18th Century style inkstand French
Lot 52
OF BELGIUM ROYAL INTEREST; A Belgium silver-gilt and silver presentation rectangular inkstand by Althenloh, Brusselles, circa 1918
Sold for £5,000 (US$ 8,404) inc. premium
Auction Details
The Chester Sale Chester
4 Sep 2012 11:00 BST

Auction 19901
18th Century style inkstand French 18th Century style inkstand French 18th Century style inkstand French
Lot Details
OF BELGIUM ROYAL INTEREST; A Belgium silver-gilt and silver presentation rectangular inkstand
by Althenloh, Brusselles, circa 1918
The shaped rectangular base with central pen tray and inscription, with an applied floral border, mounted with a silver-gilt central stamp box, the hinged cover with a crown finial, fitted with a stamp tray and with crown finial, flanked by two floral engraved inkwells with integral candle branches, raised on a scroll base, the underside with inscription, 35 x 28cm, weight 81.5oz.

Footnotes

  • The tray inscribed "1914-1918, Un pays qui se defend, s'impose, au respect de tous, ce pays neperit pas!"

    This translates to "1914-1918, A country that defends, imposes itself, in respect of all, this country doesn't perish."

    The underside inscribed "Au roi Albert, en commemoration de son retour triumphal dans, sa capitale le 22/11/1918, ses orfevres" with a signature.

    This translates to "King Albert, in commemoration of his triumphal return to his capital, on 22/11/1918, by his goldsmiths"

    Albert I (1875-1934) was King of the Belgians throughout the war, organising resistance to German occupation of much of Belgium.

    He came to the throne in 1909, succeeding his uncle, Leopold II.

    Belgium occupied the only open tract of land between France and Germany, thus its stance as a neutral power was key to the balance of power in pre-war Europe.

    Belgium's neutrality not withstanding, Germany issued an ultimatum on 2 August 1914, demanding that Belgium allow German forces access to its territory so that Germany could gain ready access to French borders. Albert I resisted the demand and took personal charge of his forces.

    Germany therefore invaded Belgium on 4 August 1914, quickly overrunning the country's small army (consisting of 43,000 men in 1914, with 115,000 reserve troops) and forcing Albert I to move the Belgian government to Le Havre from where he continued to govern his nation (although he himself continued to live in Belgium, firstly in De Panne and then in Kasteel De Moeren).

    On 22 November 1918, Albert I triumphantly re-entered Brussels having successfully commanded the Belgian army in the autumn 1918 Courtrai offensive.

    Albert I died in a climbing accident in 1934, and was succeeded by his son, Leopold III.
Activities
Contacts
  1. Andrew Spicer
    Specialist - Silver
    Bonhams
    Work
    New House
    Chester, CH3 5TD
    United Kingdom
    Work +44 1244 353 112
    FaxFax: +44 1244 340 028