phantom II fut livrée équipée d'un grand nombre d'accessoires dont cinq roues à disque Ace, un récepteur de radio, des coussins avant et arrière, un extincteur, un projecteur longue portée, un vide-poche du côté gauche pour ranger les documents d'assurance, un échappement allongé de 22 cm et un coffre en tôle dans le châssis probablement pour des outils. La couleur commandée était bleu (comme 5 GX) avec sellerie cuir assortie et toit noir. Campbell spécifia aussi un avertisseur Klaxon, un avertisseur Bosch et une sirène, cette dernière étant démontée de 55 GX pour être réinstallée sur 140 MY. Campbell était visiblement décidé à ce que personne, pas même les sourds profonds, ne lui bloque le passage !

La copie de la fiche du châssis jointe indique six propriétaires ultérieurs dont le troisième, Lord Normanton, de Somerley House près Ringwood (Hampshire), semble avoir acquis la voiture en 1936. Le dernier propriétaire nommé est un certain A. W. Wallace Turner, de Hartley Whitney, Hampshire, à compter d'octobre 1951.

Les notes figurant au dossier rédigées par Michael di Cosola, de Sarasota (Floride, USA) précisent que la famille Campbell confia la voiture à la RAF pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale et que lui-même (di Cosola) l'acheta à la veuve d'un certain Tom Jones après le décès de ce dernier dans les années 1980. (Il faut préciser ici que l'affirmation d'un éventuel don à la RAF est contredite par la liste de la fiche du châssis et qu'elle est donc fausse.) En 1983, M. di Cosola commença la restauration de la Rolls-Royce, mais décéda avant la fin des travaux. Sa veuve mit la voiture aux enchères. Rachetée par un Anglais, la voiture revint au Royaume-Uni (voir documents douaniers dans le dossier). Malgré les meilleures intentions du nouveau propriétaire, la remise en état ne fit aucun progrès et, dix ans plus tard, la voiture fut vendue au propriétaire actuel qui consacra ces trois dernières années à compléter la restauration.

Les travaux concernèrent le démontage, le nettoyage et la peinture du châssis, la réinstallation de tous les accessoires, le montage de pneus, de gaines de ressorts, d'un échappement et d'amortisseurs André Hartford neufs. Le moteur a été réalésé et équipé de pistons, de poussoirs de soupapes et d'un embrayage neufs, d'un vilebrequin reconditionné, de coussinets refaits en métal blanc et d'une culasse neuve avec soupapes, guides, ressorts, etc, neufs. La carrosserie a été repeinte en Bleu Saxe métallisé et l'intérieur a été rééquipé d'ornements brillants, de boiseries, d'instruments de bord et de commandes restaurés, et d'un ciel de toit, de tapis et d'une sellerie en cuir bleu neufs.

Destinée au tourisme en grand style et aux plus prestigieuses manifestations réservées aux automobiles de collection, cette Phantom II tout juste restaurée est accompagnée de son dossier de factures et de son certificat de contrôle technique du MOT.
Contacts
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Originally owned by Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell,1933 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon  Chassis no. 140MY Engine no. GF45
Auction information

This auction is now finished. If you are interested in consigning in future auctions, please contact the specialist department. If you have queries about lots purchased in this auction, please contact customer services.

Buyers' Obligations

ALL BIDDERS MUST AGREE THAT THEY HAVE READ AND UNDERSTOOD BONHAMS' CONDITIONS OF SALE AND AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THEM, AND AGREE TO PAY THE BUYER'S PREMIUM AND ANY OTHER CHARGES MENTIONED IN THE NOTICE TO BIDDERS. THIS AFFECTS THE BIDDERS LEGAL RIGHTS.

If you have any complaints or questions about the Conditions of Sale, please contact your nearest customer services team.

Buyers' Premium and Charges

Like the vast majority of auctioneers Bonhams charge what is known as a Buyer's Premium. Buyer's Premium on all Automobilia lots will adhere to Bonhams group policy:

25% up to £50,000 of hammer price,
20% from £50,001 to £1,000,000 of hammer price,
and 12% on the balance thereafter. This applies to each lot purchased and is subject to VAT.

For Motor Cars and Motorcycles a 15% Buyer's Premium is payable on the first £50,000 of the final Hammer Price of each Lot, and 12% on any amount by which the Hammer Price exceeds £50,000. VAT at the standard rate is payable on the Premium by all Buyers, unless otherwise stated.

Some lots may be subject to VAT on the Hammer Price. These lots will be clearly marked with the relevant symbol printed beside the lot number in the catalog.

Shipping Notices

For information and estimates on domestic and international shipping as well as export licenses please contact Bonhams Shipping Department.