Skip to main content

Les Grandes Marques du Monde à Paris / 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S

1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 1
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 2
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 3
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 4
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 5
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 6
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 7
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 8
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 9
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 10
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 11
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 12
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 13
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 14
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 15
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 16
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 17
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 18
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 19
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 20
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 21
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 22
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 23
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 24
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 25
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 26
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 27
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 28
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 29
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 30
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 31
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 32
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 33
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 34
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 35
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 36
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 37
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 38
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 39
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 40
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 1
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 2
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 3
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 4
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 5
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 6
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 7
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 8
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 9
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 10
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 11
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 12
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 13
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 14
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 15
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 16
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 17
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 18
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 19
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 20
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 21
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 22
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 23
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 24
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 25
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 26
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 27
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 28
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 29
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 30
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 31
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 32
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 33
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 34
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 35
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 36
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 37
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 38
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 39
Thumbnail of 1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports  Chassis no. F4/447/S Engine no. F4/447/S image 40
Lot 553
*
1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports
2 February 2023, 13:00 CET
Paris, The Grand Palais Éphémère

€1,400,000 - €1,800,000

Ask about this lot

1934 Aston Martin Ulster Two-seater Sports
Coachwork by Enrico Bertelli

Chassis no. F4/447/S
Engine no. F4/447/S

• Finisher in the 1935 Le Mans 24 Hours (15th overall)
• Matching chassis and engine
• Known ownership history from new
• Present ownership since 2005
• Restored by Ecurie Bertelli in 2007/2008
• Chassis-numbered Owners' Edition of Aston Martin Ulster included

Footnotes

"Based on the MkII chassis, the Ulster was the apotheosis of the pre-war sporting Aston Martin. A replica of the 1934 team cars which had finished 3rd, 6th and 7th in the Ulster TT race, it was made available to amateur racers for just £750." – Michael Bowler, Aston Martin – The Legend.

Manufactured by Robert Bamford and Lionel Martin, the first Aston-Martins (the hyphen is correct for the period) rapidly established a reputation for high performance and sporting prowess in the years immediately following The Great War. Unfortunately, the management's concentration on motor sport, while accruing invaluable publicity, distracted it from the business of manufacturing cars for sale, the result being only 50-or-so sold by 1925 when the company underwent the first of what would be many changes of ownership.

The foundations were laid for the commencement of proper series production with the formation of Aston Martin Motors Ltd in 1926 under the stewardship of Augustus 'Bert' Bertelli and William Renwick. Bertelli was an experienced automobile engineer, having designed cars for Enfield & Allday, and an engine of his design - an overhead-camshaft four-cylinder of 1,492cc - powered the new 11.9hp Aston. Built at the firm's new Feltham works, the first 'new generation' Aston Martins were displayed at the 1927 London Motor Show at Olympia.
Like his predecessors, 'Bert' Bertelli understood the effect of competition success on Aston Martin sales and sanctioned the construction of two works racers for the 1928 season. Based on the 1½-litre road car, the duo featured dry-sump lubrication – a feature that would stand them in good stead in long distance sports car events – and this was carried over to the International sports model, newly introduced for 1929. Built in two wheelbase lengths (8' 6" and 9' 10") the International was manufactured between 1929 and 1932, mostly with bodies by Augustus's brother Enrico 'Harry' Bertelli.

The 'Le Mans' label was first applied to the competition version of the (1st Series) International following Aston's class win and 5th place overall in the 1931 Le Mans race. This conceit was fully justified when the model placed 5th and 7th in the 1932 race and collected the Rudge-Whitworth Biennial Cup. It may, in fact, be the first car named after the Le Mans Race, although many others have since followed Aston Martin's example.
The early 1930s was a period of economic recession and with sales of expensive quality cars falling off, some serious rethinking had to be done at Feltham. The prudent decision was taken to redesign the International chassis using proprietary components to reduce cost. A Laycock gearbox was adopted, mounted in unit with the engine, while the worm rear axle, which had never been completely satisfactory, was replaced by an ENV spiral bevel. There was a redesigned chassis frame and many other modifications resulting in what was virtually a new car, although it carried the same coachwork and was sold as the 'New International'. The original line-up of what would become known as the '2nd Series' did not last long, the New International and two-seater Le Mans disappearing from the range before the end of 1932. That year's Motor Show had ushered in the more familiar Le Mans 2/4-seater, which was also available on the long chassis as the Le Mans Special four-seater.

