1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis
Lot 121
1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis
Sold for €212,750 (US$ 250,959) inc. premium

Lot Details
1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis 1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis
1900 Benz Ideal 4½hp Single Cylinder Vis-à-vis
Registration no. Former UK Registration "AW 487"
Car no. 2727
Engine no. 2604

The first internal combustion-engined car which performed with any degree of success was developed by German engineer Carl Benz and was a spindly three-wheeler with massive horizontally-mounted engine. Following Carl Benz's first faltering run in that car in the Autumn of 1885 the German Press wrote, 'this engine – vélocipede will make a strong appeal to a large circle, as it should prove itself quite practical and useful to doctors, travellers and lovers of sport.' This first effort developed not less than 0.9hp giving a top speed approaching 8mph. By 1892 Benz cars had four wheels and the Vélocipede (Vélo) introduced in 1894 had a single-cylinder engine developing 1.5hp.

The Velo was the best selling car of its day and engine refinements resulted in 3½hp being developed by 1895 or so. This highly successful 3½hp engine was to remain the backbone of production for Benz cars through to 1900. Many other manufacturers tried to imitate Benz's work. Benz meanwhile sold licenses to other European manufacturers such as Hurtu, Star and Marshall. The basic Benz design was to influence motor car production from 1885 to 1900 and only the arrival of the new 'Système Panhard' and also De Dion Bouton's fast-revving vertical engines were to sound its deathknell.

As with any manufacturer the product evolved over time, and they added models to the range but most adhered closely the Vélo theme. Catalogued from 1898, one of those was the "Ideal", a term which resonates in many languages and for those who wanted to get from point A to point B without a horse, it was most certainly just that. With the advent of the Ideal the body or coachwork now sat on a flat platform as opposed to the undulating Velo frame, across from the main two seats was a small additional seating space, albeit the passengers being rather exposed and out front was a small bonnet presumably to make it the car appear a little more like its front engined competitors. In this form, the Benz Patent Motorwagen would survive through to 1902, when its concepts gave way to more modern designs.

The Ideal of 1900 also featured an intermediary mechanical gearbox, which provided three speeds and reverse in the belt and chain final drive system. Solid tyres were still the order of the day in 1900 but suspension was good with full elliptic front and semi-elliptic rear springing and also a full elliptic transverse front spring.

This is a very fine example of the late Patent Motorwagen in single cylinder form and is almost certainly one of a number of these cars that were originally supplied new to Great Britain as it still wears its original supplier plaque from British Agents, Hewetson's Ltd. of London's Oxford and Dean Streets.

According to a regional newspaper article accompanying the car, it was discovered in the 1950s in 'The Midlands' region of the U.K. by two car sleuths Mr. Ralph Wilde, of Milverton Hill, Leamington Spa and Jack Moor. They had apparently heard a rumour of there being an early Benz in Builth Wells in Wales and so took a sojourn across the hills to see what he could find. Indeed there was such a car, this car, which they were able to negotiate the sale of from the widow of a man who she recalled had acquired it prior to World War One. The car secured, it was transported home and a restoration ensued. While reported at the time to have suffered from years of neglect, close inspection of the car today shows that the condition cannot have been too bad because most of its hardware is very clearly original, and in places is numbered even. Moreover it still retains its items such as its original surface vaporiser, a piece that would surely have been near impossible to have sourced in the post-war and pre-internet era, as well as its Grouvelle&Arquembourgbadged radiator.

With this work completed and the Benz returned to the road, the car would become a regular sight in Veteran Car Club of Great Britain events and the annual London to Brighton Run. It would become the outright property of Mr. Moor and later that of his family for more than 50 years, before passing to another local enthusiast where it has lived since.

During Mr. Moor's ownership, the Benz was brought to the attention of the Veteran Car Club of Great Britain, and received confirmation of its build date as 1900 in their dating process.

As attested to by its current owner, a late series Benz is as the company intended at the time a far more practical and usable automobile than its earlier brethren. Specifically its three speed gearbox allows for a true intermediary gear, in addition to the 'crawl' for hills and 'direct drive' for level ground options. Matched to the large, sturdy single cylinder 4½hp engine, it is reported to 'bowl' along the road happily at speeds in excess of 20mph and that are more than ample relative to their stopping capabilities! For the purist, it is also worth noting that the car runs 'beautifully' on its vaporiser and using Hexane fuel.

