A rare art deco, Egyptian revival, diamond, turquoise and onyx sphinx brooch, by Cartier,
Lot 105
A rare art deco, Egyptian revival, diamond, turquoise and onyx sphinx brooch, by Cartier,
Sold for £22,800 (US$ 38,299) inc. premium
Auction Details
Lot Details
A rare art deco, Egyptian revival, diamond, turquoise and onyx sphinx brooch, by Cartier, circa 1925
The Egyptian turquoise-blue glazed-composition sphinx, with Nubian four-stranded hairstyle, Third Intermediate Period 1069-702 BC, seated on a lotus flower capital decorated with onyx and turquoise and single-cut diamonds, with a circular black enamel neck rivet, mounted in gold and platinum, signed Cartier Paris Made in France and numbered, French assay mark, length 4.5cm.

Footnotes

  • In 1922, the discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen by Howard Carter sparked a worldwide media frenzy. The discovery may not have offered much in the way of written historical documentation but its visual impact was far reaching and influenced fashion, luxury accessories, architecture, furniture and interior design. In 1923, Pierre Cartier predicted “the discovery will bring sweeping changes in the fashion in jewellery”. Unlike many jewellers working in the Egyptian taste, Cartier relied on major Egyptian source books such as Description de l’Egypte and Owen Jones’ Grammar of Ornament when designing their jewels. Authentic Egyptian antiquities, often collected by Louis Cartier from Parisian dealers, were used as the centrepieces of their jewels in the Tutankhamen taste. The fashionable woman in Paris, London or New York might wear such creations to offset her Hathor wrap, Luxor gown or Carnarvon frock. Thus the influence of ancient Egyptian art coupled with the innovative culture of art deco allowed Cartier to create some of their most visually striking, original and interesting jewels.

    Cf: Benton, Charlotte (ed), `Art Deco 1910-1939`, V&A London, 2003
    Rudoe, Judy, `Cartier 1900-1939`, British Museum London, 1997, pp 135-156
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