Introduced in 1934, the replacement Mark II model sported a new, stronger chassis and a revised engine with counter-balanced crankshaft. Short (8' 7") and long (10') wheelbase versions were built, the latter available with stylish four-seater sports saloon coachwork by Enrico Bertelli.
Racing was still at the forefront of company policy under the stewardship of new owners the Sutherlands, Robert Gordon Sutherland having assuming the post of joint managing director alongside 'Bert' Bertelli in March 1933. For the 1934 Le Mans race, three competition cars were constructed on the new MkII chassis, the frames being copiously drilled for lightness. In the race all three works Astons were sidelined by trifling mechanical problems, prompting Bertelli to try and un-jinx the team by painting the cars – previously always finished in various shades of green – in Italian Racing Red. The next race on Aston Martin's calendar was the RAC Tourist Trophy at Ards in Ulster, regulations for which stipulated standard chassis. Three new cars were built on unmodified frames and the superstitious Bertelli was duly rewarded with a 100% finishing rate. The trio finished 1st, 2nd and 3rd in class, earning Aston Martin the Team Prize. In 1935 another works car, chassis number 'LM20', finished 3rd overall at Le Mans, winning its class and the Rudge Cup.

In October of 1934, Aston Martin exhibited the resulting spin-off model at the Olympia Motor Show, introducing it as 'a Replica of the three cars which ran so successfully in the 1934 TT race.' Built on the shorter of the two MkII chassis, the Ulster differed little from its more run-of-the-mill siblings, though the engine was subjected to tuning and more careful assembly. Modifications included polishing the inlet and exhaust ports, and raising the compression ratio to 9.5:1 by means of domed pistons and a 'stepped' cylinder head, the result of these changes being an increase in maximum power to around 85bhp. The Laystall crankshaft and the valves and valve springs were of higher specification than those of the other MkII models. Lightweight, door-less two-seater bodywork was fitted and every Ulster was guaranteed to exceed 100mph with full road equipment, a phenomenal achievement for a 1½-litre production car at that time.
A serious competition machine, the Ulster abounded in mechanical refinements resulting from the factory's years of endurance racing experience. These included painting the dashboard matte black and the radiator surround in body colour – reflected early-morning sunlight had been found to be a serious problem when flat out at Le Mans – and securing every chassis nut with a split pin.
In his book Aston Martin 1913-1947, Inman Hunter comments: "If ever a car looked right for its purpose it was the Ulster, but like all Bertelli Aston-Martins, with a dry weight of 18cwt, it was absurdly heavy in comparison with Rileys, Magnettes and Nashes, so lacked their acceleration. Yet its unique qualities of stamina and superb handling earned the respect of enthusiasts all over the world."

Of the 31 Ulsters built, including 10 team cars, 28 survive and the whereabouts of all are well known. No doubt the car's legendary robustness played a part in this quite exceptional survival rate. Chassis number 'F4/447/S' was built on 1st June 1934 and registered as 'WD 8011' by Warwickshire County Council on 3rd September that year. The first owner was Mr Richard Gardner of Rugby and the car was originally painted red. It is notable as one of only two Ulsters with chromed radiators, the other being the blue Prince Bira car.
On 15/16th June 1935 Gardner and his co-driver A L Beloe shared 'F4/447/S' at Le Mans, finishing 15th overall and 7th in the Rudge Cup (out of 60 starters). Messrs Gardner and Beloe averaged almost 67mph for the 24 hours, a highly creditable achievement considering that both drivers were relatively inexperienced. Gardner (and the car) had even survived a minor 'shunt', having gone off in the rain and thumped a bank, necessitating a lengthy pit stop on the Sunday morning.

On 6th March 1936 the Ulster was advertised for sale in Autocar by Winter Garden Garages, in 'excellent condition' with an asking price of £450. In 1938 the Aston was owned by Leslie Calverley Trevelyan of Onslow Gardens, London. In March 1939 the car was again advertised for sale in Autocar, on this occasion by Speed Models Ltd, who described it as 'red and chromium' and 'very fast'. The asking price had dropped somewhat, to £175.

