An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860
Lot 3
An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860
Sold for HK$ 156,000 (US$ 20,125) inc. premium

Lot Details
An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860 An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle Probably Imperial, 1750–1860
An inscribed aquamarine snuff bottle
Probably Imperial, 1750–1860
5.64cm high.

Footnotes

  • Treasury 3, no. 411

    海藍寶雕蟠螭篆銘鼻煙壺
    大概為御製品,1750-1860

    The Pure Heart Aquamarine

    Aquamarine; well hollowed, with a flat lip and irregular, flat foot, and carved in the form of a vessel with a single loop-and-ring handle beneath which a chi dragon coils, one end of its bifid tail curled under the ring, the other main side carved with an inscription in seal script, Xinji shuangqing ('Heart and deeds both pure')
    Probably imperial, 1750–1860
    Height: 5.64 cm
    Mouth/lip: 0.4/1.0 cm
    Stopper: garnet; gilt-silver collar

    Condition: indentation on front main side near foot that is probably original to remove flaws but could conceivable be a subsequent chip ground out; two tiny adjacent chips on the inner lip; tiny chip on the simulated ring hanging from the loop on the main side with the chi dragon. General relative condition: very good

    Provenance:
    Kaynes-Klitz Collection
    Sotheby's, Hong Kong, 3 November 1994, lot 839

    Published:
    Treasury 3, no. 411

    Commentary
    There are compelling reasons to believe that this may have been an imperial bottle, possibly made at the court, although precious stones were also carved for the court at Suzhou and Yangzhou. Apart from the chi dragon, which is an established courtly design of the Qing dynasty and particularly of the eighteenth century (see discussion under Treasury 1, no. 99), the form here refers to the ancient bronze culture, so much a part of decorative inspiration at the palace.

    This elongated oval form is not a bronze form; it is a variation on the meiping ('prunus blossom vase') so popular at court as a snuff-bottle form (see discussion under Treasury 1, no. 92). Added to this, however, is a loop and simulated loose-ring handle of the type found on ancient bronze vessels and reproduced on enormous numbers of Qing courtly arts, including a large number of jade vessels of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Yet one more indication of a palace source is the deep foot. The walls are unusually thinly hollowed for a precious stone bottle, but there is a deliberately deep foot. Although this may have been designed to present some of the original depth of colour, which it does admirably, it is probably simply a stylistic quirk and one we have established as being courtly, and typical of the palace workshops (see under Treasury 1, no. 75).

    The conception is delightful, as is the execution. The lovely, even-coloured material, the colour and purity of which is best seen in the deeper foot area, has been carved with a lively chi dragon that dives down the bottle but has its head turned to look back up towards the neck. One end of its bifid tail curls beneath the rounded rectangular ring that hangs from the single loop-handle in an amusing touch that suggests that the beast is hooked onto it. On the other side, the inscription is superbly carved in relief seal script with considerable calligraphic grace and complete confidence. The wording comes from a poem by Du Fu, but it was and still is a common short text for the calligrapher.

    清心海藍寶石

    海藍寶石;掏膛完整,平唇,不規則的平面底;一正面雕一個簡化的獸首啣環耳,其下有蟠螭,其對裂的尾巴一半隱蔽在環耳後邊,另一正面陽刻"心跡雙清"篆銘
    大概為御製品, 1750~1860年
    高:5.64 厘米
    口經/唇經:0.4/1.0 厘米
    蓋:石榴石;描金銀座

    狀態敘述:
    一正面近底有凹口,大概是原來磨除瑕疵的地方,但也可能是後來磨除非缺口 之處;唇內有一雙小缺口,環耳也呈微小的缺口。 總體的相對狀況: 相當好

    來源:
    Kaynes-Klitz 珍藏
    蘇富比,香港,1994年11月3日,拍賣品號839

    文獻:
    Treasury 3, 編號411

    說明:
    本壺的螭紋、形式、深入底、獸啣環耳等都是宮廷作坊的特徵,詳細請參閱本壺的英文說明。
Auction information

This auction is now finished. If you are interested in consigning in future auctions, please contact the specialist department. If you have queries about lots purchased in this auction, please contact customer services.

Buyers' Obligations

ALL BIDDERS MUST AGREE THAT THEY HAVE READ AND UNDERSTOOD BONHAMS' CONDITIONS OF SALE AND AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THEM, AND AGREE TO PAY THE BUYER'S PREMIUM AND ANY OTHER CHARGES MENTIONED IN THE NOTICE TO BIDDERS. THIS AFFECTS THE BIDDERS LEGAL RIGHTS.

If you have any complaints or questions about the Conditions of Sale, please contact your nearest customer services team.

Buyers' Premium and Charges

For all Sales categories excluding Wine:

Buyer's Premium Rates
25% on the first HKD800,000 of the Hammer Price
20% from HKD800,001 to HKD1,000,000 of the Hammer Price
12% on the excess over HKD1,000,000 of the Hammer Price.

Shipping Notices

For information and estimates on domestic and international shipping as well as export licences please contact Bonhams Shipping Department.

Contacts
  1. Daniel Lam
    Specialist - Whisky
    Bonhams
    Work
    Suite 2001, One Pacific Place
    Hong Kong
    Work +852 3607 0004
    FaxFax: +852 2918 4320
Similar Items