Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828
Lot 21*
Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal
North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828
Sold for £110,500 (US$ 187,926) inc. premium
Auction Details
Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828 Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828
Lot Details
Firdausi, Shahnama, The Book of Kings, lavishly illustrated with one hundred and ten miniatures, copied by the scribe Nizam-ad-Din, formerly in the library of the last Nawab of Bengal
North India, probably Kashmir, dated 3rd Jumada al-Thani AH 1244/ 11th November AD 1828
Persian manuscript on thin cream-coloured paper, 561 leaves, 25 lines to the page written in four columns of neat nasta'liq script in black ink, interlinear gilt cloudband decoration, intercolumnar rules with gilt vegetal decoration on blue ground, inner margins ruled in blue and gold, catchwords, headings written in blue on gilt rectangular panels, one finely illuminated frontispiece in two shades of gold and blue, inner borders decorated with intertwining flower heads in red, white and blue, three illuminated headpieces marking the beginning of books II to IV of the Shahnama, three seal impressions and Persian inscription on folio 1r, later green morocco gilt, doublures of red paper, spine loose, covers of Indian brocade
leaf 290 x 176 mm.

Footnotes

  • Provenance:
    Private US collection since 1930;
    Poohoomull Bros., dealers ('shippers of certain Artistic Antiquities'), Bombay, from March 1930 (according to a typewritten note accompanying the manuscript);
    Muhammad Abdullah Khatkhatoy (unidentified), of Hyderabad, Deccan (according to the note);
    'Mir Ghazanfar 'Ali, a member of the family of the Nizam of Hyderabad (late 19th Century);
    Faridun Jah's first wife, Shams-e Jahan Baygum Sahiba (1830-1905);
    Faridun Jah, Muntazim ul-Mulk, Mohsin ud-Daula, Nawab Sayyid Mansur 'Ali Khan Bahadur, Nusrat Jang, Nawab Nazim of Bengal, Bihar and Orissa (1830-1884, reg. 1838-1880).


    The seal impressions on folio 1r. are as follows:

    Single seal: Mir Ghazanfar 'Ali [AH] 1312/ AD 1894-5.

    Note above the seal:
    Nomreh 86. Shahnameh ma'a tasvirat khosh-khatt kateb na-ma'lum nayab
    'No. 86. Shahnama with illustrations, [written] in a fine hand, unknown scribe, rare'.
    The seal: Muntazim al-Mulk, Muhsin al-Dawla, Faridun Jah Sayyid Mansur 'Ali Khan Nusrat Jang Bahadur 12[?]6

    Note below the seal:
    az ketab-khaneh-ye sarkar-e fayz athar 'enayat be-navvab shams-e jahan beygom saheba sana 1276
    'From the Library of the one who has vestiges of grace, it was given to Nawab Shams-e Jahan Baygum Sahiba, the year AH 1276/ 1859-60'.

    The seal: Nawwab Shams Jahan Baygum, the year 1262 of the hijra/ AD 1846).

    Faridun Jah was the last Nawab of Bengal. He was born at Murshidabad in 1830 and succeeded to the throne on the death of his father in October 1838. The East India Company reduced his honours from a 19-gun to a 13-gun salute for his alleged complicity in the murder of two servants in 1854. Following a long period of financial embarrassment, he was forced to renounce all his rights in return for the liquidation of his debts and a generous annual pension of £10,000. He left for England in 1869, living in Maidenhead, and remained there until his return to India in 1881, though not before abdicating in favour of his eldest son in 1880. He died of cholera at Murshidabad in 1884. (For extended biographical details see http://www.royalark.net/India4/murshid13.htm).

    A richly illuminated Kashmiri Qur'an, dated AH 1275/ AD 1858-59, also from the library of Faridun Jah, was sold in these rooms: Bonhams, Islamic and Indian Art, 2nd October 2012, lot 30. In the same sale were two Qajar Resht standards, made for Faridun Jah (lot 143).

    Kashmiri Manuscripts and the Shahnama:
    Book illustration was practiced in Kashmir from the mid-15th Century onward, and had developed its own style by the 17th and 18th Centuries which was greatly influenced by Mughal painting. In the 19th Century lavishly illustrated manuscripts remained in demand by both Muslim and Sikh patrons, and as Pratapaditya Pal comments, 'it is clear, by and large, the Kashmiri preferred a more archaic version of the decorative and idealized manner associated with Persian tradition, with perfunctory borrowings from the Mughal style. While the Mughal style might not have captured the Kashmiri imagination, the interest in pictures, especially illustrated books, was rekindled by the Mughal presence'. Pal observes that the Muslim patron had a penchant for illustrated manuscripts of popular Persian literature such as Firdausi's 11th-Century epic Shahnama, pictorial romances such as the Khamsa of Nizami and other poetic and didactic works.

