1937 Riley 1½-Litre Kestrel Sprite Special Sports Saloon  Chassis no. SS27K6131 Engine no. SSK6131
Lot 409
1937 Riley 1½-Litre Kestrel Sprite Special Sports Saloon Chassis no. SS27K6131 Engine no. SSK6131
Sold for £7,820 (US$ 13,131) inc. premium
Lot Details
1937 Riley 1½-Litre Kestrel Sprite Special Sports Saloon
Registration no. DKM 818
Chassis no. SS27K6131
Engine no. SSK6131

Footnotes

  • Introduced in 1926, Percy Riley’s 9hp, 1,087cc twin-camshaft four was an outstanding engine design by any standards, various versions powering Rileys until 1957. Clothed in stylish bodywork by Stanley Riley, the Coventry marque’s pre-war offerings were among the world’s finest small-capacity sporting cars. Riley’s proven twin-camshaft layout was retained for the new Hugh Rose-designed 1½-litre four introduced in 1935. The Falcon saloon made its debut on this new 12hp chassis, which was also available with the familiar Kestrel saloon and Lynx tourer coachwork. The following year the range was augmented by the Sprite two-seater sports and three more saloons: the Adelphi and six-light Kestrel on the 112.5” long-wheelbase chassis and the shorter-wheelbase (106”) all-steel Merlin. In Standard trim the 1½-litre 12/4 engine produced 45/46bhp with single Zenith carburettor. The Special Series came with twin SUs and 52bhp while at the top of the range was the 59/61bhp Sprite specification engine that added £48 to the car’s purchase price. In its ‘TT’ guise the new Sprite more than upheld Riley’s sporting traditions, winning the Ulster Tourist Trophy in both 1935 and 1936 with the legendary Freddie Dixon at the wheel while there were numerous privateer successes at Brooklands and elsewhere.
    First owned by one Lincoln Vincent Williams of Devises, Wiltshire, ‘DKM 818’ was acquired by Barry Burnett (its second owner) in 1983 and is listed in David G Styles’ definitive book on Riley, As old as the Industry. Offered for restoration, the car comes with Swansea V5 and is sold strictly as viewed. No reserve.
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