ARCHER, WILLIAM (1856-1924, theatre critic) AND MOORE, GEORGE AUGUSTUS (1852-1933, Irish novelist an
Lot 2
ARCHER, WILLIAM (1856-1924, theatre critic) AND MOORE, GEORGE AUGUSTUS (1852-1933, Irish novelist and playwright) PORTRAITS BY SIR MAX BEERBOHM (1872-1956),
Sold for £1,200 (US$ 2,016) inc. premium
Auction Details
Lot Details
ARCHER, WILLIAM (1856-1924, theatre critic) AND MOORE, GEORGE AUGUSTUS (1852-1933, Irish novelist and playwright)
PORTRAITS BY SIR MAX BEERBOHM (1872-1956),
pen and ink, depicting Archer, in Scottish dress, and Moore, holding a cudgel, in conflict with one another, signed 'Max' and inscribed by him 'George Moore: thwill ye tread on the tail ar me coat? William Archer: Ay, mon, that will I!', evidently relating to their rivalry as drama critics, 11 x 7¾ in (28 x 19.7 cm).

Footnotes

  • REFERENCES: Rupert Hart-Davis; N. John Hall, Max Beerbohm Caricatures, 1997.

    This fine early caricature that can be dated between 1890 and c.1900, is not recorded by Rupert Hart-Davis, A Catalogue of the Caricatures of Max Beerbohm, 1972.

    William Archer, a Scotsman, was the foremost British drama critic of his day and the leading promoter of the plays of Henrik Ibsen. Beerbohm and Archer were very goods friends, although they approached criticism very differently. Max told Archer that, while admiring his 'genius for criticism' with its serious, detached approach, he preferred the 'stimulating prejudices' of critics like George Moore and William Henley. He thought Archer a 'damaging translator' of Ibsen because of his literal approach.

    For Moore, an Irishman, and Max Beerbohm, see under George Moore (lot 111) and for a portrait of Beerbohm see lot 10. Of him as a theatre critic, Beerbohm wrote: 'Mr Moore, beyond being a creative Irishman, is an unique amazing creature, frank to the verge of unscrupulousness and...almost nude in his naiveté...’ There is no portrait of Archer in the National Portrait Gallery and none of Moore by Beerbohm.
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