Possibly because the licence had expired, or the logbook lost, the Ulster was reregistered on 30th March 1939 as 'FLR 707', with Speed Models Ltd erroneously recorded as the first owner. Speed Models' plaque remains on the dashboard to this day. In April 1939 the car was sold to Lord Bruce Dundas and in December '39 was 'laid up' when Lord Dundas went to war, serving with the RAF in Bomber Command. Regrettably, he would never return: posted as missing along with his crew while on a mine laying operation in February 1942.

In April 1950 Lord Dundas's mother decided to sell the car, which was advertised for £415 but remained unsold. In August 1953 Chiltern Cars advertised the Ulster in Motor Sport for £495. On 8th September 1953 the car was bought by Basil Scully and shipped to West Groten, Massachusetts showing 29,582 miles on the odometer. The car was then registered in Massachusetts as 'H20065'.
By 1956 Scully had repainted the Aston in green, and the car was mechanically renovated and maintained in its owner's business, Scully's Auto Shop. In July 1959 the Ulster was featured in Sports Car Illustrated. Scully would enter the Ulster in the following VSCCA events over the years:

June 1959 Larz Anderson Museum Hill Climb
September 1959 Thompson Raceway Time Trials
June 1960 Larz Anderson Museum Hill Climb
June 1961 Larz Anderson Museum Hill Climb
August 1963 Thompson Raceway Time Trials
October 1963 Larz Anderson Museum Hill Climb
October 1964 Thompson Raceway Time Trials
April 1972 Larz Anderson Museum Hill Climb
May 1972 Wellesley (Hunnewell) Massachusetts Hill Climb

In September 1986, due to ill health, Basil Scully sold the Aston Martin after 33 years of ownership to Dr Hugh Palmer of Oakham, Rutland, UK. Basil Scully died in 1988. That same year the engine rebuilt for Dr Palmer by David Taylor of Chesham. On 3rd October 1989 Simon Draper bought the car from Dr Palmer, and in 1995 it was featured in Classic & Sports Car (May edition). Alan Archer has this to say about Simon Draper's ownership: "Raced modestly by him and his friends, but conservation of an Ulster that has not been rebuilt was the essence of Draper's ownership. Its original condition was preserved so far as was possible without jeopardising its ability to be a thoroughly dependable roadworthy car." While with Simon Draper, 'F4/447/S' entered the following events:

1991 Silverstone St John Horsfall Trophy (Draper) winner
1996 Silverstone St John Horsfall Trophy (Archer) 9th
1999 Silverstone 50th St John Horsfall Trophy (S Archer) event abandoned due to flooded track
2000 Silverstone 50th St John Horsfall Trophy (S Archer) 17th overall, 2nd on handicap, winner Bob Fowler Trophy

On 9th December 2005 the Ulster was purchased by the current vendor, Mr Alan K Beardshaw. Between October 2007 and May 2008, celebrated marque specialists Ecurie Bertelli rebuilt 'F4/447/S' to ensure safety while retaining its integrity and reusing all original parts. The colour was returned to the original works racing 'Red' as found on the offside of the body during the rebuild. The body still retains the dents visible in pictures from Le Mans in 1935, and the dashboard is 'as was'. 'F4/447/S' is about as original as any Ulster: even the front wing extensions can be seen in the Le Mans photographs, believed fitted because the wings did not extend far enough over the wheels to comply with the regulations. Following the restoration's completion the Ulster competed in the 2009 Mille Miglia Storica driven by Alan's sons Chris and Benn Beardshaw, and the car also took part in the Donington Park 75th Anniversary meeting in June 2011.
Like all fellows, 'F4/447/S' is featured in Alan Archer's definitive book on the marque, Aston Martin Ulster, published by Palawan Press. Included in the sale is its individually chassis-numbered Owners' Edition of Aston Martin Ulster, leather bound and featuring an aluminium plate on the cover etched with the car's photograph. Only 31 copies of the Owners' Edition were printed. The history file also contains copies of the original chassis cards; Chiltern Cars' bill of sale to Basil Scully; a selection of photographs, some taken at Le Mans in 1935; and marque specialist Stephen Archer's recent inspection report. The car also comes with what are believed to be the original seats.
Representing a once-in-lifetime opportunity to acquire a fully documented example of Aston Martin's finest sports car of the pre-war era, 'L4/447/S' is eligible for all the most important historic motor sports events including Le Mans and the Mille Miglia.

