A Charles II oyster-veneered olivewood, marquetry and embroidered raised work cabinet
Lot 10
A Charles II oyster-veneered olivewood, marquetry and embroidered raised work cabinet on a later stand
Sold for £73,250 (US$ 123,613) inc. premium
Auction Details
A Charles II oyster-veneered olivewood, marquetry and embroidered raised work cabinet A Charles II oyster-veneered olivewood, marquetry and embroidered raised work cabinet A Charles II oyster-veneered olivewood, marquetry and embroidered raised work cabinet A Charles II oyster-veneered olivewood, marquetry and embroidered raised work cabinet A Charles II oyster-veneered olivewood, marquetry and embroidered raised work cabinet A Charles II oyster-veneered olivewood, marquetry and embroidered raised work cabinet A Charles II oyster-veneered olivewood, marquetry and embroidered raised work cabinet A Charles II oyster-veneered olivewood, marquetry and embroidered raised work cabinet
Lot Details
A Charles II oyster-veneered olivewood, marquetry and embroidered raised work cabinet on a later stand
The rising top with strapwork marquetry revealing an embroidered raised work panel worked with appliqué metal purl, depicting a scene of King Herod being presented with the head of John the Baptist, by Salome above a fitted interior lined with pink silk within concave sides, the pair of doors with conforming strapwork enclosing a further pair of raised work and metal purl panels portraying Charles II and Catherine of Braganza, the interior with an arrangement of seven similarly worked drawer panels including mythological episodes from 'Narcissus and Echo' and 'The Rape of Europa', together with a group of figures possibly representing the four seasons all headed by a late 16th century armorial panel with the Haynes family arms with a small door panel below illustrating an Old Testament scene from the 'Finding of Moses', the door opening onto a mirror panels, columns and secret compartments, the finely textile panels incorporating cotton picot edged linen collars and gloves, a velvet glove and red beads and seed pearls together with embroidered coloured silk detailing including coral; leafy garlands of applied looped silk thread covered strips surrounded by similarly worked white flowers and applied metal devices featuring a crown and a staff, each panel with a cream satin ground, on a stand with one long drawer above later spiral-turned legs and waved stretchers with turned feet, 78cm wide, 44cm deep, 131cm high (30.5" wide, 17" deep, 51.5" high).

Footnotes

  • Provenance:

    Almost certainly made for either a son or grandson of John Haynes, first Governor of the Colony of Connecticut (d.1654), for Copford Hall, Essex.
    Thence by descent through the Haynes family until sold, 'The Property of William Haynes Esq., Gloucester House, London, Christie's, London, 1 July 1909, lot 151.
    Purchased by Mr Cecil Partridge, King Street, St. James's, London.
    Mrs H. Stanford Mountain, Groombridge Place, Kent and by descent until sold Sotheby's London, 20 November 2007, lot 153 (£90,500).

    Literature:

    'A Stump-Work Cabinet', Country Life 1 April 1922, p.1x.
    P. Macquoid and R. Edwards, The Dictionary of English Furniture, 1954 rev. ed., 3 vols., Vol. 1, p. 164, fig. 5.
    A. Oswald, 'Groombridge Place, Kent - III, The Home of Mr S.W. Mountain', Country Life, 29 December 1955, pp. 1524-1526, figs. 2,4,7 & 8.
    O. Hill & J. Cornforth, English Country Houses, Caroline 1625-1685, London 1966, p. 46. figs. 42 & 43.
    G. Jackson-Stops (ed.), The Treasure Houses of Britain, Five Hundred Years of Private Patronage and Art Collecting, New Haven, 1985, pp. 150-151, no. 75.
    D. Linley, Extraordinary Furniture, London, 1996, pp. 148-149.
    L. Synge, Art of Embroidery, History of Style and Technique, The Royal School of Needlework, London, 2001, p. 228. fig. 219.

    Exhibited:

    The National Gallery, Washington D.C., 'The Treasure Houses of Britain, Five Hundred Years of Patronage and Art Collections', 1985, no. 75.

    John Haynes, a wealthy man of Puritan parentage, was born the son of John and Mary Haynes of Essex, England in 1594. Some years after his wife Mary Thornton's death in 1624, John Haynes junior embarked on a voyage aboard the ship Griffin accompanied by Thomas Hooker and Cotton Mather to America which took him to his destination Massachusetts Bay on 3rd September 1633. He adopted a political role in this pioneering colony and was elected Assistant to the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony the following year. He was promoted to Governor in 1635 and was forced to contend with some religious and political upheaval arising from the pressures of increased immigration on the food supply. This situation persuaded him to support the plan of his fellow colonist John Hooker to establish a break-away group of settlers in Connecticut in 1636. Here he was equally active in the politics of the Colony, and was elected to the position of Governor eight times. Haynes returned his former Colony in an attempt to form an alliance to fight the Indians during the Pequot War (1636-1638). At the end of the war he signed a treaty between the Connecticut Colony, the Narragansett's and the Mohgegans.

    Haynes's two sons, Hezekiah and his older brother Robert returned to England to respectively serve in Cromwell's and the King's armies. Hezekiah distinguished himself by his appointment to Major of the Horse in the New Model Army, before being promoted to Major-General for Essex, Cambridgeshire, the Isle of Ely, Norfolk and Suffolk. He was also instrumental in enforcing the decimation tax on the Royalists in his region which ironically applied to his elder brother's inheritance of the family estate at Copford Hall. After Thomas Cromwell's death Hezekiah allied himself to Fleetwood and Lambert in opposing Richard Cromwell succeeding his father and in forcibly closing Parliament. In November 1660, he was arrested and imprisoned for eighteen months on suspicion of plotting against the restored monarchy. He returned to Essex on his release, where he died in 1663.