    This manuscript compares closely with a Shahnama, circa 1825, with 66 miniatures which entered the New York Public Library as part of the Lennox Collection, described by Barbara Schmitz as an outstanding example of the Kashmir book. Schmitz adds: "it is one of a group of deluxe Shahnamas, with huge illustration cycles, that includes a copy dated AH 1244/ AD 1828 with 102 miniatures that was sold at a London auction in 1979; one dated AH 1245/ AD 1830 with 95 miniatures in the Staatsbibliothek, Berlin in which the colophon states that the manuscript was copied "in the country of Kashmir [which] resembles paradise"; and another Shahnama of AH 1251/ AD 1830 with 77, sold at the Hotel Drouot in Paris in 1982. Two other Shahnamas from the Spencer Collection show the disintegration of the style by mid-century and the gradual constriction of the miniature cycle'. There is no doubt that this Shahnama of 1828 with 110 miniatures can be added to this select group of deluxe Shahnamas.

    Bibliography:
    Stchoukine et al, Illuminierte Islamische Handschriften, p. 201.
    Adamova and Greck, Miniatyuri Kashmirskikh Eutopisey [Miniatures from Kashmir in Manuscripts], Leningrad 1976.
    Sotheby's, Oriental Manuscripts and Miniatures, 24 April 1979, lot 293.
    Hotel Drouot, Laurin, Guilloux, Buffetard et Tailleur sale, 23 June 1982, lot 79.
    J. P. Losty, The Art of the Book in India, London 1982.
    B. Schmitz, Islamic Manuscripts in the New York Public Library, Oxford and New York 1992, pp. 158-163, cat. no. III.15.
    P. Pal, The Arts of Kashmir, Milan 2007.


    The subjects of the miniatures are as follows:

    1. Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni enthroned.
    2. Jamshid brought as prisoner before Zuhhak.
    3. The captive Zuhhak brought before Faridun.
    4. Faridun mourning Iraj.
    5. Minuchihr fighting Salm.
    6. Sam finds Zal and the simurgh on Mount Alburz.
    7. Rudabeh watches Zal climb up to her balcony.
    8. The caesarean birth of Rustam in the presence of the simurgh.
    9. Rustam killing the white elephant.
    10. The battle between Afrasiyab and Naudar.
    11. Afrasiyab killing the captive Naudar.
    12. Rustam seizing Afrasiyab by the belt.
    13. Afrasiyab watch the dragon as it swallows his chariot.
    14. Afrasiyab kills the dragon.
    15. Rustam meeting Tahmineh for the first time.
    16. Rustam sleeping while his horse Raksh fights the lion (tiger)(first stage)
    17. Rustam and Raksh fighting the dragon (third stage).
    18. Rustam killing the White Div in a dark pit to obtain blood from its liver to restore the sight of Kai Ka'us, watched by Ulad who is tied to a tree.
    19. Rustam in a fight before an enthroned ruler, probably the King of Mazandaran
    20. Rustam seizes a foe in battle.
    21. Rustam about to lassoo a foe in battle.
    22. Battle scene in front of a fort.
    23. Suhrab defeating Rustam in their first battle.
    24. Rustam killing Suhrab.
    25. Rustam pleading for Siyavush before Kai Ka'us.
    26. Sudabeh tempting Siyavush.
    27. The fire ordeal of Siyavush watched by Kai Ka'us and Sudabeh.
    28. Siyavush meeting Afrasiyab.
    29. Rustam meeting Kai Ka'us.
    30. Afrasiyab playing polo with Siyavush.
    31. Farangis, daughter of Afrasiyab and wife of Siyavush, crossing the Jaihun (Oxus) river with Giv and Kai Khusrau.
    32. Farangis watches Afrasiyab and Siyavush playing polo.
    33. Afrasiyab watching Garvi cutting the throat of Siyavush.
    34. Kai Khusrau petitioned by the family of Afrasiyab.
    35. Rustam fighting Pilsam in battle.
    36. Rustam giving an audience in Turan.
    37. Giv crossing the Oxus river with Kai Khursrau and Farangis.
    38. Kai Khusrau and Giv at the court of Kai Ka'us.
    39. Farud fighting the Iranians.
    40. Battle scene between Iranians and Turanians on a hillside.
    41. Kamus fighting Tus and Giv.
    42. Rustam about to take Kamus prisoner after killing his horse.
    43. Rustam unhorsing Shangal in battle.
    44. Rustam wrestling with Puladvand.
    45. Rustam at the court of Kai Khusrau.
    46. Bizhan feasting with Manizheh.
    47. Rustam travels to Turan where he is asked by Manizheh to rescue Bizhan.
    48. Rustam rescuing Bizhan from the pit watched by Manizheh.
    49. Encounter between Rustam and Afrasiyab before battle commences.
    50. Meeting between Rustam and Barzu.
    51. Rustam fighting Barzu.
    52. Barzu saved by his mother from Rustam.
    53. Susan, the Turanian woman musician, asleep in a tent.
    54. Rustam about to fight Pilsam.
    55. Rustam watches Pilsam being beheaded.
    56. Afrasiyab fighting Kai Khusrau.
    57. Human fighting Bizhan on the ground in revenge for killing Siyavush.
    58. Giv hearing Gudarz relating the dream of Kai Khusrau.
    59. Giv fighting in battle.
    60. Afrasiyab receiving Kai Khusrau.
    61. Shida killed by Kai Khusrau.
    62. Kai Khusrau receives the son of Afrasiyab.
    63. Kai Khusrau receives Rustam.
    64. Family of Afrasiyab asking Kai Khusrau for mercy.
    65. Kai Khusrau receives the envoy of Faghfur of Chin.
    66. Kai Khusrau and Kai Kaus entertained in a garden.
    67. Kai Khusrau beheads Afrasiyab.
    68. The court of the Kaisar of Rum.
    69. Gushtasp killing the dragon.
    70. Gushtasp killing the dragon.
    71. Gushtasp, son of Lahrasp, sends letter to Arjasp.
    72. Battle between Bidarafsh and Zarir, brother of Gushtasp.
    73. An elderly ruler killed in battle falls off his horse.
    74. Isfandiyar, son of Gushtasp, about to fight Arjasp.
    75. Isfandiyar killing lions.
    76. Isfandiyar being revived after being overcome by the heat of the dragon's breath. The dragon lies in a pool of blood next to Isfandiyar's chariot (third stage).
    77. Isfandiyar recognised by his sisters in the Brazen Fort.
    78. Isfandiyar killing Arjasp in the Brazen Fort.
    79. Isfandiyar demanding the throne from his father Gushtasp.
    80. Rustam meeting Bahman.
    81. Rustam meeting Isfandiyar for the first time.
    82. Simurgh summoned by Zal to help Rustam and Rakhsh.
    83. Isfandiyar shot in the eyes by Rustam.
    84. Rustam impaled in the pit of spears on Rakhsh having shot Shaghad through the tree.
    85. Bahman watching Faramurz impaled and shot with arrows.
    86. Humay having recognised Darab as her son, places him on the throne.
    87. Iskandar comforting the dying Dara.
    88. Celebrations to mark the accession of Iskandar announced by letter.
    89. Battle between Iskandar and Fur(Porus).
    90. Iskandar received by Kaidafeh (Nushabeh).
    91. Israfil holding his large golden trumpet watched by Iskandar.
    92. Ardashir ordering the execution of Ardavan.
    93. Ta'ir brought before his daughter and Shapur.
    94. Shapur watches the beheading of Ta'ir.
    95. Bahram Gur showing off his hunting prowess watched by Azadeh.
    96. Bahram Gur hunting waterfowl preceded by two falconers.
    97. Bahram Gur hunting lions(tigers).
    98. Battle between Khushnavaz and Firuz.
    99. The court of Anushirvan.
    100. Anushirvan leading a hunting party with falconers and salukis.
    101. Anushirvan dispensing justice.
    102. Anushirvan watches a chess game sent to him by the King of Hind.
    103. Bahram Chubin captures Saveh.
    104. An audience scene.
    105. Bahram Gur with a princess in a pavilion and hunting wild ass.
    106. Bahram Gur entertained.
    107. Bahram Gur meeting the old woman.
    108. The accession of Khusrau Parviz.
    109. An audience scene with Ardashir.
    110. The battle between Rustam and Sa'd bin Waqqas.
Activities
Auction information

