One of only three known survivors,1937 Singer 1.5-Litre 'B37' Sports  Chassis no. 1755H Engine no. S2008H

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Lot 490
One of only three known survivors,1937 Singer 1.5-Litre 'B37' Sports
Registration no. ANR 685 Chassis no. 1755H Engine no. S2008H

Sold for £ 43,300 (US$ 52,520) inc. premium
One of only three known survivors
1937 Singer 1.5-Litre 'B37' Sports
Registration no. ANR 685
Chassis no. 1755H
Engine no. S2008H

Footnotes

  • Coventry cycle manufacturer Singer first ventured into the world of powered transport in 1901, making tricycles and motorcycles. Tri-cars soon followed, with motor car production proper commencing in 1905 using proprietary engines. The first Singer-powered model - the 10hp - debuted at The Cycle & Motor Cycle Show in November 1912. Because it weighed less than 7cwt and was under 1,100cc in capacity (actually 1,096cc) the 10hp Singer was classed as a cyclecar, which explains the choice of venue. But unlike the majority of contemporary cyclecars, which were flimsy affairs of limited practicality, the new baby Singer was a proper light car and thus a development of immense significance. Priced at £185 at launch and produced for more than a decade, the Ten was an immense commercial success for Singer and is regarded as a landmark model in the history of the British motor industry.
    With its foundations as a major motor manufacturer established, Singer went from strength to strength and by the end of the 1920s was Britain's third largest car producer behind Austin and Morris. Like rivals MG, Singer recognised the validity of the adage 'win on Sunday, sell on Monday' and pursued an active competitions programme during the 1930s, commencing with the Sports and Le Mans versions of the Nine that had been introduced in 1932. The Le Mans had resulted from a successful venture into endurance racing, when a Nine Sports took 13th place in the 1933 Le Mans 24-Hour Race. But it was in trials events that the sporting Nines proved particularly effective, successfully challenging the previously dominant MGs.
    Capitalising on the Nine's success, in May 1933 Singer had introduced a 1.5-Litre Sports based on the existing six-cylinder 14hp model, and predictably followed that up with a Le Mans version in '34. The six-cylinder 1.5-Litre's 7th and 8th place finishes at Le Mans in 1934 would prove to be the highlight of its endurance racing career, for the car was no match for the Aston Martins and Rileys. In trials, rallies and other competitions though, the 1.5-litre Singer was a force to be reckoned with.
    In January 1937 the company announced a completely new 1.5-litre sports model, which was to be powered by a slightly downsized version of the 1,525cc overhead-camshaft four-cylinder engine of the recently introduced Twelve. With bore/stroke dimensions of 68x103mm for a capacity of 1,496cc, the 'B37' (as it came to be known) just crept into the 1,500cc racing class. The B37 engine incorporated a forged crankshaft to withstand the greater power it was expected to produce, and in addition featured twin SU carburettors and a Scintilla Vertex magneto. With a power output of 59bhp, the new 1.5-Litre was more powerful than its six-cylinder predecessor. The immensely strong chassis consisted of two box-section side rails braced by a combination of tubular and channel-section cross members, and was under-slung at the rear where the axle was particularly well supported. The car's competition credentials were enhanced by a fly-off handbrake, twin spare wheels and a 'Hill-Holder'. Sadly, only 12 examples of this promising design had been produced when the model was dropped shortly after its introduction, a casualty of the range's rationalisation that followed Singer's financial restructuring. Of the 12, four were used for racing, four retained as spares and four sold as road cars.
    According to the Singer Owners Club Archive, 'ANR 685' is believed to be the sole B37 road car that still retains its original bodywork. The car was purchased new by one Ernest Joseph Black from Sturgess & Sons, Leicester. A resident of Kibworth in Leicestershire, Mr Black was in the Home Guard during WW2 and the Singer was used to transport troops locally on a trailer (see photograph on file). In February 1955 another Kibworth resident, George Glover, bought the car and used it sparingly before consigning it to barn storage. After much persuasion, George Black sold the Singer in 1979 to the current owner, yet another a Kibworth resident, who embarked on a full 'body off' restoration that took until 1982 to complete.
    Much rallied and shown since then with the Singer Owners Club, 'ANR 685' presents well and is 'on the button', its engine displaying good oil pressure and running well. This beautiful example of one of the 1930s rarest and most desirable sports cars comes with Singer Motors Ltd correspondence, restoration photographs, old-style logbook, MoT/tax to May 2012 and Swansea V5 registration document.

Saleroom notices

  • The registration number for this motor car is ANR 654 not as catalogued.
Contacts
One of only three known survivors,1937 Singer 1.5-Litre 'B37' Sports  Chassis no. 1755H Engine no. S2008H
One of only three known survivors,1937 Singer 1.5-Litre 'B37' Sports  Chassis no. 1755H Engine no. S2008H
One of only three known survivors,1937 Singer 1.5-Litre 'B37' Sports  Chassis no. 1755H Engine no. S2008H
One of only three known survivors,1937 Singer 1.5-Litre 'B37' Sports  Chassis no. 1755H Engine no. S2008H
One of only three known survivors,1937 Singer 1.5-Litre 'B37' Sports  Chassis no. 1755H Engine no. S2008H
One of only three known survivors,1937 Singer 1.5-Litre 'B37' Sports  Chassis no. 1755H Engine no. S2008H
One of only three known survivors,1937 Singer 1.5-Litre 'B37' Sports  Chassis no. 1755H Engine no. S2008H
One of only three known survivors,1937 Singer 1.5-Litre 'B37' Sports  Chassis no. 1755H Engine no. S2008H
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