Skip to main content

Les Grandes Marques du Monde à Paris / 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928

1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 1
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 2
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 3
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 4
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 5
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 6
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 7
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 8
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 9
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 10
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 11
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 12
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 13
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 14
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 15
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 16
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 17
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 18
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 19
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 20
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 21
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 1
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 2
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 3
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 4
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 5
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 6
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 7
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 8
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 9
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 10
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 11
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 12
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 13
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 14
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 15
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 16
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 17
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 18
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 19
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 20
Thumbnail of 1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta  Chassis no. 2-033683 Engine no. 1-0194928 image 21
Lot 615
1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta
Amended
2 February 2023, 13:00 CET
Paris, The Grand Palais Éphémère

Lot to be sold without reserve

€1,800,000 - €2,600,000

How to bid

Ask about this lot

1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta
Chassis no. 2-033683
Engine no. 1-0194928

• The only V2 built
• One of the most aerodynamic road cars ever made
• Based on a Volkswagen Beetle platform
• Recently restored

Footnotes

The most famous performance car based on the Volkswagen Beetle is, of course, the Porsche 356, but before then there was another from an unlikely source: the Luftwaffe. Specifically, the Luftwaffe's 'courier car' was based on the very first Volkswagen: the KdF Wagen Typ 60, which was in production from 1937 to 1944. The Luftwaffe's requirement was for a fast small car that would serve as a courier vehicle, while at the same time being light, reliable, cheap to build and simple to maintain. The car took its name from its German designer, Kurt C Volkhart, while the low-drag body was designed by Baron R König von Fachsenfeld, who would later produce many streamlined designs for mainstream German manufacturers.

Kurt Volkhart, born in 1890, constructed the first rocket car for Opel in 1928 based on an idea by Max Valier. He also drove it until Fritz von Opel recognised the publicity value of driving the car himself. Volkhart left Opel in resentment; he competed in car races, built his own rocket car, and briefly worked on the construction of a rocket-powered aircraft.
Volkhart had long ago recognised that performance could be improved by careful aerodynamic design, and towards the end of the 1930s planned a small, inexpensive sports car: the two-seater V1. The rear-mounted 1,172cc engine was the same as that found in the Ford Eifel and produced only 32bhp, which in the donor car was good enough for a top speed no better than 100km/h (62mph). But thanks to its extraordinarily low claimed drag coefficient of only 0.165, the slippery Volkhart was capable of speeds of up to 138km/h (85.7mph). Modern aerodynamicists later recalculated the V1's likely drag coefficient as 0.30, but when the V2 was tested in Volkswagen's wind tunnel in 2013 it was found to be 0.216, as good as the very best of modern designs.

Development continued but was stopped later in the war, and the project would not resurface until 1947, following an injection of funds from Sagitta. Based on a Volkswagen chassis that Volkhart had purchased during the war (which was confiscated by the British Army before being retrieved by its owner), the new V2 offered accommodation for 4/5 passengers but never came close to series production, not the least because Volkswagen refused to provide chassis. Construction of the aluminium body was entrusted to Helmut Fuchs in Niederwenningern, Ruhr, with additional work by Hans Daum's body shop. One of the V2's many interesting features was a novel 'anti-skid' mechanism mounted at the rear behind the engine as an early form of 'stability control'.
Only one example of the V2 Sagitta was built in 1947; it was purchased by Hugo Tigges, who had sourced the raw materials necessary for its construction. Tigges used the V2 as his 'daily driver' for six years before consigning it in 1953 to his garden where it served as a chicken coop!

In 1955, the V2 was so neglected that Helmut Daum, son of the aforementioned Hans Daum, was allowed to relocate the chickens and recover the car from the garden. Over the succeeding decades, it was rebuilt and repainted several times and then laid up before coming to Austria in 2011, finding a new home with an Austrian Porsche collector. "I always wanted a one-off," said the new owner in 2015. "I immediately drove to classic car events, including Villa d'Este." There, in 2012, the Volkhart V2 was declared a personal favourite by the television team's presenter, who interviewed only the owner to the chagrin of the many Ferrari owners!
When he later refused to sell the V2 to a friend, the latter offered to restore it for him. The aluminium body has been restored and the non-original British Racing Green livery replaced by silver metallic (the original finish), with the result that its sculptural lines are revealed to their full effect. We are advised that the Beetle engine's 24 horses are in good shape and sound even stronger in the lightweight V2.

Purple Paddle Lot: Please note there is restricted bidding on this lot which requires enhanced bid verification checks. Please contact us at [email protected] or call +44 20 7447 7447 as soon as possible if you are planning to bid on this lot to prevent any last-minute delays.



