(n/a) Thomas Flatman (British, 1637-1688) William Russell, Lord Russell (1639-1683), wearing ochre coloured cloak, lace jabot and white chemise, his hair curled and worn long
Lot 75*
(n/a) Thomas Flatman
(British, 1637-1688)
William Russell, Lord Russell (1639-1683), wearing ochre coloured cloak, lace jabot and white chemise, his hair curled and worn long
Sold for £5,400 (US$ 9,076) inc. premium
Lot Details
(n/a) Thomas Flatman (British, 1637-1688)
William Russell, Lord Russell (1639-1683), wearing ochre coloured cloak, lace jabot and white chemise, his hair curled and worn long.
Watercolour on vellum, signed on the obverse with monogram TF, gilt-metal frame with chased foliate border, the reverse erroneously engraved with the Clan Maitland crest and motto CONSILIO ET ANIMIS and further engraved J. Maitland/ Viscount of Lauderdale/ Signed/ TFLATMAN.
Oval, 55mm (2 3/16in) high
Provenance: Heckett Collection, Sotheby's, 24 April 1978, lot 502
Christie's, 8 July 1987, lot 387

Footnotes

  • Another version of the present lot can be found in the National Portrait Gallery, London. This unsigned portrait is ascribed to Thomas Flatman, and the emergence of the present signed version would appear to confirm this attribution. The example in the National Portrait Gallery is slightly larger at 2 1/2 inches high, but shows less of the sitter's cloak and has the frame of the window slightly further over to the right.

    Lord William was the younger son of the 1st Duke of Bedford. He entered Parliament in 1660. Contempt for the dissolute court and fear of Roman Catholicism and of France led him to join the opposition to Charles II. However, in 1678 he was prepared to negotiate with his relative, the Marquis de Ruvigny, agent of Louis XIV, for aid to secure the dissolution of Parliament and the overthrow of the Earl of Danby. In the excitement over the Popish Plot of 1678 he joined the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury in demanding the indictment of the Duke of York (later James II) and in pressing the bill to exclude him from the succession. With the temporary Whig success he became a Privy Councillor in 1679, but he was arrested in 1683, tried, and convicted of treason for his supposed implication in the Rye House Plot. Executed in 1683, he was exonerated by the reversal of attainder under William III.
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