English School, circa 1575 A Judge, probably Sir John Clench (c.1535–1607), wearing miniver lined crimson cloak closed at his right shoulder, white fur tippet, small ruff, white coif and black felt cap
Lot 1
English School
circa 1575
A Judge, probably Sir John Clench (c.1535–1607), wearing miniver lined crimson cloak closed at his right shoulder, white fur tippet, small ruff, white coif and black felt cap
£3,000 - 5,000
US$ 5,000 - 8,400
Lot Details
English School, circa 1575
A Judge, probably Sir John Clench (c.1535–1607), wearing miniver lined crimson cloak closed at his right shoulder, white fur tippet, small ruff, white coif and black felt cap.
Oil on prepared card, gilt-metal frame.
Circular, 40mm (1 9/16in) dia.
Provenance: Robert Bayne-Powell
Purchased in 1973
Exhibited: Portrait Miniatures from the Merchiston Collection, Scottish National Portrait Gallery, 23 September – 11 December 2005, no.1
Literature: Stephen Lloyd, Exhibition Catalogue, 2005, p.56

Footnotes

  • Clench was admitted to Lincoln's Inn in 1556, called to the bar in 1563, and served as reader of Furnival's Inn for three years 1566-1569; these readings were on the Statutes of Wills and the statute De conjunctim feoffatis. In 1570 he was called to the bench of Lincoln's Inn, where he delivered a reading in 1574 and was treasurer 1578-1579. He became recorder of Ipswich in 1575. In 1580 he was created serjeant-at-law, his patrons at the ceremony being the Earl of Oxford, Lord Wentworth, and Sir William Cordell. A year later, he was appointed one of the barons of the exchequer, and in 1584 he was translated to the Queen's bench.

    He married Katherine, daughter of Thomas Almot, by whom he had five sons and eight daughters. It was said that Elizabeth I referred to him as 'her good judge', but he was never knighted. By 1602, being 'so decrepit that he could not well travel outside his country', he was discharged from attendance at court. He was buried at Holbrook, Suffolk, where there is a large monument bearing his effigy in robes.

    The present lot bears a close resemblance to a quarter-length etching of Clench by Wenceslas Hollar dated 1664 for Dugdale's Origines juridiciales. (See National Portrait Gallery, London, D25377)
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