A set of 8 George III giltwood open armchairs  attributed to John Linnell
Lot 97
A set of eight George III giltwood open armchairs attributed to John Linnell
Sold for £12,500 (US$ 21,010) inc. premium
Auction Details
A set of eight George III giltwood open armchairs  attributed to John Linnell A set of 8 George III giltwood open armchairs  attributed to John Linnell A set of 8 George III giltwood open armchairs  attributed to John Linnell A set of 8 George III giltwood open armchairs  attributed to John Linnell
Lot Details
A set of eight George III giltwood open armchairs
attributed to John Linnell
The oval padded medallion backs within fluted surrounds, the padded arms with moulded ball terminals, on fluted inswept supports, the padded bowed seats with fluted seat rails, on ring turned tapering legs and spool feet, four upholstered in blue cotton and four in pink silk, originally painted, two chairs inscribed 'H.B' to the seat rail, one inscribed 'W.H', three chairs variously signed 'Howard'(?), evidence of clamp marks to one corner block of some chairs, some chairs with packing nails, one chair with baton holes.(8)

Footnotes

  • The ball arm terminals are a typical feature of Linnell seat furniture and appear on a set of armchairs supplied to Robert Child (d.1782) of Osterley Park (circa 1768) for either Osterley Park or for 38 Berkeley Square. See H.Hayward, William and John Linnell, Eighteenth Century London Furniture Makers, Studio Vista, London, 1980, plate 71. See also plate 86a (Ibid.) for a design for an oval backed armchair, with the same ball arm terminals.

    John Linnell's apprenticeship as a cabinet-maker was unusual. In addition to training with his father William's firm on Long Acre he also attended Hogarth's St Martin's Lane Academy where he studied drawing and design in an international, intellectual environment. John Linnell's artistic talent had an immediate impact upon the firm, when he joined his father full time in 1753, specialising in rococo design. Linnell's flair for design combined with his St. Martin's Lane connections lead to his awareness of Delafosse, far in advance of his fellow cabinet-makers. This in turn inspired him to incorporate neo-classicism into his designs by the early date of 1760. His patterns from this period demonstrate his exploration the new style and the results were both novel and eclectic as he searched for new combinations of form and ornament. By 1762 Linnell was working with Robert Adam at Kedleston Hall, followed by Osterley Park in 1767. Through his direct contact with Adam, the eclectic designs of Linnell were gradually replaced with an increasingly refined, pure neo-classicism that was fully established by 1775.
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    Specialist - English Furniture and Works of Art
    Bonhams
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    United Kingdom
    Work +44 20 8963 2847
    FaxFax: +44 20 8963 2807
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