The Ex-Porsche Cars Northwest, 1967 Kent 300 Trans-Am Under 2-Liter Class Winning,1967 Porsche 911S Sport Kit II  Chassis no. 307828S
Lot 648
The Ex-Porsche Cars Northwest, 1967 Kent 300 Trans-Am Under 2-Liter Class Winning, 1967 Porsche 911S Sport Kit II
Chassis no. 307828S
Sold for US$ 210,500 inc. premium

Lot Details
The Ex-Porsche Cars Northwest, 1967 Kent 300 Trans-Am Under 2-Liter Class Winning,1967 Porsche 911S Sport Kit II  Chassis no. 307828S The Ex-Porsche Cars Northwest, 1967 Kent 300 Trans-Am Under 2-Liter Class Winning,1967 Porsche 911S Sport Kit II  Chassis no. 307828S The Ex-Porsche Cars Northwest, 1967 Kent 300 Trans-Am Under 2-Liter Class Winning,1967 Porsche 911S Sport Kit II  Chassis no. 307828S The Ex-Porsche Cars Northwest, 1967 Kent 300 Trans-Am Under 2-Liter Class Winning,1967 Porsche 911S Sport Kit II  Chassis no. 307828S The Ex-Porsche Cars Northwest, 1967 Kent 300 Trans-Am Under 2-Liter Class Winning,1967 Porsche 911S Sport Kit II  Chassis no. 307828S The Ex-Porsche Cars Northwest, 1967 Kent 300 Trans-Am Under 2-Liter Class Winning,1967 Porsche 911S Sport Kit II  Chassis no. 307828S The Ex-Porsche Cars Northwest, 1967 Kent 300 Trans-Am Under 2-Liter Class Winning,1967 Porsche 911S Sport Kit II  Chassis no. 307828S The Ex-Porsche Cars Northwest, 1967 Kent 300 Trans-Am Under 2-Liter Class Winning,1967 Porsche 911S Sport Kit II  Chassis no. 307828S
The Ex-Porsche Cars Northwest, 1967 Kent 300 Trans-Am Under 2-Liter Class Winning
1967 Porsche 911S Sport Kit II
Chassis no. 307828S
When Porsche introduced the 911 series, it knew it had to enter the new six-cylinder model in competition. The factory’s efforts, however, were largely confined to Europe. It was left to privateer teams to campaign the 911 in the US. In spite of handily winning the 1966 SCCA D production National Championship at Riverside with a 911S, Porsche found it was still swimming upstream among American enthusiasts, especially skeptical 356 owners. With the new 1967 model 911S priced at $7000, US sales were lackluster. Along with other US Porsche sales executives, the late Terry Bucholtz, then General Manager of Porsche Cars Northwest in Beaverton, Oregon, travelled to Stuttgart to examine the new model. Bucholtz later wrote that he wanted to convince Porsche to produce a handful of lightweight 911S coupes that would compete in SCCA racing around the country and thus improve Porsche’s image – and hopefully boost sales. Since Porsche was already campaigning its lightweight 911R prototypes at home, it was not a difficult decision for company management.

Porsche’s racing department went to work developing a list of special competition-oriented parts that could be homologated in the 911 series. This list became known colloquially as the “Sports Purposes” catalog, and the items therein could legally be installed in 911s raced in SCCA’s tough C Production class, where the six-cylinder model had been placed after its too-easy title chase the year before. Thus the “Rally Kit Option 9552” and several “Tuning Packages” came into being.

Included in the Rally kits were Recaro racing seats, a bolt-in rollover bar, skid plates, deletion of most of the interior trim including the rear jump seats, a smaller-diameter steering wheel, a dead pedal for the driver’s left foot, a 100-liter fuel tank with through-the-hood filler, plastic side and rear windows, Koni adjustable shock absorbers, larger swaybars, aluminum 906 brake calipers with competition pads, specially-prepared cylinder heads, carefully matched manifolds, a lightweight flywheel and racing clutch, stronger transmission internals including a 904 mainshaft, a broad range of gears and rear-axle ratios, and a limited-slip differential. The Tuning Kits provided carburetion and exhaust parts that boosted the two-liter engine’s output from the standard 911S’s 160 hp to well above 180. Only the fact that these few special 911Ss were built with standard-gauge sheet-metal and a few standard trim pieces differed them from the factory’s featherweight 911R racers.