This auction is now finished. If you are interested in consigning in future auctions, please contact the specialist department. If you have queries about lots purchased in this auction, please contact customer services.

Buyers' Obligations

ALL BIDDERS MUST AGREE THAT THEY HAVE READ AND UNDERSTOOD BONHAMS' CONDITIONS OF SALE AND AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THEM, AND AGREE TO PAY THE BUYER'S PREMIUM AND ANY OTHER CHARGES MENTIONED IN THE NOTICE TO BIDDERS. THIS AFFECTS THE BIDDERS LEGAL RIGHTS.

If you have any complaints or questions about the Conditions of Sale, please contact your nearest customer services team.

Buyers' Premium and Charges

For all Sales categories excluding Wine, Coins & Medals and Motor Cars and Motorcycles:

Buyer's Premium Rates
25% on the first £50,000 of the Hammer Price
20% from £50,001 to £1,000,000 the Hammer Price
12% from £1,000,001 of the Hammer Price

VAT at the current rate of 20% will be added to the Buyer's Premium and charges excluding Artists Resale Right.

Payment Notices

Payment in advance: by cash, check with banker's card, credit card, bank draft or traveler's cheque.

Payment at collection: by credit or debit card.

Credit card charges: a surcharge of 2% is applicable when using Mastercard, Visa and overseas debit cards.

Shipping Notices

For information and estimates on domestic and international shipping as well as export licenses please contact Bonhams Shipping Department.

Lot symbols
* Import low rate

VAT on imported items at a preferential rate of 5% on Hammer Price and the prevailing rate on Buyer's Premium.

Contacts
  1. Oliver White
    Specialist - Islamic and Indian Art
    Bonhams
    Work
    101 New Bond Street
    London, United Kingdom W1S 1SR
    Work +44 20 7468 8303
    FaxFax: +44 20 7468 8283