[SCHOENER, JOHANN. 1477-1547. Luculentissima quaedam terrae totius descriptio. Nuremberg: Johannes Stuchs, 1515.]<BR />
Lot 7
[SCHOENER, JOHANN. 1477-1547. Luculentissima quaedam terrae totius descriptio. Nuremberg: Johannes Stuchs, 1515.]
US$ 25,000 - 35,000
£15,000 - 21,000
Auction Details
[SCHOENER, JOHANN. 1477-1547. Luculentissima quaedam terrae totius descriptio. Nuremberg: Johannes Stuchs, 1515.]<BR />
Lot Details
[SCHOENER, JOHANN. 1477-1547.
Luculentissima quaedam terrae totius descriptio. Nuremberg: Johannes Stuchs, 1515.]
a8 (a1 in facsimile) b6 A8 (A1 the woodcut of the globe in facsimile) B8 C-G4 H-K8 L6. Woodcut circular map of eastern hemisphere, ornamental woodcut initials, tables, sidenotes. Small 4to (200 x 140 mm). Modern calf, titles stamped in gilt to spine. Lacking title leaf and "Orbis Typus" woodcut, with both supplied in facsimile. Provenance: Harrison D Horblit (bookplate)

SCHOENER'S IMPORTANT AND RARE WORK PUBLISHED TO ACCOMPANY HIS FIRST GLOBE IN 1515 AND INCLUDING THE FIRST PRINTED DESCRIPTION OF AMERICA. THE HORBLIT COPY. On his important globe of 1515 Schoener followed Martin Waldseemüller's map of 1507 in assigning the name "America" to the lands recently explored by Amerigo Vespucci (the east coast of present day South America), and in identifying those lands as distinct from the continent of Asia. He also appears to depict the Magellan Strait a full seven years before Magellan explored the area. This treatise is also the first to print coordinates of latitude and longitude for locations in the New World. In chapter XI, "De America quarta orbis."ff60-82, he describes the new 4th continent as Novus mundus (New World) and accords its discovery to Amerigo Vespucci in 1497. The descriptions include the West Indies and Brazil, and concludes "nunc in modum terra quadripartita cognoscit &fut tres tres primae pts continantes est terra firma: Sed quarta est insula: quia omni quaque mari circumdata conipicitur."

A pioneer globe maker, Schoener was also the owner of the sole surviving example of Waldseemüller's world map of 1507 and the Carta Marina 1510, both now in the collection of the Library of Congress. Alden 18; Church 37; Coote & Stevens 2; Harrisse BAV 80; Mapping the World 41; Sabin 77804.
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