Purple Paddle Lot: Please note there is restricted bidding on this lot which requires enhanced bid verification checks. Please contact us at [email protected] or call +44 20 7447 7447 as soon as possible if you are planning to bid on this lot to prevent any last-minute delays.

Please note that if this vehicle is sold to a French private buyer or an EU private individual the reduced rate of Import VAT at 5.5% will be charged on the hammer price. The Import VAT will be invoiced to you by our custom broker who will also charge a clearance fee. If you buy as a Trader or Company however, the Finances Publiques will charge you directly (based on our customs broker clearance) and the French VAT Import Charges will not appear on your Bonhams invoice. Please note that if you purchase as an EU Company, you are required to pay the VAT in your registered country at the relevant rate. Import rates to other EU Countries may vary and an administration fee will be charged to prepare the necessary customs clearance. If you have any questions regarding customs clearance, please contact the Bonhams Motorcar Department or our recommended shippers.

1934 Aston Martin Ulster sport deux places
Carrosserie Enrico Bertelli
Châssis n° F4/447/S
Moteur n° F4/447/S

• Concurrente des 24 Heures du Mans 1935 (15e au classement général)
• Numéros de châssis et de moteur concordants
• Historique des propriétaires connu depuis son origine
• Aux mains de l'actuel propriétaire depuis 2005
• Restaured par l'Écurie Bertelli en 2007/2008
• Édition spéciale de l'ouvrage Aston Martin Ulster tamponnée au numéro du châssis incluse dans la vente

« Reposant sur le châssis MkII, l'Ulster était la quintessence des Aston Martin sportives d'avant-guerre. Réplique des voitures d'usine qui avait fini 3e, 6e et 7e à l'Ulster Tourist Trophy de 1934, elle était proposée aux pilotes amateurs pour seulement 750 £. » - Michael Bolster, in « Aston Martin – The legend ».

Construites par Robert Bamford et Lionel Martin, les premières Aston-Martin (le tiret est de rigueur à l'époque) se firent rapidement une réputation de hautes performances et d'aptitudes sportives dans la période qui suit immédiatement la première guerre mondiale. Malheureusement, l'intérêt exclusif de la direction pour la compétition, bien qu'elle ait été une publicité indéniable, l'empêcha de se consacrer à la construction de modèles destinés à la vente et le résultat fut que seulement une cinquantaine avaient été vendues en 1925 quand la société connut le premier - parmi de nombreux autres - changement de propriétaire.
Les fondations pour une véritable construction en série furent posées lorsque Aston Martin Motors Ltd fut créé en 1926, sous la houlette d'Augustus « Bert » Bertelli et William Renwick. Bertelli était un ingénieur automobile expérimenté, ayant conçu des voitures pour Enfield & Allday, et un moteur de son cru – un quatre cylindres à arbre à cames en tête de 1 492 cm3 – qui propulsait l'Aston 11,9 HP. Construites dans la nouvelle usine de la société à Feltham, la première « nouvelle génération » d'Aston Martin fut exposée au Salon de Londres à l'Olympia en 1927.
Comme ses prédécesseur, « Bert » Bertelli connaissait les effets de la compétition sur les ventes d'Aston Martin et lança la construction de deux modèles d'usine pour la saison 1928. Prenant pour base le modèle routier à moteur 1,5 litre à arbre à cames en tête, la paire recevait une lubrification par carter sec, une caractéristique qui fut également adoptée sur les modèles sport International, présentés en 1929. Construits sur deux longueurs d'empattement (102 et 118 pouces – 2,60 m et 3 m), l'International fut construite entre 1929 et 1932, généralement avec une carrosserie due au frère d'Augustus, Enrico « Harry » Bertelli.

Le nom de Le Mans fut apposé pour la première fois sur la version compétition de l'International (1e série) à la suite de la 5e place au classement général et de la victoire de classe d'Aston Martin au Mans en 1931. Cette appellation fut entièrement justifiée quand le modèle termina aux 5e et 7e places dans l'épreuve de 1932 et remporta la coupe bisannuelle Rudge-Witworth. Il se pourrait bien qu'elle ait été la première voiture à prendre le nom de la course mancelle, même si, depuis, de nombreuses autres l'ont imitée.

