The Ex-JCB team, Trevor Taylor, Peter Sadler,1965 Lotus-Ford Type 30 Group 7 Sports-Racing Two-Seater  Chassis no. 30 S2 09 Engine no. XE93532
Lot 205
The Ex-JCB team, Trevor Taylor, Peter Sadler, 1965 Lotus-Ford Type 30 Group 7 Sports-Racing Two-Seater
Chassis no. 30 S2 09 Engine no. XE93532
€ 160,000 - 200,000
US$ 180,000 - 230,000

Lot Details
The Ex-JCB team, Trevor Taylor, Peter Sadler,1965 Lotus-Ford Type 30 Group 7 Sports-Racing Two-Seater  Chassis no. 30 S2 09 Engine no. XE93532 The Ex-JCB team, Trevor Taylor, Peter Sadler,1965 Lotus-Ford Type 30 Group 7 Sports-Racing Two-Seater  Chassis no. 30 S2 09 Engine no. XE93532 The Ex-JCB team, Trevor Taylor, Peter Sadler,1965 Lotus-Ford Type 30 Group 7 Sports-Racing Two-Seater  Chassis no. 30 S2 09 Engine no. XE93532 The Ex-JCB team, Trevor Taylor, Peter Sadler,1965 Lotus-Ford Type 30 Group 7 Sports-Racing Two-Seater  Chassis no. 30 S2 09 Engine no. XE93532 The Ex-JCB team, Trevor Taylor, Peter Sadler,1965 Lotus-Ford Type 30 Group 7 Sports-Racing Two-Seater  Chassis no. 30 S2 09 Engine no. XE93532
The Ex-JCB team, Trevor Taylor, Peter Sadler
1965 Lotus-Ford Type 30 Group 7 Sports-Racing Two-Seater
Chassis no. 30 S2 09
Engine no. XE93532

Footnotes

  • Sports car racing in Britain had seen a tremendous resurgence through 1964, mirroring the American adoption of ‘big-banger’ V8-engined cars. Lola were working on a new American V8-engined car – to emerge as their T70 – and in competition Colin Chapman of Lotus planned his
    ‘big-banger’ Group 7 sports-racing design – the Lotus 30.

    He based it upon a novel backbone chassis derived from experience with the small-capacity road-going production sports Lotus Elan. The
    backbone chassis for the Lotus 30 was a deep box section beam,
    considerably flanged and baffled for rigidity and panelled initially in
    20-gauge mild-steel sheet. It was only 6 inches wide at the top,
    91⁄2-inches at the bottom, and 12-inches deep and contained a
    rubberised 13-gallon fuel tank. Two further 9-gallon tanks could be added each side within the door sills of a one-piece moulded glassfibre bodyshell, which sat over the backbone chassis rather like a saddle.

    At its front end the backbone carried a transverse box-section to provide front suspension pick-ups, while at the rear the backbone forked to pass supporting prongs along each side of an American Ford V8 engine. Numerous development problems were encountered with the first
    prototype car and its associated initial batch of Lotus 30 Series I
    production machines during 1964. The legendary Jim Clark shone in the Team Lotus car during the year’s Tourist Trophy race at Goodwood, leading Bruce McLaren’s latest for many laps.

    After the first three chassis had been built it was concluded that the backbone chassis was insufficiently stiff, and later numbers were
    panelled in thicker 18-gauge sheet. Rear end design was also revised, and larger 15-inch wheels were adopted in place of the original 13-inch to accommodate enlarged and more effective disc brakes. A total of 33 Lotus 30s would be built, of which 21 were the original-design Series 1s and only 12 were the uprated, much more refined – and infinitely more reliable – Series 2s such as this fine example now offered here. In period the Lotus 30s sold for £3,495. This was in fact inexpensive, for each car took some 600 man-hours to construct.
    It was in 1965 that this particular Lotus 30 Series 2 offered here first appeared. These Series 2 cars featured the simplified chassis rear end – in which the rear suspension cross-beam no longer had to be removed complete with suspensions in order to service the gearbox (!) – and a revised new body design also emerged with upswept tail spoiler and a vertical oil-cooler duct in the nose. Roll-over bars were fitted in
    compliance with contemporary Sports Car Club of America standards, and brand-new 101⁄4-inch diameter ventilated Girling disc brakes were fitted all round. While 15-inch wheels were adopted for the works – and some customer – cars, Dunlop’s latest low-profile R7 racing tyres ensured that the overall diameters were virtually unchanged.

    This particular car was track tested by the talented John Blunsden,
    associate editor of ‘Motor Racing’ magazine in the UK, and
    contributor to ‘Sports Car Graphic’ in the US. He described how the JCB Lotus 30 was one of the most heavily modified of its type. In particular the body had been split horizontally to enable the nose section to lift off completely, whereas standard Lotus 30s offered only restricted access via removable hatches. This had only been made possible by complete revision of the cooling system. Separate fuel fillers had also been provided in place of the standard single central filler neck. This car ran on 13-inch wheels when tested and was geared for 153mph at 6,800rpm. A ZF gearbox was fitted at that time and for acceptance by some of the Historic racing authorities today either a ZF of this type – Ford GT40-like 5DS25 unit – or perhaps a Hewland LG500 should be fitted, in place of the present after-period DG unit. John Blunsden concluded after his track test of the car at Brands Hatch in 1965 that this was “A Lotus 30 with a difference…and it’s the difference that matters”.

    It was certainly one of the most extensively developed of the cars in period, and in its JCB yellow livery it was certainly one of the highest profile, instantly recognisable wherever it ran.

    La Lotus 30 série 2 sous la livrée jaune vif de la JCB Excavator Company remplaçait une voiture antérieure détruite au cours d'un essai initial effectué par Peter Sadler. L'ancien pilote de F1 de Lotus, Trevor Taylor, reprit le châssis de rechange et en devint le pilote titulaire pour le reste de la saison 1965 en catégorie sport-compétition Groupe 7 britannique. Tandis que la Lotus 30 officielle de Jim Clark remportait la course « Senior Service 200 » interrompue par la pluie à Silverstone en mars, et celle de Goodwood le lundi de Pâques, Trevor Taylor terminait à une brillante deuxième place derrière une McLaren-Elva-Oldsmobile dans l'épreuve sport en lever de rideau du GP de Grande-Bretagne à Silverstone. Il s'agit donc d'une Lotus sport-compétition de haute volée, l'élément essentiel d 'une collection de Lotus. C'est aussi une voiture de compétition extrêmement puissante et efficace en course historique qui, dans des mains compétentes et dans les épreuves qui lui conviendront, saura tenir les premiers rôles.
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