Charles Edward Dixon, R.I. (British, 1872-1934) The White Star liner Germanic heading down the Mersey outward bound for New York

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Lot 94
Charles Edward Dixon, R.I.
(British, 1872-1934)
The White Star liner Germanic heading down the Mersey outward bound for New York

Sold for £ 1,440 (US$ 1,795) inc. premium
Charles Edward Dixon, R.I. (British, 1872-1934)
The White Star liner Germanic heading down the Mersey outward bound for New York
signed 'Charles Dixon' and dated 97 (lower left)
pen, ink and watercolour heightened with white
27.3 x 61cm (10 3/4 x 24in).

Footnotes

  • Built by Harland & Wolff at Belfast, the White Star liner Germanic was launched on 15th July 1874 and completed in the spring of the following year. A handsome two-funnelled four-masted single-screw iron steamer, she was registered at 5,008 tons gross (3,150 net) and measured 455 feet in length with a 45 foot beam. Fitted with two 2-cylinder tandem compound engines driven by steam from 8 double boilers coal-fired by 32 furnaces, she could cruise at 16 knots and had accommodation for 220 First and 1,500 Steerage passengers.

    Leaving Liverpool on her maiden voyage to New York on 30th May 1875, she soon proved herself by taking the 'Blue Riband' for the fastest eastbound crossing that July which she then surpassed with an even faster time in February 1876. This second record established her as one of the finest steamships on the North Atlantic run and she rarely sailed thereafter with any empty cabins. Modernised in 1895, she survived a partial capsizing in New York during a severe blizzard in February 1899 but was soon righted, pumped dry and finally returned to service after four months refitting.

    Retired by White Star in 1903, she was first transferred to the American Line and then to the Dominion Line, the latter renaming her Ottawa. Sold to the Turkish government in 1910 for use as a troop transport, she was renamed Gul Djemal and was employed to rush troops to Gallipoli in April 1915 where she was torpedoed by the British submarine E14 on 3rd May. Subsequently raised and repaired, she survived the Great War, enjoyed a brief return to the North Atlantic carrying Turkish emigrants in 1920-21, and then settled into mostly eastern Mediterranean sailings until 1949. Following a short spell as a storeship at Istanbul, latterly she became a floating hotel until finally scrapped at the end of 1950 after a remarkable seventy-five year career at sea.
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