Le début des années 1930 fut une période de récession économique qui entraina la chute des ventes des onéreuses voitures de qualité, et on dut se mettre à réfléchir à Feltham. On prit la judicieuse décision de revoir le châssis de l'International en utilisant des composants maison afin de réduire les coûts. Une boîte Laycock fut montée solidairement au moteur et la vis sans fin qui n'avait jamais vraiment donné satisfaction fut remplacée par un engrenage conique ENV. Le cadre du châssis fut redessiné et de nombreuses autres modifications menèrent à un modèle entièrement nouveau, bien qu'il conservât la même carrosserie et soit baptisé « New International ». La gamme originale de ce qui allait être connu sous le nom de « 2e série » ne dura pas longtemps, la New International et la version deux places de la Le Mans disparaissant avant la fin de 1932. Le Salon de cette année-là vit l'apparition de la plus familière Le Mans 2/4 places qui était également proposée sur empattement long sous le nom de Le Mans Special 4 places.

Présentée en 1934, le modèle Mark II qui la remplaçait avait un nouveau châssis plus robuste et un moteur modifié avec un arbre à cames équilibré. Des châssis court (2,59 m) et long (3,05 m) furent construits, le dernier doté d'élégantes carrosseries berlines quatre places d'Enrico Bertelli.
La course était toujours le nerf de la guerre de la marque sous la houlette des nouveaux propriétaires Sutherlands, Robert Gordon Sutherland ayant pris le poste de directeur général aux côtés de « Bert » Bertelli en mars 1933. En 1934, pour Le Mans, trois voitures furent construites sur le nouveau châssis MkII, ceux-ci étant généreusement perforés pour les alléger. Pendant la course, les trois Aston d'usine furent handicapées par de petits problèmes mécaniques, amenant Bertelli à repeindre les voitures – généralement peintes dans divers tons de vert – en rouge italien pour exorciser l'équipe. La course suivante au calendrier d'Aston Martin était le Tourist Trophy du RAC à Ards en Ulster, dont le règlement stipulait des châsis de série. Trois nouvelles voitures furent construites sur des châssis non modifiés et le superstitieux Bertelli fut dûment récompensé avec 100% des voitures à l'arrivée. Le trio finissait 1er, 2e et 3e de sa classe, qui valut à Aston Martin le prix par équipe. En 1935, une autre voiture d'usine, châssis numéro LM20, finissait 3e au classement général au Mans, remportant sa classe et la coupe Rudge.

En octobre 1934, Aston Martin exposa le modèle qui en dérivait à l'Olympia Motor Show, le dévoilant comme « une réplique des trois voitures qui avaient couru avec succès au Tourist Trophy en 1934 ». Construies sur le châssis court des deux MkII, l'Ulster différait peu de ses sœurs de série, bien que son moteur ait été légèrement préparé et assemblé plus soigneusement. Les modifications comprenaient le polissage des conduits d'admission et d'échappement et l'élévation du taux de compression à 9.5:1. Grâce à des pistons bombés et une culasse étagée, ces changements donnaient une puissance maximale d'environ 85 ch. Le vilebrequin Laystall, ainsi que les soupapes et leurs ressorts étaient de caractéristiques supérieures à celles des MkII. Des carrosseries allégées deux places sans portes étaient montées et chaque Ulster était garantie dépasser les 100 mph (160 km/h) gréées pour la route, une phénoménale réussite pour une voiture de série de 1½ litre à l'époque.
Sérieuse machine de compétition, l'Ulster était truffée de raffinements mécaniques résultants d'années d'expérience de l'usine en endurance. Cela incluait notamment la peinture noir mat du tableau de bord et l'entourage du radiateur de la couleur de la carrosserie – les reflets du soleil levant s'étant avérés être un sérieux problème à pleine vitesse au Mans – ainsi que le blocage de chaque écrou de châssis par une clavette.
Dans son livre Aston Martin 1913-1947, Inman Hunter explique : « S'il y eut jamais une voiture qui montrait ce pour quoi elle avait été conçue, c'était bien l'Ulster, mais comme toutes les Aston-Martin de Bertelli, avec un poids à sec de 18cwt (914 kg), elle était rridiculement lourde, comparée aux Riley, Magnette et Nash, aussi manquaient-elles de nervosité. Mais leurs étonnantes qualités d'endurance et leur excellente tenue de route leur valurent le respect des pasionnés dans le monde entier ».

