An oak caqueteuse chair, probably coastal Fife, first half 17th century
Lot 960
An oak caqueteuse chair, probably coastal Fife, first half 17th century
Sold for £20,400 (US$ 34,288) inc. premium
Auction Details
Scottish Sale Edinburgh
20 Aug 2009 11:00 BST

Auction 17232
An oak caqueteuse chair, probably coastal Fife, first half 17th century An oak caqueteuse chair, probably coastal Fife, first half 17th century An oak caqueteuse chair, probably coastal Fife, first half 17th century
Lot Details
An oak caqueteuse chair, probably coastal Fife, first half 17th century
The panel back with undulating top-rail carved with roundels and stylised leaves flanked by uprights carved with stylised palmettes enclosing two panels depicting lunettes and fleur-de-lys within out-swept arms and solid seat with moulded edge, the seat rail chip carved with repeating 'S' motif on ring turned baluster shaped legs united by stretchers 70cm wide103cm high, (27.5" wide40.5" high)

Footnotes

  • Provenance Earlshall, Leuchars Fife

    Scotland’s first furniture historian, John Small, first recognised the Fife ‘short caqueteuse’ chair form in his Ancient and Modern Furniture, 1883, and this has subsequently been corroborated by the discovery of provenanced examples from the north east of the Kingdom (Falkland, Balmerino and St Monans: see David Jones, The Vernacular Chair in Fife, 1996). They have a characteristic vocabulary of carved motifs including stiff palmettes and fleshy rosettes. Some have cresting rails with exaggerated inward-pointing scrolls put down on a central plinth. The double back panel is found principally on more important and ceremonial caqueteuse chairs.
    W R Mackenzie of Earlshall, Fife, furnished the hall of his sixteenth century tower house (restored and re-modelled by R S Lorimer, 1892) with some good examples of the type.
    The collection is now dispersed. (see illustration)
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