A rare engraved opaque-twist Privateer wine glass circa 1757
Lot 98
A rare engraved opaque-twist Privateer wine glass circa 1757
Sold for £7,800 (US$ 12,977) inc. premium
Lot Details
A rare engraved opaque-twist Privateer wine glass
circa 1757
The slightly waisted bucket bowl decorated with a ship portrait, inscribed above Success to the Famous TYGER Privateer, set on a double cable spiral stem and conical foot, 19.3cm high, 336 in white to the foot (minor chips to the rim and foot)

Footnotes

  • Provenance: The Hamilton-Clements Collection, Sotheby's, 15 May 1930, lot 71, purchased by Cecil Davis

    Illustrated by Francis Buckley in the Oldham Chronicle, 23 April 1927. A ship of 560 tons, mounted with 30 guns and with a crew of 300 men, she was the only privateer to earn the contemporary title of 'famous'. Her exploits are recorded both in the Daily Advertiser and the London Chronicle. See the similar privateer wine glass, from the James Hall Collection, sold in these Rooms, 17 December 2008, lot 146, inscribed 'Succefs to the Enterppize'(sic), which was probably engraved by the same hand.

    E.B.Haynes states that the present lot is the earliest of this type so far known ('A Naval Array. Part 1', Apollo, March 1940, p.76). She was built by the French. During the war of the Austrian Succession she was taken by HMS Falkland. In October 1747, under the command of Capt. James Seix, she took the Nuestra Senora Vegonia, a Spanish privateer credited with the capture of 120 British vessels. The next year, 1748, was quite as successful, with captures including the Santa Theresa, thought to be worth some £40,000. The Tyger was rebuilt in Bristol in 1749 and again commissioned on the outbreak of the Seven Years' War in 1756 under the command of Capt. Peter Griffin. In August the French ships Nestor and Conte de Noailles were captured. A further Declaration was made on 5 July 1757, this time by Capt. John Neilson. In the following February Tyger took a 12-gun French privateer, but after a two-hour engagement was soon after herself captured by the French man-of-war Rose. She was taken into Malta, reappearing on 30 January 1762, now under the command of de Fabry, who sustained a three-hour action with HMS Danae.. On 4 April 1762, she was taken by the King George privateer and the following February was put up for sale thus ending her career as a privateer.

Saleroom notices

  • Please note that this glass is also illustrated by W.A.Thorpe, English & Irish Glass, (1927), fig.57
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