With its simple ownership, and sympathetically aged presentation, this fine Patent Motor Wagen would be a perfect cornerstone to any serious car collection, and allow its new owner to experience the dawn of motoring in very manageable and drivable form.

1900 Benz Ideal 4½ PS Einzylinder Vis-à-vis
UK Zulassung "AW 487"
Wagen no. 2727
Motor no. 2604

Das erste Automobil mit einem Verbrennungsmotor, das einigermaβen zufriedenstellende Fahrleistungen hatte, war von dem deutschen Ingenieur Carl Benz entwickelt worden und war ein staksiges Dreirad mit einem massiven, waagerecht eingebauten Motor. Anlässlich der ersten von Carl Benz in der Öffentlichkeit durchgeführten Fahrt im Herbst 1885 schrieben deutsche Zeitungen: ,,Dieses motorisierte Dreirad wird einen großen Kreis von Interessenten ansprechen, die den praktischen Nutzen des Fahrzeuges für sich zu schätzen wissen, wie zum Beispiel Ärzte, Handelsreisende oder sportlich Begeisterte." Dieser erste Motor entwickelte eine Leistung von 0,9 PS und ermöglichte dem Benz-Dreirad eine Höchstgeschwindigkeit von12 km/h. Ab 1892 hatten Benz Automobile vier Räder. Bei der Vorstellung des Vélociped (Vélo) im Jahre 1894, hatte der Einzylinder-Motor eine Leistung von 1,5 PS.

Das Vélo war das meistverkaufte Fahrzeug seiner Zeit. In der Zeit um 1895 leistete der weiterentwickelte Motor 3,5 PS. Dieser erfolgreiche 3,5 PS Motor sollte das Rückgrat der Produktion von Benz Automobilen bis 1900 bleiben. Viele andere Hersteller versuchten Benz zu kopieren. Benz konnte unterdessen Lizenzen an andere Hersteller wie zum Beispiel Hurtu, Star und Marshall verkaufen. Das Funktionsprinzip der Benz Modelle beeinflusste die weltweite Automobilproduktion in der Zeit von 1885 bis 1900 grundlegend. Nur die Entwicklung der neuen Motoren nach dem System Panhard und die senkrecht stehenden und mit höherer Drehzahl laufenden Motoren von De Dion Bouton läuteten dessen Ende ein.

Benz, wie auch andere Hersteller, entwickelten ihre Konstruktion weiter fort und fügten andere Modelle in das Modellprogramm mit ein, die sich aber immer noch stark am Velo orientierten. Eines dieser Modelle war der ab 1898 im Katalog auftauchende ,,Ideal", ein Begriff, der in vielen Sprachen positive Konnotationen hatte und ideal war für diejenigen, die ohne Pferd von A nach B gelangen wollten.

Mit der Einführung des Ideal saβ die Karosserie nun tiefer auf einer flacheren Plattform, im Gegensatz zu dem welligen Rahmen des Velo. Gegenüber den beiden Hauptsitzen war noch eine kleinere Bank für Passagiere angebracht und an der Front gab es eine kleine Haube, die wohl an die Konkurrenzmodelle mit Frontmotor erinnern sollte. In dieser Form blieb der Benz Patent Motorwagen bis zum Jahre 1902 im Programm und wurde dann durch modernere Entwicklungen ersetzt.

Der Ideal des Jahres 1900 verfügte auβerdem über ein zwischengeschaltetes mechanisches Getriebe mit drei Vorwärtsgängen und einem Rückwärtsgang in dem riehmen- und kettengesteuerten Achsantrieb. Vollgummireifen waren 1900 noch an der Tagesordnung, aber die Federung mit voll-elliptischen Federn an der Vorderachse und halb-elliptischen an der Hinterachse sowie einer weiteren voll-elliptischen querliegenden Feder vorne war gut.

Dies ist ein ausgezeichneter Vertreter des späteren Patent Motorwagens mit dem Einzylinder und ist mit groβer Wahrscheinlichkeit eines der wenigen nach Groβbritannien exportierten Fahrzeuge, trägt es doch noch immer die originale Plakette des Britischen Importeurs Hewetson's Ltd. mit Sitz in London's Oxford Street und Dean Street.