This light ivory coupe, chassis number ‘307828S’, arrived at Porsche Cars Northwest on April 12, 1967, fitted with engine #961685 and transmission #2001. A letter from Porsche dated 8 March 1989 and signed Jurgen Barth confirms these details, listing ‘rally equipment’, ‘sport kit II’, and ‘limited slip differential’ as options fitted at the factory. Upon delivery, Bucholtz sat down with his service manager, Tom Dawkins, and a local driver, Gary Wright, who had been racing very successfully with a PCNW-backed 356, and laid out plans for the upcoming season. Their goal was to enter as many SCCA production races in the Pacific Northwest as they could, and if possible, take a crack at the new Trans-American Championship, where the 911 was allowed to compete as a ‘sedan’ due to a loophole in the series rules. ‘828S’ was stripped to its bare tub and readied for SCCA competition. A key step was replacing the car’s original 4.5” x 15” wheels with 7-inch-wide American Racing magnesium alloy rims. Wright made the car a winner right out of the box, and drove ‘828S’ to the SCCA Pacific Northwest C Production season championship, qualifying for a spot in the National Runoffs at Daytona that November. Dawkins also shared driving duties, taking the wheel in SCCA Regional contests. Before Daytona, however, came the west coast swing of the Trans-Am series.

Strangely, only the 130 hp base model 911 was allowed to compete in the Trans-Am, so Bucholtz engaged in a bit of sleight-of-hand, altering the chassis number and trim of ‘828S’ to delete the tell-tale ‘S’, and the tech inspectors never caught on. Documents accompanying the car include a notarized 1988 letter from Bucholtz confirming these details. Upon installation of a blue-printed and carefully tuned base 911 engine, the team entered the Kent 300, a grueling 135-lap enduro at Pacific Raceways near Seattle, Washington, in October. Wright – with co-driver Mike Eyerly – finished a strong sixth overall, but more importantly, first in the Under-Two-Liter category, clinching for Porsche the season U-2 Trans-Am title.

Returning to Portland, the PCNW crew reinstalled the higher-powered 911S engine and headed for Daytona, where Wright would finish third overall behind Alan Johnson and Davey Jordan in a stunning Porsche 1-2-3 sweep of C Production over the favored Datsun 2000 and Lotus Elan roadsters.

With the 1967 season in the books, Bucholtz sold ‘828S’ to Wright, who continued to race the car in SCCA events. In 1969, Wright sold the car to another Portland driver, Todd Webb. Webb entered the car at the 1969 Daytona 24 Hours but failed to finish. It also ran at the 1969 ARRC at Daytona, finishing 5th. By 1970, however, ‘828S’ was no longer competitive against newer, larger-engined 911s, so Webb retired the car to street use and occasional autocrossing. Around 1973, the car suffered an engine failure and Webb traded it for a 911SC. At that time, the car had recorded barely 6300 miles. ‘828S’ would pass through several other owners before Florida Porsche collector and former IMSA driver Scott Tyler acquired it in 1988. Other projects relegated ‘828S’, by then disassembled, to a corner of Tyler’s shop for over 15 years. In 2003, Tyler sold the car to another Floridian, Ross Bleustein, who entrusted it to Scooter Gable in St. Petersburg for a painstaking restoration that was completed in 2005 by DTM Engineering. Resplendent in its 1967 Trans-Am livery, and with a period-correct 2.0 liter racing engine installed, ‘828S’ returned to Portland, site of its first victories, appearing at the 2006 Porsche Parade’s Historic Concours d’Elegance.

It was fairly common practice for early 911 race cars to be steadily updated and modified to remain competitive, therefore, finding such a successful and fully-documented 911 in its as-originally-raced form today is quite rare. ‘307828S’ is presented here as it was in almost every detail at the Kent 300 Trans-Am, where it defeated every other under-two-liter competitor, and finished ahead of many five-liter Pony Cars as well. It would be a fine addition to any Porsche collection, and is eminently eligible for most vintage racing events.

Saleroom notices

  • The vendor has provided us with an original race team jacket from Porsche Car Northwest which will accompany this Lot. The vendor also has other artifacts from the car's history including 8mm film footage of the car racing in period, these items can be supplied by the vendor upon successful sale of this Porsche.
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