Des 31 Ulster construites, incluant 10 voitures d'usine, 28 ont survécu et leur histoires sont toutes parfaitement connues. Il ne fait aucun doute que la légendaire robustesse des voitures a joué un rôle majeure dans cet étonnant taux de survie. Le châssis numéro F4/447/S a été construit le 1er juin 1934 et immatriculé WD 8011 au Warwickshire County Council le 3 septembre de la même année. Son premier propriétaire était M. Richard Gardner de Rugby et la voiture était à l'origine rouge. C'est l'une des deux seules Ulster à radiateur chromé, l'autre étant la voiture bleue du Prince Bira.
Les 15 et 16 juin 1935, Gardner et son co-pilote A. L. Beloe partageaient F4/447/S au Mans, terminant 15e au classement général et 7e à la coupe Rudge (sur 60 concurrents). Messieurs Gardner et Beloe firent une moyenne de presque 67 mph (108 km/h) au cours des 24 heures, un résultat très honorable, si l'on considère que les deux pilotes n'avaient pratiquement aucune expérience. Gardner (et la voiture) avaient même survécu à un petit accrochage, ayant dérapé sous la pluie et heurté un talus, ce qui avait nécessité un long arrêt au stand le dimanche matin.

Le 6 mars 1936, l'Ulster était mise en vente dans Autocar par Winter Garden Garages, en « excellent état » pour le prix de 450 £. En 1938, l'Aston appartenait à Leslie Calverley Trevelyan d'Onslow Gardens, à Londres. En mars 1939, la voiture était à nouveau mise en vente dans Autocar, cette fois par Speed Models Ltd, qui la décrivait comme « rouge et chrome » et « très rapide ». Le prix demandé était descendu à 175 £.
Peut-être parce que sa licence avait expiré ou qu'on avait égaré son carnet de bord, l'Ulster fut ré-immatriculée le 30 mars 1939 FLR 707, Speed Models Ltd étant désigné par erreur comme premier propriéatire. La plaque de Speed Model est restée au tableau de bord jusqu'à aujourd'hui. En avril 1939, la voiture fut vendue à Lord Bruce Dundas et en décembre 1939 fut remisée lorsque Lord Dundas se rendit à la guerre, servant à la RAF au Bomber Command. Malheureusement, il ne revint jamais, porté disparu avec son équipage, alors qu'il participait à une mission comme poseur de mines en février 1942.
En avril 1950, la mère de Lord Dundas décida de vendre la voiture qui fut affichée pour 415 £, mais resta invendue. En août 1953, Chiltern Cars mit une annonce pour l'Ulster dans Motor Sport pour 495 £. Le 8 septembre 1953, la voiture fut achetée par Basil Scully et expédiée à West Groten, dans le Massachusetts avec 29 582 miles au compteur. La voiture fut alors immatriculée H20065 au Massachusetts.

Vers 1956 Scully fit repeindre l'Aston en vert et elle fut mécaniquement rénovée et entretenue par la société de son propriétaire, Scully's Auto Shop. En juillet 1959, l'Ulster figurait dans Sports Car Illustrated. Scully engagea l'Ulster dans les épreuves du VSCCA au cours des années suivantes :

Juin 1959 Larz Anderson Museum Hill Climb
Septembre 1959 Thompson Raceway Time Trials
Juin 1960 Larz Anderson Museum Hill Climb
Juin 1961 Larz Anderson Museum Hill Climb
Août 1963 Thompson Raceway Time Trials
Octobre 1963 Larz Anderson Museum Hill Climb
Octobre 1964 Thompson Raceway Time Trials
Avril 1972 Larz Anderson Museum Hill Climb
Mai 1972 Wellesley (Hunnewell) Massachusetts Hill Climb

En septembre 1986, pour des raisons de santé, Basil Scully vendit l'Aston Martin après 33 années en sa possession au Dr Hugh Palmer d'Oakham, Rutland, au Royaume-Uni. Basil Scully mourut en 1988. Cette année, le moteur fut refait pour le Dr Palmer par David Taylor de Chesham. Le 3 octobre 1989, Simon Draper acheta la voiture au Dr Palmer et, en 1995, elle figurait dans Classic & Sports Car (numéro de mai). Alan Archer déclarait à propos de la possession de Simon Draper : « Piloté par lui et ses amis avec parcimonie, la conservation d'une Ulster qui n'a pas été refaite était l'essence même de la façon de posséder de Draper. Son état d'origine fut préservé autant que faire se peut, sans compromettre ses aptitudes à rester une voiture complètement utilisable sur route ». Avec Simon Draper, F4/447/S fut engagée dans les épreuves suivantes :