Laut eines beiliegenden Zeitungsartikels aus der Lokalpresse wurde der Wagen in den fünfziger Jahren in den englischen Midlands von zwei ausgesprochenen Auto-Spürhunden, Ralph Wilde aus Milverton Hill bei LeamingtonSpa und Jack Moor, entdeckt. Sie hatten von einem Gerücht gehört, dass sich ein früher Benz in Builth Wells in Wales befindet und machten sich auf den Weg in die Hügel, um zu sehen, was sie finden konnten. Sie fanden den Wagen schlieβlich und kauften ihn einer Witwe ab, dessen verstorbener Gemahl den Wagen vor dem ersten Weltkrieg erworben hatte. Der Benz wurde verzurrt, nach Hause gebracht und die Restaurierung begann. Damals wurde berichtet, dass der Benz lange vernachlässigt worden war. Nach heutiger Prüfung kann es jedoch nicht so schlimm gewesen sein, da der Groβteil der Komponenten eindeutig immer noch original ist und teilweise sogar nummeriert ist. Auβerdem sind Teile wie der originale Oberflächenverdampfer noch anwesend, ein Teil, dass in den Nachkriegsjahre und vor Einführung des Internets wohl nicht aufzufinden gewesen wäre. Dazu gehört auch der Kühler mit seiner Grouvelle&Arquembourg Plakette.

Während im Besitz von Herrn Moor wurde der Wagen dem Veteran Car Club of Great Britain vorgeführt, der dem Benz das Produktionsjahr 1900 attestierte.

Der aktuelle Besitzer kann bestätigen, dass der spätere Benz ein weitaus praktischeres und nutzbareres Gefährt ist als seine Vorgänger. Insbesondere das Dreiganggetriebe erlaubt eine bessere Nutzung mithilfe des wahren Zwischenganges, der dem ersten Gang zur Bezwingung von Steigungen und dem dritten Gang für den Einsatz auf ebener Straβe zur Seite steht. In Verbindung mit dem groβen und robusten Einzylinder mit 4 ½ PS erreicht der Wagen eine Geschwindigkeiten von über 32 km/h - mehr als genug, vor allem in Hinblick auf die Bremsleistung! Den Puristen wird erfreuen, dass der Wagen sehr schön läuft, mit seinem Verdampfer und Hexan-Benzin.

Dieser einfach zu operierende Patent Motorwagen mit seiner angenehmen Patina wäre ein Eckpfeiler jeder ernstzunehmenden Sammlung und erlaubt seinem neuen Besitzer, die Urzeit des Automobils in einer sehr gut nutz- und fahrbaren Form zu genieβen.
Activities
Auction information

This auction is now finished. If you are interested in consigning in future auctions, please contact the specialist department. If you have queries about lots purchased in this auction, please contact customer services.

Buyers' Obligations

ALL BIDDERS MUST AGREE THAT THEY HAVE READ AND UNDERSTOOD BONHAMS' CONDITIONS OF SALE AND AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THEM, AND AGREE TO PAY THE BUYER'S PREMIUM AND ANY OTHER CHARGES MENTIONED IN THE NOTICE TO BIDDERS. THIS AFFECTS THE BIDDERS LEGAL RIGHTS.

If you have any complaints or questions about the Conditions of Sale, please contact your nearest customer services team.

Buyers' Premium and Charges

BUYERS' PREMIUM AND CHARGES
Buyer's Premium Rates

Motor Cars
15% on the Hammer Price

Automobilia
25% up to the first €50,000 of the Hammer Price
20% from €50,001 to €1,000,000 of the Hammer Price
12% on the balance thereafter

Mwst/Ust at the current rate of 19% will be added to the Buyer's Premium

Shipping Notices

For information and estimates on domestic and international shipping as well as export licences please contact Bonhams Shipping Department.

Contacts
  1. Philip Kantor
    Specialist - Motor Cars
    Bonhams
    Work
    Boulevard Saint-Michel 101
    Brussels, Belgium 1040
    Work +33 1 42 61 10 11
    FaxFax: +33 1 42 61 10 15
Similar Items