A fine gilt and black lacquered rectangular low display table, kang Probably late 18th century, possibly Imperial
Lot 322W
A fine gilt and black lacquered rectangular low display table, kang
Probably late 18th century, possibly Imperial
Sold for £37,250 (US$ 62,573) inc. premium
Auction Details
A fine gilt and black lacquered rectangular low display table, kang Probably late 18th century, possibly Imperial
Lot Details
A fine gilt and black lacquered rectangular low display table, kang
Probably late 18th century, possibly Imperial
The top painted in gilt on black lacquer with a central medallion composed of four lotus blossoms surrounded by four cartouches formed from scrolling and interlocking ruyi-heads each containing a further blossom, surrounded by four bats enclosed by further ruyi-head cartouches and stylised blossoms, all surrounded by sixteen bats in flight, with a border of square interlocking scrolls and ruyi-head, enclosed on three sides only by an outer border of elongated floral scroll medallions flanked by bats, on each of the sides containing reticulated panels edged in gilt, the apron carved on each side and decorated with scrolls and flowers, raised on four very unusually elaborate acanthus-carved curving legs terminating in scrolls.
128cm x 98cm x 39cm (50½in x 38½in x 15½in)

Footnotes

  • 或十八世紀晚期,或御製 黑漆描金蓮蝠紋炕桌

    The opulent and vibrant technique of gilt decoration applied in contrast to a black lacquer ground was used to great effect in the Qing Imperial Court for a variety of Imperial furniture, from thrones to beds, stands, stools, seats, cabinets, screens, chairs and tables as demonstrated in the present lot. This technique can be seen on furniture still in situ in the Forbidden City in places such as the Yucuixuan and the Cui Yun Guan (Hall of Green Cloud). For a chair with a related design of bats and floral scrolls, see The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum: Furniture of the Ming and Qing Dynasties (II), Hong Kong, 2002, pl.61. The feet are remarkably elaborate and, formed as acanthus leaves, do have a markedly Western feel in their design. The fact that the outer border on the top is deliberately left open on one side suggests that this may in fact have been used as a display stand as well.

    For other examples from the Qing Court Collection, see ibid, pls.4, 20, 28, 34, 49, 57, 61, 62, 76, 85, 89, 159, 167, 229, and 234.
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