    During the late 17th century, embroidery was predominantly a domestic pursuit adopted by women of fashionable society including those in aristocratic circles such as Bess of Hardwick. Practitioners of this art form honed their skills initially by producing samplers before attempting more complex pieces which were often applied to clothing or other luxury items. Typically the subject matter was political, pastoral or religious and included popular figures such as Charles I, Charles II and Henrietta Maria or Catherine of Braganza. Subjects from the Old Testament denoted Protestant allegiance and those from the New Testament. Popular stories representing this faith were those from the life of Solomon and the Queen of Sheba as well as Ahasuerus and Esher. Other recurring pastoral and literary themes included episodes from Ovid's mythological and metamorphoses. For a survey of makers, collectors, sources and embroidery techniques including illustrations of related work, see Mary M. Brooks, English Embroideries of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, in the collection of the Ashmolean Museum, London, 2004.

    One of the most popular early design sources was a pattern book Les Singuliers et Nouveaux Pourtaicts, which was published by Federico Vinciolo in many editions between 1587 and 1623. Towards the end of the 17th century print sellers supplied patterns and merchants converted these to satin panels marked out with designs to be embellished by the embroiderer. The finished article could then be returned to the merchant to be made up into a range of individualised items such as caskets and mirrors (See Lanto Synge, Art of Embroidery, History of Style and Technique, The Royal School of Needlework, London 2001, pp. 110-159, pp. 131-143, pp. 134-135 and p. 228, fig. 219 illustrating the present lot).

    Foremost of the English pattern book and print sellers was John Stent (born c. 1615-1617) who published in excess of 218 plates covering natural history subjects for use by teachers, embroiderers and artists. His publications included a three part volume, A Book of Flowers Beasts, Birds and Fruits, in three parts, 20 leaves in each l'art (see Alexander Globe, Peter Stent London Bookseller Circa 1642-1665, 1985). Stent's patterns also featured the work of other engravers including Thomas Johnson, Jacob Hoefnagel, Wenceslaus Hollar, John Dunstall and John Payne and Johan Sibmacher (For reproductions from Stenton's Third Booke of Flowers Fruits, Beastes, Birds and Flies, drawn with additions by John Dunstall, 1661, see Cora Ginsburg, A Book of Flowers, Fruits, Beasts, Birds and Flies, 17th century patterns for embroiderers, Curious Works Press, USA, 1995). Characteristic Patterns for running bands of 17th English embroidery from Richard Shorleyker's, A Scholehouse for the Needle 1632 is illustrated in Michael Snodin and John Styles, Design and the Decorative Arts, Tudor and Stuart Britain 1500-1714, Victorian and Albert Museum Publications, London, 2004, p. 138, pl. 24.

    Examples of related embroidery dating from the same period and incorporating comparable techniques, featuring a wreath and applied coloured metal-purl work, include two mirror surrounds, sold 'Important Needlework collected by the late Sir Frederick Richmond Bt., Christie's London, 14 June 2001, lots 28 and 29.
Auction information

This auction is now finished. If you are interested in consigning in future auctions, please contact the specialist department. If you have queries about lots purchased in this auction, please contact customer services.

Buyers' Obligations

ALL BIDDERS MUST AGREE THAT THEY HAVE READ AND UNDERSTOOD BONHAMS' CONDITIONS OF SALE AND AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THEM, AND AGREE TO PAY THE BUYER'S PREMIUM AND ANY OTHER CHARGES MENTIONED IN THE NOTICE TO BIDDERS. THIS AFFECTS THE BIDDERS LEGAL RIGHTS.

If you have any complaints or questions about the Conditions of Sale, please contact your nearest customer services team.

Buyers' Premium and Charges

For all Sales categories excluding Wine, Coins & Medals and Motor Cars and Motorcycles:

Buyer's Premium Rates
25% on the first £50,000 of the Hammer Price
20% from £50,001 to £1,000,000 the Hammer Price
12% from £1,000,001 of the Hammer Price

VAT at the current rate of 20% will be added to the Buyer's Premium and charges excluding Artists Resale Right.

Payment Notices

Payment in advance: by cash, check with banker's card, credit card, bank draft or traveler's cheque.

Payment at collection: by credit or debit card.

Credit card charges: a surcharge of 2% is applicable when using Mastercard, Visa and overseas debit cards.

Shipping Notices

For information and estimates on domestic and international shipping as well as export licenses please contact Bonhams Shipping Department.

Contacts
  1. Fine Furniture (UK)
    Auction Administration - English Furniture and Works of Art
    Bonhams
    Work
  2. Jackie Brown
    Auction Administration - English Furniture and Works of Art
    Bonhams
    Work
    101 New Bond Street
    London, United Kingdom W1S 1SR
    Work +44 20 7468 8204
    FaxFax: +44 20 7468 8208
  3. Fergus Lyons
    Specialist - English Furniture and Works of Art
    Bonhams
    Work
    101 New Bond Street
    London, United Kingdom W1S 1SR
    Work +44 20 7468 8221
  4. Guy Savill
    Specialist - English Furniture and Works of Art
    Bonhams
    Work
    101 New Bond Street
    London, United Kingdom W1S 1SR
    Work +44 20 8963 2848
    FaxFax: +44 20 8963 2807
  5. Sally Stratton
    Specialist - English Furniture and Works of Art
    Bonhams
    Work
    101 New Bond Street
    London, United Kingdom W1S 1SR
    Work +44 20 8963 2847
    FaxFax: +44 20 8963 2807