GEORGE III. Autograph letter signed ("George R"), to his Lord Chancellor (Lord Thurlow), giving news of his improved health, 1789
Lot 77*
GEORGE III. Autograph letter signed ("George R"), to his Lord Chancellor (Lord Thurlow), giving news of his improved health, 1789
Sold for £2,062 (US$ 3,466) inc. premium
Lot Details
GEORGE III
Autograph letter signed ("George R"), to his Lord Chancellor (Lord Thurlow), giving news of his improved health: "The interest the Lord Chancellor ever takes in what regards me, makes it necessary just to add that the Sea Air seems perfectly to agree, though I cannot say I regain that chearfulness I expected, but then I must add that by a complaint in an Ear I have lost one Week's bathing an only began again this morning. The Chancellor may depend on my giving due time for the effects of the Sea Air and the bathing, and that I will cautiously pursue the mode prescribed and not by impatience destroy the advantage proposed"; and giving his assent that Lloyd should be appointed KC ("...I had no person in my mind when I asked whether the Chancellor had an intention of proposing more to the Rank of King's Counsel..."), one page, integral blank, light dust-staining on verso, 4to, Weymouth, 16 July 1789

Footnotes

  • 'I CANNOT SAY I REGAIN THAT CHEARFULNESS I EXPECTED' – KING GEORGE III CONVALESCES FROM MADNESS. The King had shown symptoms of illness (now widely thought to have been porphyria) in the summer of the previous year and by December was so ill he was placed under the care of Dr Willis, who confined him to a straight-jacket and restraining chair. But three days before the Regency Bill was due to take effect that February he showed signs of recovery, and a service of thanksgiving was held at St Paul's that April. He remained weak however. The resolution the King makes in this letter – written two days after the Fall of the Bastille, to his trusted advisor Lord Thurlow – that he "will cautiously pursue the mode prescribed and not by impatience destroy the advantage proposed" clearly reflects the methods of Willis, the mad-doctor who had so recently treated him, who thought insanity was essentially a result of over-agitation, the cure for which lay in calmness and control.
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