A rare Dresden engraved silver-gilt mounted armorial Rubinglas teapot, Dresden, circa 1713-18, the mounts circa 1750
Lot 29
A rare Dresden engraved silver-gilt mounted armorial Rubinglas teapot, Dresden, circa 1713-18, the mounts circa 1750
Sold for £18,750 (US$ 31,515) inc. premium
Lot Details
A rare Dresden engraved silver-gilt mounted armorial Rubinglas teapot, Dresden, circa 1713-18, the mounts circa 1750
The compressed globular form with short cylindrical neck and applied S-shaped spout, decorated on one side with the cypher AR within tied oak and olive leaf fronds, surmounted by a crown, the other side with Royal arms of Saxony and Poland surmounted by a crown and flanked by oak leaves and olive fronds, with silver-gilt foot, hinged cover and handle with foliate scroll, 9.4cm high, the foot marked for Schwerino Bergkstädt, Dresden, Master 1749-1772

Footnotes

  • Provenance:
    Anon. sale, Sotheby's, 10 February 1986, lot 178

    Literature:
    Dedo von Kerssenbrock-Krosigk, Rubinglas des ausgehenden 17. und des 18. Jahrhunderts (2001), p.224, no.282

    For two identical examples: in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg and in a private collection respectively, see von Kerssenbrock-Krosigk, op.cit, p.224, no.281, fig and no.283. The author suggests that as all three teapots bear the same characteristics it is likely that they come from the same service. He also proposes (op.cit, pp.107-108) that with the mounts dating to the 1750s the teapots were produced after this date.

    However, Sabine Baumgärtner, Sächsiches Glas (1977), pp.82-84 has previously argued that the glass may have been made circa 1713-18 by Johann Böttger. Böttger experimented with glass recipes at the Ostra Glasshouse in Dresden to produce ruby glass to rival that produced by Georg Ernst Kunckel at Potsdam. This argument is supported by the shape of the teapot which conforms to styles in Meissen porcelain of this date rather than to those quite different fashions of the 1750s. It is unlikely that such a Baroque form would be manufactured in the mid 18th century, even as a souvenir of the past. Therefore, the coat of arms is likely to represent Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland, the founder of the Meissen factory and Böttger's employer.

Saleroom notices

  • Please note that there is a short internal crack to the neck and shoulder, beside the handle
Activities
Contacts
  1. Simon Cottle
    Specialist - Glass
    Bonhams
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