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The Library of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg / SANDRA DAY O'CONNOR PRESENTATION COPY TO RUTH BADER GINSBURG. They Often Are Half Obscure The Rights of the Individual and the Legacy of Olive Wendell Holmes. Offprint from San Diego Law Review, Vol 293 (1992).

The Evolution of a Justice
Lot 14
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SANDRA DAY O'CONNOR PRESENTATION COPY TO RUTH BADER GINSBURG.
"They Often Are Half Obscure: The Rights of the Individual and the Legacy of Olive Wendell Holmes." Offprint from San Diego Law Review, Vol 29:3 (1992).
19 – 27 January 2022, 12:00 EST
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SANDRA DAY O'CONNOR PRESENTATION COPY TO RUTH BADER GINSBURG.

"They Often Are Half Obscure: The Rights of the Individual and the Legacy of Olive Wendell Holmes." Offprint from San Diego Law Review, Vol 29:3 (1992). Thin paperback, printed wrappers.

PRESENTATION COPY, WITH A LETTER LAID-IN FROM O'CONNOR TO RUTH BADER GINSBURG, dated June 4, 1993, less than two weeks before President Clinton nominated her to the Court: "Thanks for asking for a copy of my speech about Holmes...." O'Connor had a particular affection for Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, and sent this particular speech to Ginsburg weeks before the latter's own nomination speech on June 14, 1993. Ginsburg in turn quotes this paper directly in her June 14 speech in support of her view of what it means to be a "good judge" (O'Connor herself was quoting NYU law professor, Bert Neuborne): "When a modern constitutional judge is confronted with a hard case, Holmes is at her side with three gentle reminders: first, intellectual honesty about the available policy choices; second, disciplined self-restraint in respecting the majority's policy choice; and third, principled commitment to defense of individual autonomy even in the face of majority action." A fantastic association between the first two women to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court.

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