A rare and important microscope camera combination observer, by Le Chatelier Ph. Pellin, Paris,
Lot 134*
A rare and important microscope camera combination observer, by Le Chatelier Ph. Pellin, Paris,
£5,000 - 8,000
US$ 8,400 - 13,000
Lot Details
A rare and important microscope camera combination observer, by Le Chatelier Ph. Pellin, Paris,
circa 1885, No. 73,
the object table with rotating radial, above x and y plateau for fine adjustment, reading scales beside knurled controls, Zeiss lens on the main vertical-cut prism case housing of polished and lacquered brass with ninety-degree position knob below, six-mask rotating dial to light source tube opposite the dry-plate camera tube funnel terminating with dark box chamber, three slides for the chamber including diffuser, lens and paper-box, horizontal monocular finely engraved with maker's signature, on circular black finished tripod base with brass point adjustable feet, with the original accessory case, present now with just the three dark box chamber slides, Zeiss lens, three oblong prism blocks, and a small glass square - 14in. (36cm) long, the case 10.3/4in. (27cm) wide

Footnotes

  • A very early piece designed to incorporate both microscope and camera capabilities, in addition to an opalescent viewing screen for multiple on-sight observations. Although not totally complete, it does show the combination theory did work very well. Yet one example is to be found complete, with usually the object table or camera attachment missing.

    The object table is arranged just as a standard microscope, but instead of the main light source for capturing the image on light-sensitive paper being just sunlight from a close-range concave mirror, the use of an arc lamp was necessary. Its bright white direct light was perfect for this application and made the best use of the newest technology available at the time. The design of this piece was based around its combination use with an arc lamp (shown as an example in the illustration).

    Henry Louis Chatelier (1850-1936) was an innovative French gentleman. His obsession with observing properties of metals and minerals, led him to being approached by the team lead by Gustave Eiffel during the planning of the Eiffel tower in Paris, opened in 1889. His newest research ensured Eiffel's planners to use the correct type of quality steel and a minimum number of rivets per cluster for the girders during construction.
    Chatelier's name appears with the 71 other names on the entrance plaque honouring key people who assisted in the creation of the famous Paris landmark.
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  1. Jon Baddeley
    Specialist - Scientific Instruments
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