Property of a deceased's estate,1957 Scott 596cc Flying Squirrel Frame no. S1051 Engine no. DPY5436
Lot 261
Property of a deceased's estate,1957 Scott 596cc Flying Squirrel
Registration no. UOP 291 Frame no. S1051 Engine no. DPY5436
Sold for £5,175 (US$ 6,532) inc. premium

Lot Details
Property of a deceased's estate,1957 Scott 596cc Flying Squirrel Frame no. S1051 Engine no. DPY5436 Property of a deceased's estate,1957 Scott 596cc Flying Squirrel Frame no. S1051 Engine no. DPY5436 Property of a deceased's estate,1957 Scott 596cc Flying Squirrel Frame no. S1051 Engine no. DPY5436 Property of a deceased's estate,1957 Scott 596cc Flying Squirrel Frame no. S1051 Engine no. DPY5436 Property of a deceased's estate,1957 Scott 596cc Flying Squirrel Frame no. S1051 Engine no. DPY5436 Property of a deceased's estate,1957 Scott 596cc Flying Squirrel Frame no. S1051 Engine no. DPY5436
Property of a deceased's estate
1957 Scott 596cc Flying Squirrel
Registration no. UOP 291
Frame no. S1051
Engine no. DPY5436
Bradford-born Alfred Angas Scott's experiments with two-stroke motorcycle engines began in the closing years of the nineteenth century. The first complete Scott motorcycle followed in 1908, its twin-cylinder engine, two-speed foot-change gear and all-chain drive marking it out as an exceptionally advanced design for its day. Light weight, ample power and sure-footed handling thanks to a low centre of gravity were Scott virtues right from the outset. Like its major rivals, Scott was well aware of the publicity value of racing and the allure of models with a TT connection, so the adoption of an optional full-frame tank, like that of the works racers, for the new Flying Squirrel was not surprising. Launched at the Olympia Show in 1925, the 'Flyer' came in 498cc and 596cc capacities, the latter being the most expensive machine in the range. Subsequent models also benefited from the racing programme, gaining the duplex frame and bigger brakes (first seen on the works bikes in 1926) and the magneto-platform Pilgrim oil pump adopted for the 1927 TT machines.

Alfred Scott's original engine layout would survive until production petered out in the late 1960s, by which time the company had changed hands and relocated from Shipley to Birmingham. Scott's acquisition by Matt Holder's Aerco Jig & Tool Company in 1950 brought with it a number of long-awaited improvements, including a new duplex frame with rear suspension and improved brakes, though customers had to wait until 1956 to buy one of these new 'Birmingham' Scotts. In the meantime, old-style Flying Squirrels that had been completed at Shipley before the company's sale were the only models on offer.

It is believed that this Birmingham-built Flying Squirrel was purchased in 2003 having already been restored to a good standard by a previous owner. Noteworthy features include alternator electrics (introduced for 1958), an Amal Concentric carburettor, Squirrel mascot, matching Smiths speedometer and clock, and 'Shipley Scott' transfers. Accompanying documentation consists of the original buff logbook (part missing) and six expired MoT certificates (most recent April 2003). Offered with V5C, 'UOP 291' has not been used or run since acquisition in 2003 and will therefore require re-commissioning and the customary safety checks before returning to the road.

Saleroom notices

  • The frame number is M1051 and not as previously catalogued.
Activities
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    Bonhams
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