[SCOTT, Sir WALTER (1771-1832, poet, novelist, historian and biographer)] PEN, INK AND WASH DRAWINGS
Lot 136
[SCOTT, Sir WALTER (1771-1832, poet, novelist, historian and biographer)] PEN, INK AND WASH DRAWINGS OF ABBOTSFORD AND MELROSE ABBEY BY THE LANDSCAPE PAINTER HUGH WILLIAM WILLIAMS (1773-1829),
Sold for £2,040 (US$ 3,428) inc. premium
Auction Details
Lot Details
[SCOTT, Sir WALTER (1771-1832, poet, novelist, historian and biographer)]
PEN, INK AND WASH DRAWINGS OF ABBOTSFORD AND MELROSE ABBEY BY THE LANDSCAPE PAINTER HUGH WILLIAM WILLIAMS (1773-1829),
at the head and foot of an autograph letter signed by Scott to the artist William Scrope (1772-1852), author of Days and Nights of Salmon-Fishing in the Tweed, who was staying at the Pavilion, the nearby hunting-seat of Lord Somervile, inviting him and Williams to dinner the following Sunday, 9 x 6 in ((22.9 x 15.2 cm).

Footnotes

  • EXHIBITED: Cheltenham Literary Festival, Faces and Places, 1982.

    In October 1823, Sir Walter Scott walked the few miles to The Pavilion, a hunting-seat owned by his neighbour Lord Somervile, to invite the painters Hugh William Williams and William Scrope, who were staying there, to dine at Abbortsford. Evidently he missed them, for later in the day he wrote the note addressed to Scrope which appears between the two drawings.

    The story is completed in an accompanying letter (still present) from Hugh William Williams to the miscellaneous writer Katharine Thomson (1797-1862), second wife of the eminent physician Anthony Todd Thomson (1778-1849), dated 26 October 1823, from 65 Castle Street, Edinburgh, who were also to have been guests that day:

    'I took it into my head that you were a little disappointed on not seeing Melrose & Abbotsford - Was it not the case My Dear Mrs Thomson? - Well, but your wishes shall [not] be altogether defeated - you shall see both of those celebrated places (tho' certainly in a very rude way) and it will be next to being in company with 'the great Unknown [Scott] himself to receive a note of his writing - When my friend Mr Scrope put the note into my hand I thought you might like to have it as the least specimen of Sir Walter's penmanship is in great request and urgently sought after, as a relick, by every stranger - The sketches were done on the spot, under great disadvantages since I had the happiness of seeing you & I am sure that they will not be the less acceptable by being done on the paper on which the great author has written...'

    Scott himself described Williams, in a letter of 1810, as 'a very good artist'.
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