The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques
Lot 1175
The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques
Sold for £45,600 (US$ 76,566) inc. premium
Auction Details
The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques
Lot Details
The Gape Casket: A fine mid-17th century needlework casket of rectangular form, executed in a variety of stitches and techniques
The lid with an oval panel of a woman seated, a metal arrow applied to her hand, a pearl necklace to her neck, a castle beyond with setting full sun, within a raised loop work foliate border and an outer border of embroidered flowers on cream silk satin, the front fitted with a pair of doors worked with a standing gentleman with raised cloak amid buildings, flowers and insects and a lady holding a fan, with tents and buildings beyond amid flowers, the flowers with turned back overlaid leaves, one side with a seated traveller beside a man about to draw his sword, both with tied shoe laces and neck bows, a bull looking on amid trees, flowers and buildings, the other depicting Apollo pursuing Daphne, her breasts exposed, amid trees and flowers with buildings beyond, the lid border worked to three sides with birds, insects, a snail, the back of the casket worked in long running satin stitches with a thistle, stylised flowers and trees in fifteen panels, the casket corners in silver braid, the side carrying handles in bright steel, on four silvered gesso bun feet, the interior fitted to the front with a long drawer below three short drawers, and a lift up panel revealing three secret drawers, the upper section fitted with a removable centre section with central bird figure mounted above a colour landscape print within a border of five mirror panels, and further fitted with a pair of silver topped bottles with flowerhead engraved covers, a rectangular tray fitted with metal inkwell and sander, and with three concealed 'secret drawers', below a mirror with marbled paper to the reverse, complete with the original oak outer case with fall front and hinged lid, the interior lined in marbled paper.

The casket 23cm high, 22.5cm deep, 28cm wide.

The outer case 24cm high, 26.5cm deep, 32.5cm wide.

Footnotes

  • See illustration

    From The Estate Of The Late Howard Phillips

    Purchased by the noted London glass dealer, Howard Phillips, for his personal collection, from Charles Woollett & Son, 59/61 Wigmore Street, London, W1, 6th April 1971 - £600

    The receipt states

    'A Fine Charles II Embroidered Casket, circa 1660, in original wood box. Exhibited by Miss Gape at Kensington, 1870, and previously prior to 1800'

    The Gape family have a pedigree dating back to the 1400s and since that time have been resident in St. Albans. In the 17th century they built St. Michael's Manor, probably on the union of John Gape and Anne Oxton. They had several daughters - Anne (born 1646), Mary (born 1649), Elizabeth (born 1657), and Abigail (born 1664). It is likely that the casket panels were worked by one of the latter two prior to its dispatch to London, where the panels would have been worked into a casket by a specialist cabinet maker.

    St. Michael's Manor is now a hotel.
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