1991 Silverstone St John Horsfall Trophy (Draper) vainqueur
1996 Silverstone St John Horsfall Trophy (Archer) 9e
1999 Silverstone 50th St John Horsfall Trophy (S Archer) événement annulé en raison d'une piste inondée
2000 Silverstone 50th St John Horsfall Trophy (S Archer) 17e au classement général, 2e au handicap, vainqueur du Bob Fowler Trophy

Le 9 décember 2005, l'Ulster a été achetée par le vendeur, M. Alan K Beardshaw. Entre octobre 2007 et mai 2008, le fameux spécialiste de la marque, Écurie Bertelli reconstruisit F4/447/S pour assurer la sécurité tout en préservant son intégrité et en réutilisant toutes les pièces d'origine. Elle fut remise dans la couleur d'usine rouge originale selon celle retrouvée sur le côté de la voiture au cours de la reconstruction. La carrosserie conserve toujours les bosses visibles sur les photos prises au Mans en 1935 et le tableau de bord « comme il était ». F4/447/S est aussi authentique que n'importe quelle autre Ulster, même ses extensions d'ailes avant qu'on peut voir sur les photographies du Mans, installées, pense-t-on, parce que les ailes ne recouvraient pas assez les roues pour satisfaire au réglement. Suite à la restauration l'Ulster participa aux Mille Miglia Storica 2009, pilotée les fils d'Alan, Chris et Benn Beardshaw, et elle participa aussi au 75e anniversair de Donington Park en juin 2011.
Comme toutes les autres, F4/447/S figure dans l'ouvrage d'Alan Archer sur la marque, Aston Martin Ulster, publié chez Palawan Press. Inclus dans la vente, « l'Owners' Edition » de l'ouvrage Aston Martin Ulster, frappé de son propre numéro de châssis, relié en cuir avec une plaque d'aluminium gravée d'une photo de la voiture, sur la couverture. Il y a eu seulement 31 copies de « l'Owners' Edition » imprimées. Le fichier historique comprend aussi des copies des cartes originales de châssis, la facture de Chiltern Cars à Basil Scully, une sélection de photographies, dont certaines prise au Mans en 1935 et un rapport d'état récent du spécialiste de la marque Stephen Archer. La voiture est aussi vendue avec ce qui semble bien être ses sièges d'origine.
Représentant la chance d'une vie d'acquérir un exemplaire entièrement documenté d'une des sportives d'avant-guerre les plus raffinées d'Aston Martin, L4/447/S est éligible aux plus importantes manifestations historiques, y compris Le Mans et les Mille Miglia.

Elle a été invitée au St James Concourse de 2013

Lot Purple Paddle : Veuillez noter que ce lot est soumis à certaines restrictions et requiert certaines vérifications avant de pouvoir enchérir. 
Merci de nous contacter à [email protected] ou d'appeler au +44 20 7447 7447 le plus tôt possible si vous envisagez d'enchérir sur ce lot afin d'éviter tous délais de dernière minute.


Veuillez noter que, si ce véhicule est vendu à un acheteur français privé ou à un particulier membre d'un pays de l'UE, le taux réduit de TVA d'importation de 5,5% sera appliqué au prix d'adjudication. La TVA d'importation vous sera facturée par notre courtier en douane qui vous facturera aussi des frais de dédouanement. Toutefois, si vous achetez en tant que marchand ou que société, les Finances Publiques vous factureront directement (sur la base du dédouanement effectué par notre courtier en douane) et la TVA française d'importation n'apparaîtra pas sur la facture que Bonhams vous délivrera. Veuillez noter que, si vous achetez en tant que société de l'UE, vous devez payer la TVA dans votre pays d'immatriculation, au taux en vigueur. Les taux pour importation dans les autres pays de l'UE peuvent varier, et il vous sera facturé des frais administratifs relatifs à la préparation des opérations de dédouanement. Pour toute question relative au dédouanement, veuillez contacter le département Motorcar de Bonhams ou les sociétés de transport que nous recommandons.

Additional information