A fine woven Mughal Carpet Fragment India, circa 1650
Lot 216W
A fine woven Mughal Carpet Fragment
India, circa 1650
Sold for £40,000 (US$ 68,027) inc. premium
Auction Details
Lot Details
A fine woven Mughal Carpet Fragment
India, circa 1650
wool on a cotton foundation, triple-wefted with silk middle weft, assymetrically knotted, in shades of green, yellow, blue and red, depicting a martagan lily with drooping flower-heads, a poppy, an iris and a carnation, flanked by smaller flowering plants and tiny cloud bands, all highlighted against the dark red ground; the border with stylised floral rosettes set amongst scrolling leafy tendrils, mounted
152 x 51 cm.

Footnotes

  • Provenance:
    Private US collection 2007-2012;
    Private London Collection 1979-2007.

    Published:
    Simon Ray, Indian and Islamic Works of Art, Exhibition Catalogue, 1st November to 30th November 2012, pp. 198-97, no. 91.

    This fragment belongs to a category of Mughal carpet that has become known as a "shaped carpet". Usually made in pairs, its basic rectangular form has a curved or stepped arch along one side, with arms of various shapes at both ends made to fit around a central space. Their exact function has not been established, but they are often thought to have enclosed the base of a fountain, a throne or some other architectural element, although the flowers could only be viewed properly if viewed by someone sitting within the central void. This particular fragmentary section formed the right end of one such carpet, the original orientation being vertical.

    These shaped carpets have been associated with the Jaipur royal collection, though they were probably made in Lahore, which together with Agra, was one of the main carpet making centres during the reign of the emperor Akbar. According to Amina Okada, who discusses a similar carpet fragment in the Collection AEDTA in Paris, they are known as "Jaipur carpets" because they appear to have been commissioned for the old Amber palace that was completed about 1630, and then transferred to the Jaipur palace around 1875 (Amina Okada and Marie-Helene Guelton, Le Motif floral dans les tissus moghols: Inde XVIIe et XVIIIe siecles, Paris, 1995, pl. 6).

    A.J.D. Campbell noted sixteen such shaped carpets in the Jaipur collection in 1929, when under the auspices of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, he studied the collection of antique carpets in the Jaipur Palace (ibid.). By 1973 about half of these shaped carpets in the collection had been given away. Probably there were several more in fragmentary condition such as this example as quite a number of fragmentary examples are known from public and private collections, the most notable of the latter being that in the collection of the late Krishna Riboud at AEDTA. For two examples of complete carpets, see Daniel Walker, Flowers Underfoot: Indian Carpets of The Mughal Era, New York, 1997, p. 104, fig. 101, cat. no. 25, now in the Cincinnati Art Museum; and fig. 102, in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

    The naturalistic form of the floral decoration that is evident throughout the arts of the Mughals, began to develop in the period of the emperor Jahangir, and was partly influenced by European herbals, which were known to the Mughal court artists. However, Jahangir's visit to Kashmir in the spring of 1620 was probably the main influence, the intoxicating beauty of the local flora greatly affecting his taste in design.
Activities
Auction information

This auction is now finished. If you are interested in consigning in future auctions, please contact the specialist department. If you have queries about lots purchased in this auction, please contact customer services.

Buyers' Obligations

ALL BIDDERS MUST AGREE THAT THEY HAVE READ AND UNDERSTOOD BONHAMS' CONDITIONS OF SALE AND AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THEM, AND AGREE TO PAY THE BUYER'S PREMIUM AND ANY OTHER CHARGES MENTIONED IN THE NOTICE TO BIDDERS. THIS AFFECTS THE BIDDERS LEGAL RIGHTS.

If you have any complaints or questions about the Conditions of Sale, please contact your nearest customer services team.

Buyers' Premium and Charges

For all Sales categories excluding Wine, Coins & Medals and Motor Cars and Motorcycles:

Buyer's Premium Rates
25% on the first £50,000 of the Hammer Price
20% from £50,001 to £1,000,000 the Hammer Price
12% from £1,000,001 of the Hammer Price

VAT at the current rate of 20% will be added to the Buyer's Premium and charges excluding Artists Resale Right.

Payment Notices

Payment in advance: by cash, check with banker's card, credit card, bank draft or traveler's cheque.

Payment at collection: by credit or debit card.

Credit card charges: a surcharge of 2% is applicable when using Mastercard, Visa and overseas debit cards.

Shipping Notices

For information and estimates on domestic and international shipping as well as export licenses please contact Bonhams Shipping Department.

Lot symbols
W Shipping & handling restrictions apply

Objects displayed with a w will be located in the Bonhams Warehouse and will only be available for collection from this location.

Contacts
  1. Oliver White
    Specialist - Islamic and Indian Art
    Bonhams
    Work
    101 New Bond Street
    London, United Kingdom W1S 1SR
    Work +44 20 7468 8303
    FaxFax: +44 20 7468 8283