1947 Volkhart V2 Sagitta
Châssis n° 2-033683
Moteur n° 1-0194928


• La seule V2 construite
• Une des voitures les plus aérodynamiques jamais construites
• Plate-forme Volkswagen « Coccinelle »
• Récemment restaurée

La plus connue des voitures sportives sur base Volkswagen est, bien sûr, la Porsche 356, mais avant elle il y en eut une autre, d'une source plutôt inattendue, la Luftwaffe. Plus spécifiquement, l'« estafette » de la Luftwaffe était basée sur la toute première Volkswagen, la KdF Wagen Typ 60, produite de 1937 à 1944. Les réquêtes de la Luftwaffe spécifiaient une petite voiture rapide qui servirait d'engin de liaison, en même temps légère, fiable, peu coûteuse à construire et simple à entretenir. La voiture devait son nom à son concepteur allemand, Kurt C. Volkhart, tandis que sa carrosserie aérodynamique était dessinée par le baron R. König von Fachsenfeld, qui allait par la suite concevoir de nombreux modèles aérodynamiques pour les constructeurs allemands.

Kurt Volkhart, né en 1890, avait construit la première voiture fusée pour Opel en 1928 basé sur une idée de Max Valier. Il la conduisit jusqu'à ce que Fritz von Opel prenne conscience de l'impact publicitaire s'il la pilotait lui-même. Volkhart quitta Opel avec rancœur, puis pilota en compétition, construisit sa propre voiture-fusée et travailla brièvement à la construction d'un avion propulsé par fusée.
Volkhart avait compris depuis longtemps que les performances pouvaient être améliorées, grâce à un traitement aérodynamique soigné et vers la fin des année 1930 imagina une petite sportive économique, la deux places V1. Le moteur de 1 172 cm3 à l'arrière était le même que celui de la Ford Eifel et développait seulement 32 ch qui, dans la voiture donneuse, permettait une vitesse supérieure à 100 km/h. Mais grâce à son coefficient de trainée particulièrement bas de seulement 0,165, l'insaisissable Volkhart dépassait les 138 km/h. Plus tard, des aérodynamiciens modernes recalculèrent le coefficient de trainée de la V1 plutôt autour de 0,30, mais quand la V2 fut testée dans la soufflerie Volkswagen en 2013 il s'avéra être de 0,216, aussi bon que les meilleurs prototypes contemporains.

La mise au point continua, mais fut arrêtée plus tard dans l'année et le projet ne refit pas surface jusqu'en 1947, après un apport de fonds de Sagitta. Basée sur la plate-forme Volkswagen que Volkhart avait achetée pendant la guerre (qui avait été confisquée par l'armée britannique avant d'être récupérée par son propriétaire), la nouvelle V2 offrait la place à 4/5 passagers mais ne parvint jamais à la construction en série, en partie parce que Volkswagen avait refusé de fournir des châssis. La construction de la carrosserie en aluminium fut confiée à Helmut Fuchs de Niederwenningern, dans la Ruhr, des travaux additionnels étant effectués à l'atelier de Hans Daum. L'une des nombreuses caractéristiques intéressantes de la V2 était son novateur système anti-dérapant monté derrière le moteur, une sorte de « contrôle de stabilité » avant l'heure.

Un seul exemplaire de la V2 Sagitta fut construit en 1947. Il fut acheté par Hugo Tigges qui avait fourni la matière première nécessaire à sa construction. Tigges utilisa la V2 comme moyen de transport quotidien pendant six années avant de la réformer en 1953 pour servir de poulailler dans son jardin !

En 1955, la V2 était si négligée que Helmut Daum, le fils de Hans Daum mentionné plus haut, fut autorisé à reloger les poules et récupérer la voiture du jardin. Pendant les décennies qui suivirent, elle fut reconstruite et repeinte plusieurs fois et abandonnée avant d'arriver en Autriche en 2011, trouvant refuge chez un collectionneur de Porsche Autrichien. « J'ai toujours désiré un modèle unique » déclara le nouveau propriétaire en 2015. « Je me suis immédiatement rendu à des manifestations de voitures anciennes, y compris la Villa d'Este. »
Là en 2012, la Volkhart V2 fut déclarée par le commentateur de la télévision qui interviewait le propriétaire, être sa favorite, au grand dam des propriétaires de Ferrari !
Quand le dernier propriétaire refusa de vendre la V2 à un ami, ce dernier lui proposa de la restaurer pour lui. La carrosserie en aluminium a été restaurée et la livrée British Racing Green qui n'était d'origine a été remplacée par une peinture argent métallisé (sa couleur originelle), avec comme résultat de mettre en valeur ses lignes sculpturales. On nous signale que le moteur de Coccinelle de 24 ch est en bon état et tourne encore mieux sur la légère V2.

Lot Purple Paddle : Veuillez noter que ce lot est soumis à certaines restrictions et requiert certaines vérifications avant de pouvoir enchérir. 
Merci de nous contacter à [email protected] ou d'appeler au +44 20 7447 7447 le plus tôt possible si vous envisagez d'enchérir sur ce lot afin d'éviter tous délais de dernière minute.

Saleroom notices

As stated in the printed and online catalogue this lot is offered without reserve. - Comme indiqué au catalogue imprimé et au catalogue online, ce lot est offert sans réserve. The estimate price is as indicated on online catalogue: 1,800,000 - 2,200,000€ - Le prix d'estimation est tel qu'indiqué au catalogue online: 1,800,000 - 2,200,000€.

Additional information