An early 19th Century French 'Palais Royal' pressed gilt brass and mother of pearl veneered novelty jewellery casket
Lot 288
An early 19th Century French 'Palais Royal' pressed gilt brass and mother of pearl veneered novelty jewellery casket
Sold for £3,250 (US$ 5,462) inc. premium
Auction Details
An early 19th Century French 'Palais Royal' pressed gilt brass and mother of pearl veneered novelty jewellery casket
Lot Details
An early 19th Century French 'Palais Royal' pressed gilt brass and mother of pearl veneered novelty jewellery casket
formed as a miniature dressing chest in the Empire taste, the rectangular swing framed mirror above a hinged top, the front with a verre eglomise fall flap decorated with a rustic cottage landscape roundel within a shield shaped mount on a blue ground, flanked by rectangular pilasters and raised on paw feet, the pink silk lined interior containing two scraps of paper, the first inscribed in ink 'This pretty toy was given to Georgina when she was ten years old by the Princefs(sic), Mary, Duchess of Gloucester, who had requested to see her', the other later inscribed in ink 'Bought from Charlotte, April 1855' with typical old wear and losses to the silvering of the mirror and the verre eglomise decoration, 25cm high, 15cm wide, 8cm deep

Footnotes

  • Provenance:
    By repute originally the property of Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester.


    Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh (25 April 1776 – 30 April 1857) was the eleventh child and fourth daughter of King George III.

    The Princess married her cousin, Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh when both were 40 and was his widow in later life. In her last years, her niece, Victoria, was on the throne as the fourth monarch during Mary's life, after her father and two of her brothers. Princess Mary was the longest-lived (at 81 years) and last survivor of George III's fifteen children; of those fifteen issue, thirteen lived to adulthood. She was also the only one of George III's children to be photographed and died on 30 April 1857 at Gloucester House, London.

Saleroom notices

  • Please note that the second piece of paper is inscribed in ink 'Bought from Charlton, April 1855' Revised provenance*: By repute originally the property of Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester. Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh (25 April 1776 – 30 April 1857) was the eleventh child and fourth daughter of King George III. The Princess married her cousin, Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh when both were 40 and was his widow in later life. In her last years, her niece, Victoria, was on the throne as the fourth monarch during Mary's life, after her father and two of her brothers. Princess Mary was the longest-lived (at 81 years) and last survivor of George III's fifteen children; of those fifteen issue, thirteen lived to adulthood. She was also the only one of George III's children to be photographed and died on 30 April 1857 at Gloucester House, London. Collection (from the collection) of Lord and Lady Allerton of Thorp Arch, Boston Spa, Weatherby, Yorkshire via the marriage of Lord Allerton, George William Jackson, 3rd Baron to Christine Joyce Hatfield in 1926 via the Hatfeild family line and thence by decent. *Further to the revised catalogue entry regarding new provenance that the piece was purchased at 'Charlton' in 1855 this would appear to suggest that the piece was most likely purchased from Charlton Park in Cheltenham and that 'Georgina' – the girl who is mentioned on the first piece of paper as being given the piece by the Duchess of Gloucester (and who was herself childless after marrying later in life) possibly lived or had connections with the house. Although as yet there is no definite evidence that Georgina lived at the Charlton Park from records of the various occupants of the house in the late 18th and early 19th century, further weight to this possible provenance can be affirmed by the fact that the Princess Mary (as she was previously known) had connections with Cheltenham via her father George III who regularly came to take the waters with his family in the late 18th century and also later with her own husband the Duke of Gloucester whom she married in 1819 (the year that they also visited the town to inaugurate the Gold Cup).
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  1. Kate Eskdale
    Specialist - European Sculpture and Works of Art
    Bonhams
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