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The David Lloyd Collection of Modern Literature, Part II / JOHN O'HARA ON ARSE VS. ASS. O'HARA, JOHN. 1905-1970. 2 Typed Letters Signed (John O'Hara and J.O'Hara), 2 pp, 8vo, London, July 4 and July 9, 1938,

Lot 224
JOHN O'HARA ON "ARSE" VS. "ASS."
O'HARA, JOHN. 1905-1970.
2 Typed Letters Signed ("John O'Hara" and "J.O'Hara"), 2 pp, 8vo, London, July 4 and July 9, 1938,
1 – 10 August 2022, 13:00 PDT
Online, Los Angeles

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JOHN O'HARA ON "ARSE" VS. "ASS."

O'HARA, JOHN. 1905-1970. 2 Typed Letters Signed ("John O'Hara" and "J.O'Hara"), 2 pp, 8vo, London, July 4 and July 9, 1938, earlier letter with original transmittal envelope, later letter on personal letterhead, mounting remnants to verso of July 9 letter.

In the July 4 letter written to Fred Feldkamp, editor of For Men magazine, O'Hara submits an article (not present here) and informs his editor that he will be traveling through Europe for most of the summer. He also complains about payment: "I admit that I was a little surprised at the small size of the cheque for the other piece, but we can take that up when I get home. Over here every little bit helps, and anyway it takes so God damn long to argue by mail." In the July 9 letter to a Mr. Mavrogordato, O'Hara writes: "In America the word is pronounced and spelled ass. In England, where I have had one book published, and another to be published in September, they spell it your way in my books. I happen to think it's inconsistent to do that with a writer whose stuff is so completely American, but after a certain point has been reached, I always let publishers have their way."

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