Charles, Provincial and Civil War issues (1638-49), Oxford mint (1642-46), Triple unite, 26.6g, Oxford, 1643, artistic crowned half-length bust of king left, in armour without scarf holding sword and with longer branch, plume behind, reads CAROLVS.D:G.MAGN:BRIT:FRAN:ET:HIB:REX,

This lot has been removed from the website, please contact customer services for more information

Lot 1275
Charles,
Provincial and Civil War issues (1638-49), Oxford mint (1642-46), Triple unite, 26.6g, Oxford, 1643, artistic crowned half-length bust of king left, in armour without scarf holding sword and with longer branch, plume behind, reads CAROLVS.D:G.MAGN:BRIT:FRAN:ET:HIB:REX,

Sold for £ 16,450 (US$ 20,447) inc. premium
Charles,
Provincial and Civil War issues (1638-49), Oxford mint (1642-46), Triple unite, 26.6g, Oxford, 1643, artistic crowned half-length bust of king left, in armour without scarf holding sword and with longer branch, plume behind, reads CAROLVS.D:G.MAGN:BRIT:FRAN:ET:HIB:REX, R.declaration RELIG:PROT LEG:ANG LIBER:PAR, in three lines on continuous scroll, value and three plumes above, date below, m.m. Oxford, plume on obverse only, DEVS:DISSIPETVR:INIMICI:EXVRGAT: (N.2384; S.2727; B-J VI/L4), very fine possibly better with neat and strong portrait.

Footnotes

  • Upon October the 23rd, 1642, was fought the somewhat indecisive battle of Edgehill, or as it was first called, Kyneton Fight. Subsequently to which event, upon the following day, Charles drew off his forces in the direction of Oxford, which city he entered, together with his two sons, Charles and James, accompanied by Princes Rupert and Maurice, upon October the 29th.

    Already by October 26th, the wounded and stragglers from the battle of Edgehill had begun to enter Oxford, which from this time fourth, until its surrender by the King's command in 1646, became the capital-for such it may be justly termed-of royalist England.

    The choice of Oxford as the royalist capital was in some measure forced upon the King by the indecisive character of the battle of Edgehill, since the forces of the Earl of Essex still blocked the way to London, the stronghold of the Puritian party.

    The selection of Oxford, however, as a centre of military activity, was perhaps upon the whole fortunate, in that it stood in regard to the outlying loyal garrisons in the same relation as the hub of a wheel does to the rim. From this circumstance it was possible, by waging war from a central point, to rapidly concentrate forces for the relief of any threatened position upon the periphery.

    On the other hand, the distance at which Oxford lay from the seaboard of England rendered it very difficult to obtain arms and other munitions of war from the mainland of Europe, Bristol on the West Coast being the nearest port available for this purpose.

    Upon his entry into the city the King at once converted Christ Church College into his palace, whilst the twenty-seven cannon, brought off from the field of Edgehill, were parked in the grove of Magdalen College, and New College became a magazine of arms.
    The royalist troops were billeted upon the various Colleges and private citizens, the latter being disarmed, and their weapons given to the loyalist undergraduates; whilst at the same time a powder mill was opened at Oseney. The city was at once put into a state of defence, and as the fortifications at the beginning of the war were in a very defective condition, in order to raise the necessary defensive works, the citizens were compelled to labour with pick and spade, for stated periods, in default of which service they were obliged to pay or provide a substitute.

    Throughout this period of the Civil War, there were two Parliaments sitting in England, the one at Oxford, subservient to the King, the other at Westminster.
    The Parliament of Oxford consisted, like the other, of Two Houses, the Lords, who sat in the Convocation House, and the Commons, whose members sat in the Upper Schools. Thus at one and the same time there were two Parliaments in being, each of which considered and declared the acts of the other to be illegal.

    In July, 1643, Queen Henrietta Maria joined her husband at Oxford, bringing in her train a numerous army, and what was perchance of seven greater moment, an adequate supply of arms and warlike stores. The Queen remained in Oxford from July the 13th, 1643, until April 2nd, 1644, during which period she held her court at Merton College. Oxford remained the centre of royalist activity, until its surrender by the command of Charles upon June 24th, 1646, previously to which the King, having left Oxford upon April 27th, after a roundabout journey, arrived at Newark on May 5th, where he gave himself up to the Scottish army.

    The garrison of Oxford, at the date of its surrender, was under the command of Sir Thomas Glemham, perhaps better known as the defender of Carlisle, and numbered in all some five thousand regular troops. In addition there were "three auxiliary regiments consisting of gentleman and their servants, scholars, citizens and inhabitants, who were not properly of the garrison in pay". One of these auxiliary regiments, which was recruited in a large measure from the ranks of the legend fraternity and their servants, was known to fame as the "Caroline Devil's Own" and was first commanded by Lord Keeper Littleton. The garrison was allowed, by the terms granted upon the capitulation, to march out with all the honours of war, which it duly did upon June 24th, 1646, arriving at Thame midst such a dismal downpour of rain that the dripping standards clung dejectly to the poles, and there surrendered those arms, which had justly made it as much respected by foe as admired by friend.

    Oxford University was at the opening of the Civil War plenteously endowed with cash and rich stores of plate, and so early as July the 11th, 1642, we find the King writing from York to Dr. Pridaux, Bishop of Worcester, the then Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University, requesting the loan of money, for which he expressed himself as prepared to pay interest at the rate of 8 per cent. Upon this understanding Convocation met and, promptly falling in with the King's wishes, forwarded to him such moneys as were at that time in the Savile and Bodley chests as also that in the University chest, which amounted in all to the sum of £860.
Charles, Provincial and Civil War issues (1638-49), Oxford mint (1642-46), Triple unite, 26.6g, Oxford, 1643, artistic crowned half-length bust of king left, in armour without scarf holding sword and with longer branch, plume behind, reads CAROLVS.D:G.MAGN:BRIT:FRAN:ET:HIB:REX,
Charles, Provincial and Civil War issues (1638-49), Oxford mint (1642-46), Triple unite, 26.6g, Oxford, 1643, artistic crowned half-length bust of king left, in armour without scarf holding sword and with longer branch, plume behind, reads CAROLVS.D:G.MAGN:BRIT:FRAN:ET:HIB:REX,
Auction information

This sale is now finished. If you are interested in consigning in future sales, please contact the specialist department. If you have queries about lots purchased in this sale, please contact customer services.

Buyers' Obligations

ALL BIDDERS MUST AGREE THAT THEY HAVE READ AND UNDERSTOOD BONHAMS' CONDITIONS OF SALE AND AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THEM, AND AGREE TO PAY THE BUYER'S PREMIUM AND ANY OTHER CHARGES MENTIONED IN THE NOTICE TO BIDDERS. THIS AFFECTS THE BIDDERS LEGAL RIGHTS.

If you have any complaints or questions about the Conditions of Sale, please contact your nearest customer services team.

Buyers' Premium and Charges

For all Sales categories, buyer's premium excluding Cars, Motorbikes, Wine and Coin & Medal sales, will be as follows:

Buyer's Premium Rates
27.5% on the first £2,500 of the hammer price;
25% of the hammer price of amounts in excess of £2,500 up to and including £300,000;
20% of the hammer price of amounts in excess of £300,000 up to and including £3,000,000;
and 13.9% of the hammer price of any amounts in excess of £3,000,000.

VAT at the current rate of 20% will be added to the Buyer's Premium and charges excluding Artists Resale Right.

Payment Notices

For payment information please refer to the sale catalog.

Shipping Notices

For information and estimates on domestic and international shipping as well as export licenses please contact Bonhams Shipping Department.